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SilverStone Strider Platinum ST85F-PT PSU Review

SilverStone's Strider Platinum series offers compact dimensions along with Platinum efficiency and a fully modular cable design. The 850W member of this line will be evaluated today. Its strong card against the competition is the 471W power density score.

Packaging, Contents, Exterior, And Cabling

Packaging

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A photo of the PSU along with its model number and a large 80 PLUS Platinum badge are found on the front of the box. There is also a small list of the PSU's most interesting features. The technical and power specification tables are depicted on one of the box's sides, while the other side hosts a graphical list showing all available connectors. It would be helpful if SilverStone also shared cable length information, in addition to the connector count. On the back of the box you get the efficiency and fan speed curves, a diagram of the modular sockets, and another one showing the unit's dimensions compared to a "normal" 850 W PSU.

Contents

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Two thick packing foam sheets provide ample protection. It is always good to see highly protective packages, since this is the safest way to minimize the chances of a defective PSU due to rough shipping conditions. There is nothing worse than wasting time building a PC, only to find that a component doesn't work as it should. In general, we strongly advise checking to see if your PSU if it is working normally using an affordable PSU tester like this one before installing it.

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SilverStone's bundle is rich enough; it includes zip-ties, Velcro straps, two sets of fixing bolts (one of them with thumbscrews), two manuals, the AC power cord, and the modular cables.

Exterior

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A yellow ribbon around the PSU lets you know that the fan won't spin until a certain load is applied or a specific temperature is reached. Unfortunately, this PSU's semi-passive mode relies heavily on the applied load, which can lead to problems in some extreme cases. On top of that, it would be ideal if the semi-passive function could be deactivated. We'd also like a way to gauge whether the fan is operating properly. Some manufacturers provide a fan-test button or have the fan spin briefly each time the PSU starts. Sirfa doesn't do any of that. At least over-temperature protection will step in if the fan breaks down.

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The power specification table is on one of the PSU's sides. On the bottom, SilverStone's logo is stamped into the enclosure.

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The modular panel hosts 12 sockets, three more than the ST75F-PT. The four blue ones are for the PCIe cables, so the number of corresponding connectors can be increased if you get cables hosting two PCIe sockets each.

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SilverStone's aesthetic leaves something to be desired due to the off-center fan. However, the finish is of decent quality and there is a power switch, which some SilverStone PSUs manufactured by Enhance Electronics lack. Thankfully, Sirfa doesn't cut corners when it comes to power switches.

Cabling

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This PSU uses stealth and flat cables. Their quality is pretty good, and they are flexible enough to allow for easy routing inside of a case.

  • panathas
    I don't understand, first you said: "On the other hand, it doesn't have an issue with inaccurate power-good signals that last longer than the corresponding hold-up time" and your last words were: "It is a great shame though that it is affected by the inaccurate power good signal disease". Which one is true? Also in the CONS section you only mentioned the Hold-up time and not the power good signal.
    Reply
  • turkey3_scratch
    18699506 said:
    I don't understand, first you said: "On the other hand, it doesn't have an issue with inaccurate power-good signals that last longer than the corresponding hold-up time" and your last words were: "It is a great shame though that it is affected by the inaccurate power good signal disease". Which one is true? Also in the CONS section you only mentioned the Hold-up time and not the power good signal.

    First one must have been an mistake since it does drop the PWR_OK after the voltages are already out of spec.
    Reply
  • Aris_Mp
    Yes something was way out in this phrase. It is fixed now.

    This PSU is affected by a fake power good signal, which usually is the case in Sirfa's platform.

    In the cons section. Sometimes I don't mention the fake power good signal, when the hold-up time is already too low. But I will make sure that I do from now on.
    Reply
  • Virtual_Singularity
    ty for the review. So, I know it's kind of not really adequate for comparison considering the watt difference. But, looking at the performance of that last Lian Li sfx reviewed, and this thing, still must say that LL didn't do so badly, though they could really help things if they extended that warranty by at least a year or more.
    Reply
  • DotNetMaster777
    SilverStone looks nice taking into account that this is compact dimensions ?!
    Reply
  • Co BIY
    I think the exterior photos need something for scale. Full-size black boxes and tiny high efficiency black boxes look the same size on a screen without something for scale.

    No comment on vacant modular socket plugs. First time I've seen that. Also the copper bars aren't a feature I've seen commented on before.
    Reply