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Corsair 7000D Airflow Review: New High-End Workstation King?

I forgot how big full-tower cases are.

Corsair Obsidian 7000D
Editor's Choice
(Image: © Tom's Hardware)

 We are using the following system for our case test bed: 

CPUIntel Core i9-9900K
MotherboardAsus Maximus XI Hero WiFi
MemoryCorsair Vengeance LPX 3000 MHz, 16 GB (2x 8GB)
GraphicsNvidia GeForce RTX 2070 Super Founder's Edition
CPU CoolingNoctua NH-U12S Chromax.Black
 Noctua NT-H2 Thermal Paste
StorageCorsair Force Series MP510 NVMe SSD, 480GB
Power SupplyCorsair HX750i

Motherboard Installation 

(Image credit: Niels Broekhuijsen, Tom's Hardware)

Installing the Asus Maximus XI Hero motherboard in this chassis was dead simple with the anchoring central standoff. Of course, this standoff matters less in smaller cases, but with a case this big, it’s really nice not to have to lay it on its side to fasten the motherboard into place – because that would be a lot of effort.

If you want to install larger boards, you’ll have to remove the extension piece on the cable cover shroud.

GPU Installation 

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Corsair Obsidian 7000D

(Image credit: Niels Broekhuijsen, Tom's Hardware)
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Corsair Obsidian 7000D

(Image credit: Niels Broekhuijsen, Tom's Hardware)

The GPU installation was even easier, with just two thumbscrews.  

PSU Installation 

(Image credit: Niels Broekhuijsen, Tom's Hardware)

That said, installing the PSU was a bit less of a breeze. We’re using one of Corsair’s large HX750i power supplies, and I wasn’t able to get it installed without removing the hard drive cage. Of course, that’s a one-thumbscrew kind of thing, but I generally prefer a removable plate at the rear of the case.

That being said, I’m bickering over a single thumbscrew, so it’s not a huge issue. I do appreciate that this case fits a massive six 3.5-inch drives – under its PSU shroud. That’s crazy, and worth the added effort here. But, keep in mind that our HX750i is just about the biggest PSU (180mm) you’ll be able to fit without sacrificing one of the HDD cages. If you want thick front radiators or a side radiator, along with a big power supply, you won’t be able to fit any 3.5-inch drives in here.  

Cable Management 

(Image credit: Niels Broekhuijsen, Tom's Hardware)

Cable management in the 7000D is excellent, as expected. The only catch is that I had to use the space above the PSU to throw some cable slack into, which would be visible from the other side due to the mesh – but really, it’s not an issue as the glass panel is tinted so dark, it hides most of the internals anyway. 

Build Complete 

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Corsair Obsidian 7000D

(Image credit: Niels Broekhuijsen, Tom's Hardware)
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Corsair Obsidian 7000D

(Image credit: Niels Broekhuijsen, Tom's Hardware)
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Corsair Obsidian 7000D

(Image credit: Niels Broekhuijsen, Tom's Hardware)
Niels Broekhuijsen
Niels Broekhuijsen is a Contributing Writer for Tom's Hardware US. He covers hardware news on all components and peripherals.
  • mikewinddale
    I have a few questions:

    (1) Are the cable-routing channels blocked when you install an E-ATX motherboard?

    (2) Are there any E-ATX compatible cases that have cable-routing channels that are not blocked by an E-ATX motherboard?

    (3) With cases that have side panel fans, what happens if you forget to disconnect the fans before removing the side panel? I imagine your motherboard will get a hard tug, and perhaps some bent pins. Are there such a thing as a safety quick disconnect fan cable extender? I.e., a fan cable extender that is designed to be the weakest point, so that if you tug it, the cable extender will disconnect, without putting tension on the fan or the motherboard? If such a cable exists, then removing the side panel without first disconnecting the fan might break the cable extender, but that's better than breaking your fan or breaking your motherboard.

    And a comment:

    I would have liked to see bottom fan slots. In my current build, with a Supermicro M12SWA-TF motherboard and a NH-U14S TR4-SP3 cooler, the heatsink is oriented so that the CPU fans blow vertically. So in my Phanteks Enthoo Pro 2 case, I set up the case fans so that I've got 2 exhaust fans directly above the CPU, and 2 intake fans at the bottom of the case, blowing upwards towards those 2 exhaust fans. Those 2 bottom intake fans are probably not essential, since I also have 2 front intake fans, but I like having them anyway.
    Reply
  • Udyr
    mikewinddale said:
    (3) With cases that have side panel fans, what happens if you forget to disconnect the fans before removing the side panel? I imagine your motherboard will get a hard tug, and perhaps some bent pins. Are there such a thing as a safety quick disconnect fan cable extender? I.e., a fan cable extender that is designed to be the weakest point, so that if you tug it, the cable extender will disconnect, without putting tension on the fan or the motherboard? If such a cable exists, then removing the side panel without first disconnecting the fan might break the cable extender, but that's better than breaking your fan or breaking your motherboard.
    From my personal experience, if the motherboard is properly secured to the chassis, the worst case scenario is a bent pin on the motherboard's header or a ripped fan cable, usually closest to the connector.

    With a cable extension you won't have such problems, unless you go full King Arthur pulling the sword out of the rock, since the cable will be long enough to be a non issue. Also, some fans come with a cable long enough to somewhat prevent these accidents.
    Reply
  • Sleepy_Hollowed
    This is an amazing case, and makes me wonder why I haven't been buying Full-Tower cases, since I usually use 4 disc RAID on mid towers and everything is so tight and my options are always limited.

    This might be the case I get next, and switch to Full Tower permanently.

    The price is very reasonable considering they've thought of everything with this one.
    Reply
  • deesider
    I hope it's strong enough to sit on - with those dimensions it makes a very tempting seat for someone...
    Reply
  • digitalgriffin
    mikewinddale said:
    I have a few questions:

    (1) Are the cable-routing channels blocked when you install an E-ATX motherboard?

    (2) Are there any E-ATX compatible cases that have cable-routing channels that are not blocked by an E-ATX motherboard?

    (3) With cases that have side panel fans, what happens if you forget to disconnect the fans before removing the side panel? I imagine your motherboard will get a hard tug, and perhaps some bent pins. Are there such a thing as a safety quick disconnect fan cable extender? I.e., a fan cable extender that is designed to be the weakest point, so that if you tug it, the cable extender will disconnect, without putting tension on the fan or the motherboard? If such a cable exists, then removing the side panel without first disconnecting the fan might break the cable extender, but that's better than breaking your fan or breaking your motherboard.

    And a comment:

    I would have liked to see bottom fan slots. In my current build, with a Supermicro M12SWA-TF motherboard and a NH-U14S TR4-SP3 cooler, the heatsink is oriented so that the CPU fans blow vertically. So in my Phanteks Enthoo Pro 2 case, I set up the case fans so that I've got 2 exhaust fans directly above the CPU, and 2 intake fans at the bottom of the case, blowing upwards towards those 2 exhaust fans. Those 2 bottom intake fans are probably not essential, since I also have 2 front intake fans, but I like having them anyway.

    Use a fan extension cable. Problem solved. They will disconnect on any soft tug/pull
    Reply