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Lian Li Q58 Review: Best ITX Case Yet?

Balancing looks and airflow just right

Lian Li Q58
Editor's Choice
(Image: © Niels Broekhuijsen, Tom's Hardware)

We are using the following system for today’s build:

CPUIntel Core i5-11600K
MotherboardAsus ROG Strix Z590-I Gaming WiFi
MemoryG.Skill Trident Neo 16GB, 3600 MHz
GraphicsZotac RTX 3080 Ti Amp Holo
CPU CoolingPhanteks 240MP AIO with Noctua NF-A12x25 fans
Noctua NT-H2 Thermal Paste
StorageCorsair Force Series MP600 NVMe SSD, 480GB
Power SupplyCorsair SF750 750W SFF PSU

With this build, we’re using the new ITX case test setup based on the 11th Gen Intel Core i5-11600K processor, paired with an Asus Z590 ITX motherboard and a large RTX 3080 Ti graphics card. That’s a lot of hardware to throw at an ITX case, but the Q58 shouldn’t be troubled by this. That said, the Zotac GPU might be too big, so I do have the RTX 2070 Super ready in case I need it. 

Step 1: PSU Installation

(Image credit: Niels Broekhuijsen, Tom's Hardware)

First, I installed the power supply in its designated location. By default, the case comes with the SFF bracket pre-installed, and the PSU slides right into place. If you have an SFF-L PSU, you may need to remove the bracket, install the PSU onto it, and re-install the lot.

Step 2: Motherboard Installation

(Image credit: Niels Broekhuijsen, Tom's Hardware)

Then, I installed the Asus motherboard, with the AIO’s pump head already installed. I could try and get the PCIe riser cable out of the way and install the pump head afterwards, but that seems like an inefficient way of going about things.

Step 3: AIO Installation

(Image credit: Niels Broekhuijsen, Tom's Hardware)

Then, it was time to install the AIO’s radiator at the top of the case. The Q58 supports 280mm radiators, as you can tell from the bracket I removed from the top of the chassis, but I don’t have a 280mm AIO available (yet). So, I installed the bracket and tried to put the radiator in place.

(Image credit: Niels Broekhuijsen, Tom's Hardware)

But I made a mistake: I installed the radiator on the bracket outside the case, and with the tubes not routed through the top opening, I couldn’t get it in place. So, I undid the radiator again, ran its tubes correctly, and re-installed the bracket. At this point, I decided that it would be easiest to leave the radiator uninstalled and off to the side, as this would give me extra clearance for cable management.

Step 4: Cable Management

(Image credit: Niels Broekhuijsen, Tom's Hardware)

Next, I decided it was time to tidy up all the cables. I find that in ITX cases, this is easiest to do without the GPU installed, as it just gets in the way. About 30 minutes later, I achieved the below result, which is quite tidy.

(Image credit: Niels Broekhuijsen, Tom's Hardware)

But there is a catch: The cable slack from the power supply had to go somewhere, and I shoved it right below the PSU. There is plenty of space here, but it is the spot where otherwise, you could install a 120mm intake fan. With some creativity and a lot of extra time, you could fit a fan here and use the standard cables that come with a power supply. There is some space behind the PSU, and you could jam things in a bit tidier – after all, the back of the fan has the prongs that hold up the motor, so you’re unlikely to get blade contact.

However, for best results, you may want to budget for a custom cable set that’s made to the exact lengths you require. This will lead to an easier build and much tidier looks.

Step 5: GPU Installation

(Image credit: Niels Broekhuijsen, Tom's Hardware)

With all the cables tidied, and the PCIe power cables pre-routed, installing the large Zotac RTX 3080 Ti was a breeze. I did have to nudge the PCIe riser card over a bit, but with that done, the GPU slotted right into place.

(Image credit: Niels Broekhuijsen, Tom's Hardware)

There’s just one thing I need to mention here: The GPU end of the PCIe riser cable could use some extra support. I was pushing down on the GPU, seeking that satisfying ‘click’ letting you know that it’s fastened into the slot, but I wasn’t getting it.

(Image credit: Niels Broekhuijsen, Tom's Hardware)

As you can see, I managed to bend the PCB a bit. This wasn’t a problem – I hadn’t damaged it and it did work just fine, but if you’re not careful, you might. Two simple standoffs to hold it up at each end isn’t enough to protect against uncareful installers bludgeoning the GPU in, so I’d like to see Lian Li add a support brace here.

Build Complete

(Image credit: Niels Broekhuijsen, Tom's Hardware)

With that, the build was complete. Time to throw on the panels.

Image 1 of 2

Lian Li Q58

(Image credit: Niels Broekhuijsen, Tom's Hardware)
Image 2 of 2

Lian Li Q58

(Image credit: Niels Broekhuijsen, Tom's Hardware)

In the end, building a system into the Q58 wasn’t as tough as ITX cases used to be. Admittedly, this one was a little trickier with the cable management and cramped space for cable slack, but it was still perfectly manageable with some time and patience. The Hyte Revolt 3 certainly builds easier, but it doesn’t have as nice a finish as the Q58, and while the Louqe Raw S1 both builds easier and is way more premium, it does cost much more and offers far fewer storage, cooling, and PSU options.

Niels Broekhuijsen

Niels Broekhuijsen is a Contributing Writer for Tom's Hardware US. He reviews cases, water cooling and pc builds.

  • Geef
    There is a damn good reason for NOT allowing a side with vents. Imagine your playing a game and bump! Whoops your Pepsi just tipped over and splashed right into that vent and this case has the video card right there with fans spinning to spray that liquid all over the inside of the case!
    Reply
  • King_V
    Is this a problem that is routine enough that you expect all PC cases to address it?
    Reply
  • deesider
    Geef said:
    There is a damn good reason for NOT allowing a side with vents. Imagine your playing a game and bump! Whoops your Pepsi just tipped over and splashed right into that vent and this case has the video card right there with fans spinning to spray that liquid all over the inside of the case!
    That's no problem buddy, the panels are removeable, just pop them straight into the dishwasher.

    If it happens alot, maybe invest in some sort of GPU diaper for those little accidents
    Reply
  • Geef
    King_V said:
    Is this a problem that is routine enough that you expect all PC cases to address it?
    No, only the ones who expect business from myself and other folks who have thought of it.
    Reply
  • Questors
    Geef said:
    There is a damn good reason for NOT allowing a side with vents. Imagine your playing a game and bump! Whoops your Pepsi just tipped over and splashed right into that vent and this case has the video card right there with fans spinning to spray that liquid all over the inside of the case!

    Have you tried moving the drink away from the PC chassis? If you are clumsy like me and constantly knock things over, this prevents the liquid contents from spilling into or onto your PC. There are also many covered drinking cup solutions on the market from 99 cents all the way up to several hundred dollars depending on your tastes and wallet. Some cups offer the benefit of keeping your drink cold or hot for a much longer time.

    Then again, all products are not for all people. ITX chassis is lesson in packing as much as one can into a small space. Air flow or cooling, in general, is paramount. Even if the case will accept an AIO and the builder uses one, there are other components that needs cooling. A bottled up ITX case is bad news even more so than a larger case.

    As for the case, it is very nice really and has been thoughtfully designed. It is now one of the few being considered for the wife's new build. That is IF GPU availability improves and prices come down.
    Reply
  • escksu
    Geef said:
    There is a damn good reason for NOT allowing a side with vents. Imagine your playing a game and bump! Whoops your Pepsi just tipped over and splashed right into that vent and this case has the video card right there with fans spinning to spray that liquid all over the inside of the case!

    Hope you know that without those vents, the GPU will overheat due to lack of ventilation. The fans will not be able to work because its only 1cm or less from the panels.

    If there are no vents, only blower style coolers will work because hot air is expelled out of the rear of the casing instead of within.
    Reply
  • Findecanor
    Geef said:
    There is a damn good reason for NOT allowing a side with vents. Imagine your playing a game and bump! Whoops your Pepsi just tipped over and splashed right into that vent and this case has the video card right there with fans spinning to spray that liquid all over the inside of the case!
    If you're right-handed, place the PC on the left side of the desk, and keep your drinks on the right side of the desk with monitor and keyboard in the middle.
    Reply