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Corsair 7000D Airflow Review: New High-End Workstation King?

I forgot how big full-tower cases are.

Corsair Obsidian 7000D
Editor's Choice
(Image: © Tom's Hardware)

Our Verdict

Corsair’s 7000D lays out the red carpet for your hardware, offering an excellent foundation for building a big, mean, business machine. Just keep space in mind, as this case truly is big.

For

  • Excellent design & production quality
  • No RGB. Just a clean, professional appearance
  • Dark glass tint hides hardware mismatching
  • Lavish top IO

Against

  • Big & heavy
  • Pricy
  • Overkill for most builds

Back in September of 2020, Corsair introduced its 4000X and 4000D cases, offering up two pretty case designs that in a way, set the benchmark for simplistic, modern, but classic ATX tower design. Then, in January the company dropped the 5000X and 5000D (full review of the 5000X here), growing the case in dimensions – but I wasn’t the biggest fan of the 5000X that I reviewed due to basically forcing you to use the side intake to get decent thermals, while offering little more added space than the 4000X.

So, when Corsair reached out asking if I wanted to review its new 7000X or 7000D chassis, and I got a peek at its designs, I decided to have a look at the 7000D, this time passing on the front RGB goodness in favor of a mesh intake. Let’s see if I like this one more, and whether it’s good enough for our Best PC Cases list. Pricing is set at $260, so this better be good. 

Specifications

TypeFull-Tower ATX
Motherboard SupportMini-ITX, Micro-ATX, ATX, E-ATX
Dimensions (HxWxD)23.6 x 9.7 x 21.7 inches (600 x 248 x 550 mm)
Max GPU Length17.7 inches (450 mm)
CPU Cooler Height7.5 inches (190 mm)
Max PSU Length8.9 inches (225 mm)
External Bays✗ 
Internal Bays6x 3.5-inch
 4x 2.5-inch
Expansion Slots8x + 3x
Front I/O4x USB 3.0, Optional USB-C, 3.5 mm Audio/Mic Combo
OtherTempered Glass Panel, PWM Fan Hub
Front Fans2x 140 mm (Up to 3x 140mm, 4x 120mm)
Rear Fans1x 140mm (Up to 1x 140mm)
Top FansNone (Up to 4x 120mm, 3x 140mm)
Bottom FansNone
Side FansNone (up to 4x 120mm)
RGBNo
DampingNo
Warranty2 Years

Feature

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Corsair Obsidian 7000D

(Image credit: Niels Broekhuijsen, Tom's Hardware)
Image 2 of 3

Corsair Obsidian 7000D

(Image credit: Niels Broekhuijsen, Tom's Hardware)
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Corsair Obsidian 7000D

(Image credit: Niels Broekhuijsen, Tom's Hardware)

Touring around the outside of the case, you’ll spot three things: the clean, focused design, side intake, and the absolutely enormous dimensions. This is a full-tower case, and I’d forgotten just how big these are – the 7000D measures a whopping 23.6 inches (600mm) tall, and it’s not narrow either at a massive 9.8 inches (248 mm). Of course, that’s kind of what you get when you want a chassis that fits two 480mm radiators and one 420mm unit. Yeah. 

(Image credit: Niels Broekhuijsen, Tom's Hardware)

Front IO is just as lavish, featuring a massive four USB 3.0 ports, a USB Type-C port, and a headphone & mic combo jack. I prefer to see the latter separate, but this is fine for quick convenience use, because for the best quality you should use the rear jacks on the motherboard anyway.

Keep in mind though, in order to use all four USB 3.0 ports, you’ll have to find a motherboard that has two internal USB 3.0 headers – they do two ports each, and the vast majority of motherboards only come with a single header for two ports, including our Asus Maximus XI Hero board used for case testing.  

Image 1 of 2

Corsair Obsidian 7000D

(Image credit: Niels Broekhuijsen, Tom's Hardware)
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Corsair Obsidian 7000D

(Image credit: Niels Broekhuijsen, Tom's Hardware)

To access the case’s internals, you simply pull the side panels out of their pins and swivel them open.  

Internal Layout 

(Image credit: Niels Broekhuijsen, Tom's Hardware)

The panels are sat on hinges, and after removing a securing screw at the top of the top hinge, they come right off for easier system assembly. 

(Image credit: Niels Broekhuijsen, Tom's Hardware)

In the main compartment, you’ll spot that there’s a ton of space for a system, with an ATX board occupying only about half the horizontal space. Notice that there are a total of 11 expansion slots, three of which are vertical, and removing the cable cover makes room for larger E-ATX motherboards. 

(Image credit: Niels Broekhuijsen, Tom's Hardware)

Flip around to the other side of the chassis and you’ll find very little – until you open the second door. Why there’s another internal door when there’s no glass panel to show the cables here I’m not sure about, but it’s there, and it does make shoving the system shut easier.  

(Image credit: Niels Broekhuijsen, Tom's Hardware)

Behind the door is Corsair’s RapidRoute cable management system, which is a solid setup with tons of Velcro straps (extra are included) and nifty plastic guides to tuck the cables into. There’s also room for three 2.5-inch SSDs and a total of six 3.5-inch HDDs under the PSU shroud. 

(Image credit: Niels Broekhuijsen, Tom's Hardware)

That being said, the HDD sleds have no rubber grommets, only toolless installation mechanisms. That’s fine in a case that has very few hard drive bays, as most builders don’t use them anymore anyway, but the HDD space is a good reason to opt for the Obsidian 7000D. So I feel rubber anti-vibration grommets should be included in over the convenience of a toolless installation mechanism, especially at this price point. Yes, that’s a little more effort during assembly, but it would prevent the rattling, in case the tolerances between drives and the toolless sleds don’t quite line up.  

Cooling 

(Image credit: Niels Broekhuijsen, Tom's Hardware)

For cooling, Corsair doesn’t include a whole lot but what it does, is plenty for basic setups: three 140mm fans. They’re all PWM spinners, wired to a six-fan PWM hub for easy fan control.  

(Image credit: Niels Broekhuijsen, Tom's Hardware)

I do appreciate this fan hub, as it wires into a PWM cable to control the fans through your motherboard’s ecosystem – which I generally prefer over Corsair’s own iCue system. The thing I would have liked to see, especially because this case can fit way more than six fans, is either a second hub or a bigger hub, though because the hub is powered by SATA and only uses a motherboard for RPM and PWM signaling, it should be safe to connect more fans with a handful of splitters anyway.

Meanwhile, the front of the chassis and side intake each have fine filters, and the top of the case has a rough filter to prevent dropping particles from falling into the system. The PSU also has a fine filter, and it comes out the side of the case for easy access – a nice touch, especially considering chances are you won’t want to move a big, heavy system like this for regular maintenance.

Included Accessories 

(Image credit: Niels Broekhuijsen, Tom's Hardware)

Corsair includes a few, but not a ton of accessories with the 7000D. You’ll find a vertical GPU bracket, though no GPU riser cable, six extra Velcro straps for cable management, a replacement PSU shroud bit that makes space for big radiators (though you’ll have to sacrifice a HDD caddy to use it), and a PWM extension cable in case your fan header is in an inconvenient location, and the baggy with all the fasteners.

With that out of the way, lets get on to the build. 

Niels Broekhuijsen
Niels Broekhuijsen is a Contributing Writer for Tom's Hardware US. He covers hardware news on all components and peripherals.
  • mikewinddale
    I have a few questions:

    (1) Are the cable-routing channels blocked when you install an E-ATX motherboard?

    (2) Are there any E-ATX compatible cases that have cable-routing channels that are not blocked by an E-ATX motherboard?

    (3) With cases that have side panel fans, what happens if you forget to disconnect the fans before removing the side panel? I imagine your motherboard will get a hard tug, and perhaps some bent pins. Are there such a thing as a safety quick disconnect fan cable extender? I.e., a fan cable extender that is designed to be the weakest point, so that if you tug it, the cable extender will disconnect, without putting tension on the fan or the motherboard? If such a cable exists, then removing the side panel without first disconnecting the fan might break the cable extender, but that's better than breaking your fan or breaking your motherboard.

    And a comment:

    I would have liked to see bottom fan slots. In my current build, with a Supermicro M12SWA-TF motherboard and a NH-U14S TR4-SP3 cooler, the heatsink is oriented so that the CPU fans blow vertically. So in my Phanteks Enthoo Pro 2 case, I set up the case fans so that I've got 2 exhaust fans directly above the CPU, and 2 intake fans at the bottom of the case, blowing upwards towards those 2 exhaust fans. Those 2 bottom intake fans are probably not essential, since I also have 2 front intake fans, but I like having them anyway.
    Reply
  • Udyr
    mikewinddale said:
    (3) With cases that have side panel fans, what happens if you forget to disconnect the fans before removing the side panel? I imagine your motherboard will get a hard tug, and perhaps some bent pins. Are there such a thing as a safety quick disconnect fan cable extender? I.e., a fan cable extender that is designed to be the weakest point, so that if you tug it, the cable extender will disconnect, without putting tension on the fan or the motherboard? If such a cable exists, then removing the side panel without first disconnecting the fan might break the cable extender, but that's better than breaking your fan or breaking your motherboard.
    From my personal experience, if the motherboard is properly secured to the chassis, the worst case scenario is a bent pin on the motherboard's header or a ripped fan cable, usually closest to the connector.

    With a cable extension you won't have such problems, unless you go full King Arthur pulling the sword out of the rock, since the cable will be long enough to be a non issue. Also, some fans come with a cable long enough to somewhat prevent these accidents.
    Reply
  • Sleepy_Hollowed
    This is an amazing case, and makes me wonder why I haven't been buying Full-Tower cases, since I usually use 4 disc RAID on mid towers and everything is so tight and my options are always limited.

    This might be the case I get next, and switch to Full Tower permanently.

    The price is very reasonable considering they've thought of everything with this one.
    Reply
  • deesider
    I hope it's strong enough to sit on - with those dimensions it makes a very tempting seat for someone...
    Reply
  • digitalgriffin
    mikewinddale said:
    I have a few questions:

    (1) Are the cable-routing channels blocked when you install an E-ATX motherboard?

    (2) Are there any E-ATX compatible cases that have cable-routing channels that are not blocked by an E-ATX motherboard?

    (3) With cases that have side panel fans, what happens if you forget to disconnect the fans before removing the side panel? I imagine your motherboard will get a hard tug, and perhaps some bent pins. Are there such a thing as a safety quick disconnect fan cable extender? I.e., a fan cable extender that is designed to be the weakest point, so that if you tug it, the cable extender will disconnect, without putting tension on the fan or the motherboard? If such a cable exists, then removing the side panel without first disconnecting the fan might break the cable extender, but that's better than breaking your fan or breaking your motherboard.

    And a comment:

    I would have liked to see bottom fan slots. In my current build, with a Supermicro M12SWA-TF motherboard and a NH-U14S TR4-SP3 cooler, the heatsink is oriented so that the CPU fans blow vertically. So in my Phanteks Enthoo Pro 2 case, I set up the case fans so that I've got 2 exhaust fans directly above the CPU, and 2 intake fans at the bottom of the case, blowing upwards towards those 2 exhaust fans. Those 2 bottom intake fans are probably not essential, since I also have 2 front intake fans, but I like having them anyway.

    Use a fan extension cable. Problem solved. They will disconnect on any soft tug/pull
    Reply