Ryzen AI 9 HX 370 approaches Ryzen 7945HX3D Geekbench performance while chilling in Silent Mode

Asus ProArt 16
(Image credit: Asus)

More performance numbers surrounding the new Ryzen AI processors leaked following AMD's official Computex 2024 announcement. Discovered by Benchleaks, a Ryzen AI 9 HX 370 12-core CPU was benchmarked on Geekbench 6 and sports some very impressive numbers.

The CPU was tested on an Asus ProArt P16 prosumer laptop sporting 64GB of memory. Crucially, the chip was benchmarked using the laptop's silent power plan, which reduces system performance and fan speed to maintain quiet operation even under load. It's worth mentioning that Geekbench 6 classifies the CPU as the "AMD Ryzen AI 9 HX 170" with a 100 series nomenclature. However, this is inaccurate and resulted from AMD switching the branding name to the 300 series at the last minute.

(Image credit: Geekbench)
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CPUsSingle CoreMulti Core
Ryzen AI 9 HX 170 12-core2,54414,158
Ryzen 9 8940HS 8-core2,38011,775
Ryzen 9 7945HX3D 16-core2,82016,460

Running in a neutered power state, the Ryzen AI 9 processor scored 2,544 points in the single-core benchmark and 14,158 in the multi-core test. Compared to its predecessor, the Ryzen 9 8940HS, the AI-branded chip is 6.5% faster in the single-core test and 17% faster in the multi-core test. The Ryzen 9 8940HS pumped out scores of 2,380 and 11,775, respectively, for the single and multi-core tests.

The Ryzen AI 9 HX 370's performance is so good that it impressively approaches the performance of AMD's Dragon Range 16-core mobile processors. Looking at the Ryzen 9 7945HX3D benchmark numbers with 3D-VCache technology, the Ryzen AI 9 CPU is only 11% slower in Geekbench's single-core test and 16.2% slower in multi-core performance. The 7945HX3D's Geekbench scores were 2,820 and 16,460 respectively.

These numbers are pretty impressive, all things considered; the fact that we are seeing anything close to Dragon Range levels of performance in an efficiency-optimized power state makes us wonder how much more potent the Ryzen AI 9 HX 370 will be when it is kicked up to its maximum thermal and power envelope. The new chip is part of AMD's latest Ryzen AI 300 series processors sporting its bleeding edge Zen 5 CPU architecture, RDNA 3.5 integrated graphics, and XDNA2 neural engine.

The Ryzen AI 9 HX 370 is a hybrid processor sporting 12 cores in total, consisting of four high-performance Zen 5 cores and eight compact Zen 5c cores. The TDP is rated at 28W, but the configurable TDP ranges between 15W and 54W. As a result, performance will vary wildly depending on what configurable TDP configuration each laptop maker chooses.

We have to take these results with a pinch of salt since Geekbench 6 is just one synthetic test out of many. But, if Geekbench 6's results are indicative of the CPU's real-world performance, AMD's new Zen 5 chips will be really fast, even at lower power envelopes.

Aaron Klotz
Freelance News Writer

Aaron Klotz is a freelance writer for Tom’s Hardware US, covering news topics related to computer hardware such as CPUs, and graphics cards.

  • abufrejoval
    I'm also seeing this Strix Point as quite literally a game changer, because it's the first real console capable design that is sold as a PC with either Steam deck, NUC/console or laptop incarnations and quite a potential range with little more than power presets.

    Hopefully availabilty and prices for the various incarnations will be good enough to actually fulfill all that potential and vendors won't cut into expandability via some odd USB/TB, NVMe, WLAN or RAM options.
    Reply
  • Metal Messiah.
    It was also tested in Geekbench 5 and OpenCL tests. In Geekbench 5.4.5, the chip scored 1847 points in single-core and 14,316 points in multi-core tests.

    Finally, in the OpenCL test, the RDNA 3.5 (Radeon 890M) iGPU scored 41,995 points. Here the 890M's graphics performance is higher than 680M and 780M igpu scores, almost 38-59% faster.

    And almost closing the gap with some entry level discrete mobile/desktop GPUs from the past, 1650 Ti/RTX 2050. But we can't solely rely on OpenCL scores.

    The performance is low, since this could also be an early sample, apart from the Silent Mode test environment being used.

    The 2.0 GHz base clock matches the specs, but the log file shows a boost clock of around 4.2 GHz, which is far below its highest-rated clock rate of 5.1 GHz.

    https://cdn.wccftech.com/wp-content/uploads/2024/06/AMD-Ryzen-AI-9-HX-170-APU-Leak-_-12-Zen-5-Cores-RDNA-3.5-GPU-_-3.png
    https://cdn.wccftech.com/wp-content/uploads/2024/06/AMD-Ryzen-AI-9-HX-170-APU-Leak-_-12-Zen-5-Cores-RDNA-3.5-GPU-_1.png
    Reply
  • Metal Messiah.
    The overall performance is still low. The log file shows a boost clock of around 4.2 GHz, which is far below its highest-rated clock rate of 5.1 GHz.


    Reply
  • Metal Messiah.
    Article::

    "Compared to its predecessor, the Ryzen 9 8940HS, the AI-branded chip is 6.5% faster in the single-core test and 17% faster in the multi-core test. The Ryzen 9 8940HS pumped out scores of 2,380 and 11,775, respectively, for the single and multi-core tests."

    BTW, the correct/actual SKU product name is Ryzen 9 8945HS APU which is the flagship of the "Hawk Point" lineup. Not 8940HS.

    The 2,380 and 11,775 scores exactly match with this SKU.

    https://www.amd.com/en/products/processors/laptop/ryzen/8000-series/amd-ryzen-9-8945hs.html
    Reply
  • Notton
    I want to see the AI 9 HX 370 beating the 7945HX3D, not catching up to it.
    If the chip is that fast without 3D cache... would it be faster if it had it, or are we going to run into thermal problems?
    Reply
  • TechyIT223
    Wait for proper third party benchmarks as well
    Reply
  • Metal Messiah.
    Notton said:
    If the chip is that fast without 3D cache... would it be faster if it had it, or are we going to run into thermal problems?

    As per leaks, Strix Point lineup won't come in any X3D flavor. I expect the next-gen "Fire Range" APUs to succeed the current 7045X3D "Dragon Range" lineup, including the flagship Ryzen 9 7945HX3D.

    The cTDP value set by AMD for this new Ryzen AI chip is 15-54W ! Whereas, Dragon Range's configurable TDP (cTDP) is 45/55-75W. So a direct comparison of these two chips would be tricky somtimes.

    At least for the iGPU part/graphics, all Dragon Range chips only sport 2 CU core count 610M processor, vs 16 CU on this top Strix Point AI 370 part.
    Reply
  • Alvar "Miles" Udell
    I'd trust Cinebench more on this type of test than Geekbench as it taxes the CPU quite heavily under its multicore test, but these kind of results should be expected and -demanded- and not be a surprise. Generational IPC uplift should always be measured in double digits, and with process nodes changing essentially every generation then higher efficiency should also be expected.
    Reply
  • usertests
    abufrejoval said:
    I'm also seeing this Strix Point as quite literally a game changer, because it's the first real console capable design that is sold as a PC with either Steam deck, NUC/console or laptop incarnations and quite a potential range with little more than power presets.
    By "console capable" I assume you're talking about the graphics meeting or exceeding the performance of an Xbox Series S. That could be the case if 890M graphics is ~40% faster than 780M. The CPU performance is overkill and doesn't matter, except for benefiting lower-power devices.

    Notton said:
    I want to see the AI 9 HX 370 beating the 7945HX3D, not catching up to it.
    If the chip is that fast without 3D cache... would it be faster if it had it, or are we going to run into thermal problems?
    It was running in a low power mode.

    Just from some idiot math, a 16% IPC increase should have 12-core Zen 5 feeling like 14-core Zen 4. There are Zen 5c cores in play here with lower peak clock speeds, but with thermal constraints, 7945HX3D all-core might not be that high anyway. Zen 5's lack of significant clock speed increases probably means it's using less power and maintaining clocks well, from moving to a TSMC N4 node. However, Phoenix/Hawk was already on N4.

    AMD hasn't added 3D V-Cache to mainstream APUs yet. 7945HX3D is a 7950X3D desktop CPU repackaged for BGA laptops and mini PCs. We have no idea if Strix Point, Strix Halo, etc. would be given 3D V-Cache. "Fire Range" will likely get 3D V-Cache, being the Zen 5 version of Dragon Range.

    V-Cache would increase gaming performance for some games, but not every workload would benefit.
    Reply
  • thestryker
    Metal Messiah. said:
    It was also tested in Geekbench 5 and OpenCL tests. In Geekbench 5.4.5, the chip scored 1847 points in single-core and 14,316 points in multi-core tests.

    Finally, in the OpenCL test, the RDNA 3.5 (Radeon 890M) iGPU scored 41,995 points. Here the 890M's graphics performance is higher than 680M and 780M igpu scores, almost 38-59% faster.
    OpenCL doesn't really stress memory bandwidth so it's meaningless for determining IGP graphical performance. Once we have real graphics benchmarks it will give us insight as to how much performance is being left on the table though.
    abufrejoval said:
    I'm also seeing this Strix Point as quite literally a game changer, because it's the first real console capable design that is sold as a PC with either Steam deck, NUC/console or laptop incarnations and quite a potential range with little more than power presets.
    Unless there's some extra cache that hasn't been disclosed Strix Point is basically just 4 more CUs on a tweaked RDNA 3. It will likely be memory bandwidth constrained just like everything with the 680M and 780M are.
    Reply