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Riotoro Onyx 650W PSU Review

Load Regulation, Hold-Up Time & Inrush Current

To learn more about our PSU tests and methodology, please check out How We Test Power Supply Units. 

Primary Rails And 5VSB Load Regulation

Load Regulation testing is detailed here.

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Hold-Up Time

Our hold-up time tests are described in detail here.

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The hold-up time we measured is ridiculously low. GW uses low-capacity bulk caps to save a few bucks, resulting in a hold-up time lower than 8ms. As a point of reference, the ATX spec requires at least 17ms. This is a major downside for this PSU. Great Wall should have used bulk caps with at least double the capacity.

Inrush Current

For details on our inrush current testing, please click here.

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The small NTC thermistor does an average job in restricting the inrush currents.

Load Regulation And Efficiency Measurements

The first set of tests reveals the stability of the voltage rails and the PR-BP0650-SM's efficiency. The applied load equals (approximately) 10 to 110 percent of the PSU's maximum load in increments of 10 percentage points.

We conducted two additional tests. During the first, we stressed the two minor rails (5V and 3.3V) with a high load, while the load at +12V was only 0.1A. This test reveals whether a PSU is compatible with Intel's C6/C7 sleep states or not. In the second test, we determined the maximum load the +12V rail could handle with minimal load on the minor rails. 

Test #12V5V3.3V5VSBDC/AC (Watts)EfficiencyFan SpeedFan NoiseTemps (In/Out)PF/AC Volts
13.595A1.985A1.989A0.984A64.74983.209%1560 RPM32.8 dB(A)38.58°C0.974
12.017V5.028V3.316V5.053V77.81539.50°C115.16V
28.239A2.982A2.987A1.190A129.73687.792%1595 RPM33.6 dB(A)38.99°C0.968
12.003V5.018V3.308V5.040V147.77739.94°C115.15V
313.242A3.497A3.513A1.390A194.88388.790%1680 RPM35.2 dB(A)39.80°C0.976
11.991V5.010V3.299V5.028V219.48741.08°C115.15V
418.242A3.998A4.007A1.595A259.72488.914%1765 RPM36.6 dB(A)39.87°C0.981
11.980V5.002V3.292V5.013V292.10741.43°C115.15V
522.909A5.008A5.027A1.800A324.68788.578%1870 RPM38.9 dB(A)40.33°C0.984
11.969V4.990V3.283V4.998V366.55441.92°C115.14V
627.586A6.026A6.045A2.004A389.65788.070%1870 RPM38.9 dB(A)40.92°C0.986
11.958V4.980V3.273V4.984V442.44042.79°C115.14V
732.272A7.040A7.075A2.209A454.57987.360%1870 RPM38.9 dB(A)42.01°C0.987
11.946V4.970V3.264V4.969V520.35444.27°C115.14V
836.960A8.068A8.109A2.419A519.50086.465%1870 RPM38.9 dB(A)43.10°C0.989
11.935V4.960V3.254V4.952V600.82345.68°C115.14V
942.091A8.584A8.654A2.425A584.51685.561%1870 RPM38.9 dB(A)44.05°C0.991
11.925V4.952V3.246V4.941V683.15547.14°C115.14V
1046.979A9.103A9.178A3.046A649.32584.361%1870 RPM38.9 dB(A)45.22°C0.992
11.913V4.943V3.236V4.914V769.69548.96°C115.14V
1152.470A9.122A9.198A3.053A714.18283.258%1870 RPM38.9 dB(A)45.94°C0.992
11.902V4.934V3.229V4.905V857.78949.96°C115.14V
CL10.099A16.027A16.004A0.000A133.60881.588%1870 RPM38.9 dB(A)42.75°C0.972
11.989V4.987V3.280V5.035V163.75944.86°C115.18V
CL254.112A1.002A1.001A1.001A658.40485.081%1870 RPM38.9 dB(A)44.49°C0.992
11.923V4.966V3.260V4.982V773.85847.66°C115.15V

Load regulation at +12V is tight enough for this category. It's merely decent on the other rails, since at 5V and 3.3V our measurements fall within 3%.

Despite the 40°C rating, this PSU doesn't seem to have a problem delivering its full load (and even more) under very high ambient temperatures and for prolonged periods of time. The fan profile is quite aggressive at high temperatures and loads though; from our fifth test onward, the fan spins at full speed. Nonetheless, the output noise is below 40 dB(A), so it isn't that loud.

Great Wall's platform easily satisfies the 80 PLUS Bronze specification's requirements since it is based on a modern design.


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  • turkey3_scratch
    I don't think it's so much the aggressiveness of the fan that contributes to the noise rather than the fact that it's just a noisy fan. There are many other fans that could be spinning at equal RPM and be much quieter while providing the same amount of cooling.
    Then again, the noise should not be too severe of a deal in a computer case with other fans (such as case fans at 100% always) contributing more significantly to the net noise.

    Edit: Nevermind, dope move by me. I didn't realize the y axis started at 1400RPM, yep, that fan RPM is very high indeed.
    Reply
  • Ne0Wolf7
    20135612 said:
    I don't think it's so much the aggressiveness of the fan that contributes to the noise rather than the fact that it's just a noisy fan. There are many other fans that could be spinning at equal RPM and be much quieter while providing the same amount of cooling.

    Then again, the noise should not be too severe of a deal in a computer case with other fans (such as case fans at 100% always) contributing more significantly to the net noise.

    I agree, especially when you're like me and have six of them because you were obsessed with filling all of the fan slots on your first build (lol). When the noise finally got to me, I got creative with my intake/ output configuration, and set my PSU to ECO mode (which is no fan). The PSU started roasting, so I rebooted with the fan going and noticed no noise difference whatsoever and the PSU was much cooler (then again, my case fans are sleeve bearing, but still).
    Reply
  • turkey3_scratch
    20135670 said:
    20135612 said:
    I don't think it's so much the aggressiveness of the fan that contributes to the noise rather than the fact that it's just a noisy fan. There are many other fans that could be spinning at equal RPM and be much quieter while providing the same amount of cooling.

    Then again, the noise should not be too severe of a deal in a computer case with other fans (such as case fans at 100% always) contributing more significantly to the net noise.

    I agree, especially when you're like me and have six of them because you were obsessed with filling all of the fan slots on your first build (lol). When the noise finally got to me, I got creative with my intake/ output configuration, and set my PSU to ECO mode (which is no fan). The PSU started roasting, so I rebooted with the fan going and noticed no noise difference whatsoever and the PSU was much cooler (then again, my case fans are sleeve bearing, but still).

    I have a build with like 6 fans that gets noisy because the motherboard only supports so many fans, so I have to plug them into the PSU. But I also have a second build that is dead silent with some Noctuas, and that's the type of build I would want a very silent or at least semi-passive PSU in.
    Reply
  • Ne0Wolf7
    20135678 said:
    20135670 said:
    20135612 said:
    I don't think it's so much the aggressiveness of the fan that contributes to the noise rather than the fact that it's just a noisy fan. There are many other fans that could be spinning at equal RPM and be much quieter while providing the same amount of cooling.

    Then again, the noise should not be too severe of a deal in a computer case with other fans (such as case fans at 100% always) contributing more significantly to the net noise.

    I agree, especially when you're like me and have six of them because you were obsessed with filling all of the fan slots on your first build (lol). When the noise finally got to me, I got creative with my intake/ output configuration, and set my PSU to ECO mode (which is no fan). The PSU started roasting, so I rebooted with the fan going and noticed no noise difference whatsoever and the PSU was much cooler (then again, my case fans are sleeve bearing, but still).

    I have a build with like 6 fans that gets noisy because the motherboard only supports so many fans, so I have to plug them into the PSU. But I also have a second build that is dead silent with some Noctuas, and that's the type of build I would want a very silent or at least semi-passive PSU in.
    My ATX motherboard only has two fan headers, not sure who was in charge there, haha, but I bought two three way splitters so I could control the speeds. My side panel has two fan slots, and I can only use one of them because the CPU cooler, so I just have this lovely outlet for sound... Its really a blessing too beacsue I have two GPUs so one can never be tarved for air too much but still. A new case and fans are in my future somewhere.
    Reply
  • takeshi7
    Can you review the Rosewill Hive 750W? I got one on sale for $60 recently and there aren't any recent reviews for it, and not from any that are as in depth as Tom's Hardware.
    Reply
  • James Mason
    @takeshi7, there aren't new reviews for it because it isn't a new PSU.
    Reply
  • takeshi7
    20143641 said:
    @takeshi7, there aren't new reviews for it because it isn't a new PSU.
    It's still relevant though. Especially because it's cheaper, more powerful, and has the same 80 Plus rating as this Riotoro unit.
    Reply
  • turkey3_scratch
    20144799 said:
    20143641 said:
    @takeshi7, there aren't new reviews for it because it isn't a new PSU.
    It's still relevant though. Especially because it's cheaper, more powerful, and has the same 80 Plus rating as this Riotoro unit.

    "More powerful" can be interpreted many ways. What do you mean by that?
    Reply
  • takeshi7
    20144830 said:
    20144799 said:
    20143641 said:
    @takeshi7, there aren't new reviews for it because it isn't a new PSU.
    It's still relevant though. Especially because it's cheaper, more powerful, and has the same 80 Plus rating as this Riotoro unit.

    "More powerful" can be interpreted many ways. What do you mean by that?
    I mean 750W > 650W.
    Reply
  • turkey3_scratch
    20144901 said:
    20144830 said:
    20144799 said:
    20143641 said:
    @takeshi7, there aren't new reviews for it because it isn't a new PSU.
    It's still relevant though. Especially because it's cheaper, more powerful, and has the same 80 Plus rating as this Riotoro unit.

    "More powerful" can be interpreted many ways. What do you mean by that?
    I mean 750W > 650W.

    Eh, doesn't really mean much of anything if you ask me. It's just what they decided to rate it at. I don't think we'll ever see a Rosewill Hive review. They're older and newer units get reviewed instead.

    A high quality lower wattage power supply can be more powerful than a lesser quality higher wattage power supply.
    Reply