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Intel Core i9-9900KS Reportedly Hits 5.2 GHz

Update: We have exclusive pre-release testing of the Core i9-9900KS here.

A Redditor that goes by the FR33_L35T3R alias purportedly managed to pick up the Intel Core i9-9900KS before its official launch and overclocked the special edition chip to 5.2 GHz.

Intel Core i9-9900KS

Intel Core i9-9900KS

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

Although Intel has stated that the Core i9-9900KS will hit the shelves this month, the chipmaker hasn't listed a specific date. Supposedly an unidentified Czech Republic store listed the octa-core part by mistake, which allowed the Redditor to buy it prematurely. The store has taken down the listing to avoid any future purchases.

The Redditor paired the Core i9-9900KS with the Asus ROG Maximus XI Hero (Wi-Fi) and a pair of Patriot DDR4-2666 memory modules. He did not specify the type of cooling used, but judging by the temperatures, it's possible a CPU air cooler was employed.

As a quick reminder, the Core i9-9900KS has a 4 GHz base clock and 5 GHz all-core boost clock. The novice overclocker pushed his chip to 5.2 GHz on all eight cores by just increasing the core and cache voltage to 1.36V.

Intel Core i9-9900KS at 5.2 GHz

Intel Core i9-9900KS at 5.2 GHz

(Image credit: FR33_L35T3R)

The overclocked Intel Core i9-9900KS scored 5,356 points in Cinebench R20. In our own Core i9-9900K tests, the current -9900K put up a score of 4,984 points at stock. When overclocked to 5 GHz to behave like a stock Core i9-9900KS, the processor scores 5,266 points. 

If we look at the result, the Core i9-9900KS performs roughly around 5.7% faster than a regular Core i9-9900K - at least in Cinebench R20. At 5.2 GHz, the Core i9-9900KS pushes the difference to 7.5%. Compared to the stock clocks, we're looking at a 1.7% gain.

B&H Photo previously listed the Core i9-9900KS for $559.99, which commands a $70 premium over the original Core i9-9900K. We're already halfway through the month, so it won't be long before Core i9-9900KS starts popping up everywhere.

  • AlistairAB
    And my 9700k works perfectly at 5.3ghz and 1.39V. This doesn't mean anything. The 9900k already worked fine at 5.2ghz, so the KS model is exactly the same. The issue isn't voltage levels, the issue is overall power draw. Over 250W of power can be required at some 5Ghz+ speeds, so basically nothing can cool the chip under sustained load. I use a Noctua U14S and it goes straight to 100 degrees eventually. I can do Cinebench no problem, but try looping it for an hour.
    Reply
  • King_V
    So, $559.99 for this chip, which is $70 more than the non-S. Thus the non-S is $489.99.

    So about 18.4% more money to get a 1.7% performance gain at stock clocks? And, sure, as much as 7.5% if pushed to 5.2GHz, but that sounds like it's compared to a non-overclocked non-S chip. That margin decreases, presumably, if you overclock the non-S.

    I don't see the point of paying that much more for it.
    Reply
  • TheToi
    He used the noctua nh-d15 for cooling.

    Source : (he answered to author)
    intel/comments/dhxvj5View: https://www.reddit.com/r/intel/comments/dhxvj5/9900ks_just_appeared_on_userbenchmark/
    Reply
  • Ninjawithagun
    People reportedly don't care about what Intel does anymore :LOL:
    Reply
  • Redneck5439
    Personally I'm not impressed. 5.2Ghz all core overclock and only 5356 points in Cinebench R20.... That isn't a good score for such high frequency. I get 5420 points in Cinebench R20 with my Ryzen 3800X and its only clocked at 4.425Ghz (fastest CCX clocked at 4.45Ghz) all core. So the "powerful", "best gaming CPU" has to hit frequencies of over 700Mhz more to have lower rendering performance? The 3800X is a $400 CPU, the 9900KS is $560... $160 more for a hotter running, more power hungry CPU that has less performance? For Intel's sake that hopefully was an early engineering sample.

    https://www.overclock.net/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=300384&d=1570840355
    Reply
  • AlistairAB
    TheToi said:
    He used the noctua nh-d15 for cooling.

    Source : (he answered to author)
    intel/comments/dhxvj5View: https://www.reddit.com/r/intel/comments/dhxvj5/9900ks_just_appeared_on_userbenchmark/

    Exactly. You basically have to buy the largest cooler possible to cool those frequencies. I would have been happy to see it sell for the SAME price as the 9900k, but with an increase in price for an already overpriced chip (if you MUST buy Intel just get the 9700k instead), it is getting silly. shrugs ... I actually thought the 8700k was a great chip as the price didn't go up, and the power consumption was under control (the 8700k unlike the 9900k doesn't use double the power AMD's chips use), but the 9900k has always struck me as a terrible purchase.
    Reply
  • Redneck5439
    AlistairAB said:
    Exactly. You basically have to buy the largest cooler possible to cool those frequencies. I would have been happy to see it sell for the SAME price as the 9900k, but with an increase in price for an already overpriced chip (if you MUST buy Intel just get the 9700k instead), it is getting silly. shrugs ... I actually thought the 8700k was a great chip as the price didn't go up, and the power consumption was under control (the 8700k unlike the 9900k doesn't use double the power AMD's chips use), but the 9900k has always struck me as a terrible purchase.

    And if memory serves, the 9700K has 98-99% of the gaming performance of the 9900K. There are only a few titles that scale well enough to take advantage of the extra threads you get with the 9900K. For pure gaming I get better performance in a lot of games by turning off SMT (hyperthreading), running 8 cores, 8 threads and increasing the frequency more. For productivity the extra threads are needed badly.
    Reply
  • AlistairAB
    Redneck5439 said:
    And if memory serves, the 9700K has 98-99% of the gaming performance of the 9900K. There are only a few titles that scale well enough to take advantage of the extra threads you get with the 9900K. For pure gaming I get better performance in a lot of games by turning off SMT (hyperthreading), running 8 cores, 8 threads and increasing the frequency more. For productivity the extra threads are needed badly.

    Yeap. Get the 9700k for max ST performance, or buy AMD right now is how I see it. I bought and returned a 9900k just to check, I got 200mhz higher OC with my 9700k, so I saved myself over 200 dollars and got MORE performance in gaming, as SMT doesn't matter much, and single threaded performance is more frequency dependent than anything else (though Intel nerfed the cache a bit on purpose to try to retain some interest in the 9900k vs the 9700k, made up by the extra 200mhz easily).
    Reply
  • Redneck5439
    AlistairAB said:
    Yeap. Get the 9700k for max ST performance, or buy AMD right now is how I see it. I bought and returned a 9900k just to check, I got 200mhz higher OC with my 9700k, so I saved myself over 200 dollars and got MORE performance in gaming, as SMT doesn't matter much, and single threaded performance is more frequency dependent than anything else (though Intel nerfed the cache a bit on purpose to try to retain some interest in the 9900k vs the 9700k, made up by the extra 200mhz easily).

    Totally agree with you. The only reason I went with Ryzen over something like the 9700K was that I need the extra threads as I do a lot of "productivity" based applications. I do a fair amount of rendering/ editing/ converting video and the extra HP with SMT comes in very handy.

    I am really impressed with Ryzen 3000 and the 3800X. On early bios I wasn't getting the performance I was really hoping for and really had times I wished I had gone with the 9900K, but with every agesa/ bios update the performance has increased and the overclocking has gotten better. On release bios the 3800X could only hit 4.3Ghz all core on around 1.4V, with the latest bios I'm running better than 4.4Ghz (each CCX module can be overclocked individually) and am using 1.33V. My Cinebench R20 score is 5420, my Geekbench score is 1346 SC and 10667 MC, my blender score is 204.4 BMW and 670 classroom and my best Time Spy CPU score is 10722. From what I have seen the 9900K would have to be clocked at 5Ghz to get around the same performance.

    For gaming and gaming alone, it is really hard to argue against the 9700K. Its very solid, has great price to performance and incredible overclocking ability. In gaming it is really hard to beat.
    Reply
  • joeblowsmynose
    AlistairAB said:
    Exactly. You basically have to buy the largest cooler possible to cool those frequencies. I would have been happy to see it sell for the SAME price as the 9900k, but with an increase in price for an already overpriced chip (if you MUST buy Intel just get the 9700k instead), it is getting silly. shrugs ... I actually thought the 8700k was a great chip as the price didn't go up, and the power consumption was under control (the 8700k unlike the 9900k doesn't use double the power AMD's chips use), but the 9900k has always struck me as a terrible purchase.

    Yeah I see some articles and commenters noting how wonderful it is this can "OC to 5.3 on air!". That cooler is better than the majority of 240mm AIOs. 83 degrees is acceptable, but cinebench is a very short run.

    The problems with the 9900 series is they can't boost for very long and I imagine the KS variant is no better in this regard. I would like to see the chip tested in sustained 16thread workloads and see if it can compare with a 3800x or 3900x for those type of loads @ 5.3. (just to see if its all core (more than two minute) boosting behaviour is any improvement over 9900k. Not that I'll ever buy one, just curious.

    But sadly most people who buy this will be gamers, paying extra money for extra cores and threads they will never use ... so maybe the cooling and boosting will never be a problem for them because they'll never be using the CPU to any actual capacity.

    Save you money people and get a better GPU ... CPUs that aren't bottlenecked (AKA paired with a 2080ti @ 1080p - pretty much any other combo will not bottlenck any CPU).

    9700k makes so much more sense for gamers who want to play with a bottlenecked CPU.
    Reply