Adata XPG GAMMIX S10 SSD Review

Conclusion

Some might say that the Adata XPG GAMMIX S10 is a dressed-up Intel 600p, but there are some slight differences between the two products. We can't say the same about the Adata SX7000. Under the hood, the XPG GAMMIX S10 is secretly Adata's entry-level 7000-series NVMe SSD, and your device manager will even identify it as such.

The Adata GAMMIX S10 512GB will deliver a pleasant experience for most users, but the delta between good and sluggish is closer than you would find on a higher-end model like the Samsung 960 EVO (with TLC memory) or the MyDigitalSSD BPX (MLC).

Most users rarely write a lot of data to the drive in one setting, aside from during the initial system setup. Most desktop PC users write less than a few gigabytes a day after they've installed Office, games, and other applications. If you are honest with yourself about your workload, an entry-level SSD could be a solid solution for your needs. For most PC users, these drives perform better than similarly-priced SATA models.

The Adata XPG GAMMIX S10 doesn't provide class-leading performance. The heatsink makes it look the part, but it's largely ineffective at combating thermal throttling. Not to get side-tracked, but the thermal tape off to the side of the controller was a bad move.

The SSD does give you a decent SLC buffer window that's long enough to absorb common write workloads. The S10's sequential performance for both reads and writes is higher than SATA can deliver even with the best flash and controller. The Adata XPG GAMMIX S10 is exactly the kind of product DIY'ers look for. It's a budget drive that delivers better performance than some higher-priced products.

The drive also gives me a weird feeling inside because, like the Intel 600p, it has award potential. This drive is an excellent value for most users, delivers better-than-SATA performance, and looks good doing it. This is a good drive for many people, but at the same time, it's a really bad drive for the rest of us. The distance between a good user experience and a bad one is fairly small. You're literally a Blu-Ray ISO transfer away from being in a latent hell. You can pocket the savings and live with the poor performance on the rare occasions when you write a lot of data, or you could pay more and have a much larger gap between the two drive states.

When it comes to performance, the difference between the good and bad state is extreme. When you cross that threshold, you will wish your shopping cart had an 850 EVO in it. The XPG GAMMIX S10 doesn't stutter, in our experience, but it gets right up to that point. You can feel the latency after heavy workloads when your windows slow after a double-click. It took a lot for us to get the drive in that condition, but once it was there, we knew something didn’t feel right.

We had a much easier time with our Intel 600p recommendation. The real issue is pricing. Personally, the Adata XPG GAMMIX S10 512GB would be a really good fit for many of my computers. There are some systems where it wouldn't, but for many, this drive would work very well and save them some money.

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  • AgentLozen
    In the right context with the right mindset this is a decent SSD. If you're a frequent reader of Tomshardware, it's probably not for you. Maybe your kid would appreciate it with that flashy heat sink and all.

    edit: a few words
  • R_1
    Why are people making/buying 120GB SSDs?
    240GB is the bottom floor IRL.
  • Verrin
    Anonymous said:
    Why are people making/buying 120GB SSDs?
    240GB is the bottom floor IRL.


    I'm confident you already know the answer to that. Cost is the ultimate limiting factor, and as long as there is demand for smaller capacities due to the budget constraints of others, 120/128GB SSDs will continue to exist. And it seems clear that people still find them plenty functional, or else they wouldn't be buying them.
  • R_1
    Anonymous said:
    Anonymous said:
    Why are people making/buying 120GB SSDs?
    240GB is the bottom floor IRL.


    I'm confident you already know the answer to that. Cost is the ultimate limiting factor, and as long as there is demand for smaller capacities due to the budget constraints of others, 120/128GB SSDs will continue to exist. And it seems clear that people still find them plenty functional, or else they wouldn't be buying them.




    I love a small SSD, I use DATAPLEX, however without the software a 120GB is less than useful for an enthusiast PC.
    to me it was a waste of the reviewers time I am only glad they got paid for it
    the results were known by anyone who has ever read more than the article titles here before the review
    120GB is half the speed of a 240. again why the review?
  • daglesj
    120GB are fine for stuffing in Office machines and laptops for light use. Sometimes you don't need or want to have masses of data stored on machines, you just want speed of daily tasks. 60GB is often fine for machines that do Word or Excel all day.
  • mischon123
    They grabbed bottom of the barrel chips and cover the mess with a big red piece of airflowkilling plastic. Tom`s propaganda unit then writes lipstick on the pig.
  • HERETIC-1
    MISCHON-I think you are being very unfair to Chris-He writes it as he sees it,and I think he was spot on....

    Chris,what do you think the reason is for Samsung's poor performance in mixed read/write? Seems the only area they fall down.
  • CRamseyer
    Anonymous said:
    They grabbed bottom of the barrel chips and cover the mess with a big red piece of airflowkilling plastic. Tom`s propaganda unit then writes lipstick on the pig.


    I don't remember writing in lipstick. What color was it? The testing shows the product in a very clear light.
  • ev3rm0r3
    I don't understand why my 961 m.2 256gb stick from 2 years ago still outperforms all of these listed 2:1. I can hit read/writes considerably higher even for a 256gb model. As far as the 120gb model, honestly from day one I've always separated my OS from the installs/media/gaming drives I use. You get much better performance breaking up your os from your read/write/float from other software/media that way. So if you throw windows even onto a 60gb ssd m.2 you will still be under-reaching its max performance while having all your installs on a much bigger m.2 preferably for the installs.

    I would say on laptops you would be confined to just 1 m.2 but that's not the case anymore either so you can easily still split your load on a laptop between 2 drives in the same manner. I don't think I'll ever host my os on my main drive that shares everything. That's too much risk of total loss if that one drive fails. And yes its more then a practical setup. It's not really an argument.