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Micron to Sell 3D XPoint Memory Fab and Cease Further Development (Updated)

3D XPoint

(Image credit: Intel)

Update: We've added responses from both Intel and Micron to the article below:

Micron announced today that it is selling its 3D XPoint fab in Lehi, Utah, bringing an end to its production of the radical new memory technology that it developed with Intel. The company plans to sell the fab by the end of 2021 and exit the 3D XPoint business entirely.

Micron will cease all further development of 3D XPoint-based products due to lackluster demand that the company says has "insufficient market validation to justify the ongoing high levels of investments required to successfully commercialize 3D XPoint at scale." The company recently divulged that it lost $400 million this year alone due to the lack of demand for 3D XPoint.

Intel and Micron developed the revolutionary 3D XPoint persistent memory, which melds the speed and endurance of DRAM with the persistence of data storage devices, in a secret joint effort that spanned a decade. The first formal announcement came in 2015.

Intel and Micron dissolved the joint development effort in 2018, with Micron buying out Intel's share of the business for $1.5 billion. Intel continues to use 3D XPoint as the underlying storage medium for its Optane products but has long relied upon Micron for its supply of 3D XPoint. The two companies have a supply agreement that lasts until the end of the year.

Micron issued the following statement to Tom's Hardware:

"Micron is committed to completing our obligations under the existing wafer supply agreement with Intel, which currently goes through the end of CY21, and Micron intends to retain all of its intellectual property associated with 3D XPoint."

Intel also fabs its own 3D XPoint media in a New Mexico fab, but it's unclear how much volume the company currently produces. While Intel is in the process of selling its own NAND flash and SSD businesses to SK hynix, it's fully possible that it could be a potential suitor to purchase Micron's Utah fab. Intel certainly has a vested interest in ensuring the supply of the memory because it is the key underlying technology in several of its differentiated data center offerings. 

Intel responded to our queries on the matter, stating, "Micron's announcement doesn't change our strategy for Intel Optane or our ability to supply Intel Optane products to our customers."

Intel's own efforts to productize Optane, which uses the 3D XPoint media, have met with slow but steady uptake in the data center but fizzled in the consumer market. As such, Intel ceased production of all Optane devices for desktop PCs in January 2021. The company continues to develop both storage and persistent memory DIMMs for the enterprise markets. In fact, Intel recently unveiled its new Optane SSD P5800X for servers. This new device brings second-gen Optane to market for the first time, signaling that Intel remains committed to using the exotic memory for the enterprise market.

Micron announced several of its own storage devices based on 3D XPoint memory, like the QuantX and X100, but they never came to market, leaving Intel as the sole supplier of 3D XPoint-based products. 

Micron says that it will shift its focus to developing memory products that support the Compute Express Link (CXL) standard, an open memory standard that ties together disparate pools of memory and compute. Micron says it "plans to apply the knowledge it has gained from the breakthroughs achieved through its 3D XPoint initiative, as well as related engineering expertise and resources, to new types of memory-centric products that target the memory-storage hierarchy." 

Paul Alcorn

Paul Alcorn is the Deputy Managing Editor for Tom's Hardware US. He writes news and reviews on CPUs, storage and enterprise hardware.

  • Kamen Rider Blade
    =::::::::::::(
    Reply
  • Chung Leong
    Hopefully Intel will buy the fab then start adding support for persistent RAM to their consumer CPUs.
    Reply
  • eklipz330
    the death of an incredible technology. sucks.
    Reply
  • Dsplover
    Just waiting for the 905P 960GB M.2 to drop.
    I use a mixed batch of seq reads and random seeks.
    Would love to see the effect of the high random seeks and extra low latency these offer. Just not at the current price.
    Reply
  • cyrusfox
    Dsplover said:
    Just waiting for the 905P 960GB M.2 to drop.
    I use a mixed batch of seq reads and random seeks.
    Would love to see the effect of the high random seeks and extra low latency these offer. Just not at the current price.
    As far as I can tell they never released an M.2 drive above the capacity of the M.2 380 GB. If you want large capacities need to go with U.2 or PCIE card for that size.
    Reply
  • Dsplover
    SSD w/ M.2 adapter. My bad.
    Reply
  • escksu
    Dsplover said:
    Just waiting for the 905P 960GB M.2 to drop.
    I use a mixed batch of seq reads and random seeks.
    Would love to see the effect of the high random seeks and extra low latency these offer. Just not at the current price.

    I have to tell you that you won't see a big increase in performance. Although the 905P does perform very well on benchmarks, you won't see your programs loading 2x faster or anything like that. You will only see a slight increase instead.

    This is due to inefficient nature of windows I/O itself. So, hardware can't overcome this inefficiency.
    Reply
  • Dsplover
    My programs are loaded into RAM like the OS.
    Everything else is streamed from an NVMe or SSD.
    The target buffers are RAM based, so the extra random seeks would increase my polyphony.

    I get decent results as is, but when I use high polyphony voice stacking sometimes there are dropouts.

    We use to avoid this years ago by having multiple 10k Cheetah SCSI Drives.
    The theory was more seeks, more polyphony.

    SSDs changed that to a degree. I think the extra dough might alleviate these occasional Pops. I’m the only one who would likely hear that, but I do strive for perfection.

    Cheerz
    Reply
  • danlw
    Sounds like 3DXpoint is going to join things like IPv6 and Dvorak on the ash heap of great ideas that didn't get adopted because the older technology is too entrenched for the change to actually happen.
    Reply
  • Kamen Rider Blade
    3DXP totally deserves to be the dominant drive for OS usage only across the industry.

    Too bad Intel pushed it in the wrong way and tried to fit it into a niche to combat NAND Flash directly.

    It's super low latency and consistent latency regardless of how full the 3DXP drive gets should be pushed and marketed as a OS Drive.

    Doesn't matter that their cost per GB is higher than regular NAND Flash.

    Normal productivity programs and OSes don't need that much space.

    Games can be shunted onto the NAND Flash drive.

    Regular NAND flash has a perfect place as fast & expensive storage.

    HDD's are Cheap & Slower Bulk storage.
    Reply