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Patriot Viper VP4100 M.2 NVMe SSD Review: Wicked Fast With an Edgy Design

Patriot's Viper is ready to strike

Editor's Choice
(Image: © Tom's Hardware)

Our Verdict

Patriot’s Viper VP4100 is a wicked fast PCIe 4.0 x4 M.2 NVMe SSD that features an edgy looking and efficient heatsink. If you are a gamer or a prosumer that wants a high-end SSD, be sure to check this SSD out.

For

  • Solid performance
  • Large write cache
  • Power-efficient
  • Effective heatsink

Against

  • Costly
  • Blue PCB

Thanks to the addition of PCIe 4.0, AMD has one-upped Intel and enables enthusiasts the opportunity to deck out their systems with some of the fastest flash ever. If you recently upgraded to AMD’s latest-gen X570 motherboards, you are well equipped to handle what we’re going to show you today.

The Viper VP4100 is a high-end SSD through and through. The drive is one of the fastest SSDs in terms of sequential performance, and yet it is just a fraction of the size of your typical hard drive. Enabled by a Phison E16 PCIe 4.0 x4 NVMe controller and Kioxia’s (formerly Toshiba Memory) BiCS4 TLC, it can handle large file transfers without a sweat.

Specifications

ProductViper VP4100 1TBViper VP4100 2TB
Pricing$219.99$439.99
Capacity (User / Raw)1000GB / 1024GB2000GB / 2048GB
Form FactorM.2 2280M.2 2280
Interface / ProtocolPCIe 4.0 x4 / NVMe 1.3PCIe 4.0 x4 / NVMe 1.3
ControllerPhison PS5016-E16Phison PS5016-E16
DRAMDDR4DDR4
MemoryToshiba 96L TLCToshiba 96L TLC
Sequential Read5,000 MBps5,000 MBps
Sequential Write4,400 MBps4,400 MBps
Random Read800,000 IOPS800,000 IOPS
Random Write800,000 IOPS800,000 IOPS
EncryptionN/AN/A
Endurance1,800 TBW3,600 TBW
Part NumberVP4100-1TBM28HVP4100-2TBM28H
Warranty5-Years5-Years

The VP4100 comes in capacities of 1TB and 2TB. Patriot rates sequential performance at up to 5.5/4.4 GBps read/write, and random performance stretches up to 800,000 read/write IOPS. 

As a result, the drive commands a premium price. The 1TB model retails for $219.99 while the 2TB model lands at $439.99. The drives also come with high endurance ratings of 1,800TB for the 1TB model and 3,600TB for the 2TB model.

Unlike Corsair’s Force MP600, however, the VP4100 does not feature hardware-accelerated AES 256-bit encryption support. But it does come with the standard support S.M.A.R.T. data reporting, trim support, and you can secure erase the drive via the Format NVM command.

Software and Accessories

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

Patriot provides a rather basic toolbox, but it lets you monitor your drive’s S.M.A.R.T. data, update firmware, and run the secure erase command. And, unlike Corsair’s SSD Toolbox, Patriot’s actually issues a proper secure erase instead of just overwriting the drive.

A Closer Look

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Patriot’s Viper VP4100 is an M.2 2280 form factor SSD. Unfortunately, the VP4100 features a blue PCB rather than black, but Patriot manufactured it with an edgy looking heatsink that efficiently cools the SSD when it is under load.

We don’t recommend trying to pull the heatsink off, as the adhesive is very strong, and you can rather easily damage the drive. 

Peeling back the heatsink, we see Phison’s E16 PCIe 4.0 x4 NVMe 1.3 controller. The E16 is similar to the company’s E12 controller, only it comes with support for the newer and faster PCIe 4.0 interface, features a newer LDPC ECC algorithm, and interfaces with Kioxia’s BiCS4 96L TLC flash. The NAND dies on our 2TB sample are 512Gbit in density, while the 1TB features a lower density 256Gbit die. This helps to balance performance between the two capacities. 

MORE: Best SSDs

MORE: How We Test HDDs And SSDs

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  • nofanneeded
    Companies need to focus on IOPS , the Sequential performance is not that important over 3500MB/s it is more than enough , and external device cant touch that speed today so copying and pasting large files at 5000MB/s is not even utilized ...

    Focus on IOPS ... PLEASE.
    Reply
  • nitrium
    Is there a reason you dropped the Adata XPG SX8200 Pro from all the comparisons charts? Seems especially strange given it's supposedly Tom's Hardware favourite SSD?
    Reply
  • seanwebster
    nitrium said:
    Is there a reason you dropped the Adata XPG SX8200 Pro from all the comparisons charts? Seems especially strange given it's supposedly Tom's Hardware favourite SSD?
    I didn’t have the 2TB sample at the time. I did include the HP EX950 though. It features the same hardware, so the performance should be similar.
    But, for a more accurate measure, I have just received the 2TB SX8200 Pro in the mail and will be posting up some updated benches with both of these SSDs soon.
    Reply
  • urbanman2004
    Glad I bought myself a Ryzen rig to witness such greatness 😎
    Reply
  • daglesj
    nofanneeded said:
    Companies need to focus on IOPS , the Sequential performance is not that important over 3500MB/s it is more than enough , and external device cant touch that speed today so copying and pasting large files at 5000MB/s is not even utilized ...

    Focus on IOPS ... PLEASE.


    Not to mention OS/File System improvements to better handle tens of thousands of micro files without dropping to KBps data rates. Shifting video data etc. is no biggie. It's microfiles that are the real killer today.
    Reply