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AOC E1659FWU And GeChic On-Lap 1502I: Portable Monitors, To Go

Results: Color Gamut And Performance

Color gamut is measured using a saturation sweep that samples the six main colors (red, green, blue, cyan, magenta, and yellow) at five saturation levels (20, 40, 60, 80, and 100%). This provides a more realistic view of color accuracy than sampling only the 100 percent saturations. Since there are no color management controls on the E1659FWU, we're only showing the post-calibration graphs (although we’re sure they'd look pretty much the same out-of-box).

AOC’s color gamut is quite under-saturated in the red, magenta, and blue region. And because of the too-cool grayscale tracking, the secondary colors are clocked well away from their targets. The luminance values for blue and magenta are set higher to compensate, but the overall result is still fairly inaccurate. We recorded Delta E values as high as 20.26.

The last GeChic portable we reviewed, the On-Lap 2502M, rendered a similarly under-saturated color gamut. The green, cyan, and yellow side of the triangle is OK but its blue, magenta, and red section is noticeably light in color. That saturation tracks fine from the center outwards, but any color in the lower-right part of the gamut triangle looks washed out. When you look at the luminance chart, you can see those under-saturated colors are pumped up with higher brightness values.

The On-Lap 1502I manages to stay close to its desktop counterparts in color accuracy, but the E1659FWU lags behind. AOC's one saving grace is that its color errors decrease at higher brightness and saturation levels. Most business-oriented content looks alright, but photos and videos appear washed out, lacking depth and pop.

Gamut Volume: Adobe RGB 1998

There are basically two categories of displays in use today: those that conform to the sRGB/Rec 709 standard like HDTVs, and wide-gamut panels that show as much as 100 percent of the Adobe RGB 1998 spec. We use Gamutvision to calculate the gamut volume, based on an ICC profile created from actual measurements. The chart shows the percentage of both sRGB and Adobe RGB 1998 gamuts.

These portable monitors are not meant to be used for critical photo or video editing. Their color gamuts fall well short of both the Adobe RGB and sRGB standards. While we would not expect to see a wide-gamut product in this category, there’s no reason why they shouldn’t support the sRGB specs.

  • g-unit1111
    Interesting, I'm interested in getting one of the USB displays but the resolution is keeping me from purchasing one. I'd like to see how the AOC monitor compares to the ones being offered from Asus, HP, Dell, and so on and so forth.
    Reply
  • mathew7
    So....I am looking for a few years for a small (15" would be limit) portable VGA+HDMI monitor (as in not a bulky stand). I don't need FullHD resolution, but it should accept it.

    In a related note, I have been thinking about a laptop-styled monitor+keyboard (and maybe mouse/touchpad) but to be plugged into a desktop PC. You know...when you receive a PC case (or go to someone) and have to debug it. But again, 15" is already big (I'm using a 12.5" thinkpad when not at my gaming/workstation PC).
    Reply
  • Amdlova
    can connect to smart phone!???
    Reply
  • ceberle
    You can connect the On-Lap to a phone or tablet via its HDMI/MHL port. The AOC will only work via USB.

    -Christian-
    Reply
  • Nicolai8086
    When can we expect a Miracast (or WiDi) version of these screens?
    Reply
  • CrisCrossed
    Two words:
    Able HD
    http://www.able-hd.com
    One of the most funded projects on kickstarter. These guys make portable monitors that are HD and really cheap. Unfortunately, they still have their flaws (the circuit board is exposed and not attached to the screen) but you cannot beat the price/performance.
    Reply
  • Nicolai8086
    The weight is impressive, but i wouldn't call 17" portable.
    Reply
  • g-unit1111
    12343796 said:
    Two words:
    Able HD
    http://www.able-hd.com
    One of the most funded projects on kickstarter. These guys make portable monitors that are HD and really cheap. Unfortunately, they still have their flaws (the circuit board is exposed and not attached to the screen) but you cannot beat the price/performance.

    I have to say after reading about these that I do want one. When my laptop's primary display is 1920 x 1080, why would I want to add a second monitor that's 1366 x 720?
    Reply
  • egaskill
    Portable display for Raspberry Pi?
    Reply
  • CrisCrossed
    I have to say after reading about these that I do want one. When my laptop's primary display is 1920 x 1080, why would I want to add a second monitor that's 1366 x 720?
    I'm sorry, I mistyped. The monitor is actually a FHD (1080p) display, and it comes in 15.6 and 17 inch screens. I hope this helps. I'm ordering mine soon to use with a LAN box.
    Reply