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Asus ROG Swift PG27V 27" Curved Gaming Monitor Review: A Gaming Sweet Spot?

Conclusion

So, what makes a gaming monitor great? A high refresh rate and adaptive sync are no-brainers. Once you’ve experienced those two things, there’s no going back to tor frames at 60Hz. Pixel density is certainly important, and we agree that the more dots you can pack into the rectangle, the better. But that requires more power from the graphics card side. A more-expensive monitor begs for a more-expensive video card. Contrast and color accuracy, while not a priority to everyone, are also key to the experience. Color must look natural and there should be sufficient dynamic range to create a 3D effect without compromising detail.

The Asus PG27V checks almost all the boxes. Its gaming performance is as good as it gets. Though there are faster monitors, we’ve seen little benefit to going above 165Hz. The differences in smoothness are invisible, and our input lag measurements show a gap that only a Jedi Knight would notice. This display plays games as well as the best screens we’ve reviewed. Response to control inputs is nigh-instantaneous, and objects fly around with no blur or judder.

Color accuracy is an issue here if you choose to use the monitor in its default state. The Racing mode we’ve come to appreciate in many other Asus monitors seems to have taken a step backward. Gamma is too dark and the color temperature is clearly lacking in blue. If you don’t make a few tweaks, picture quality is not up to the standard we've come to expect from a premium gaming screen. Fortunately, the fix is at hand with a switch to the 1.8 gamma preset and the warm color temp option. And with an instrumented calibration, we have no complaints about color performance at all.

Contrast is a bit below other gaming displays we’ve reviewed, especially the ones that rely on VA technology. In our opinion, that should be a must for gaming, and any other computer application for that matter. The difference between 1000:1 and 3000:1 is significant and has a major impact on image quality.

And does that TN panel really matter? While some will dismiss it outright, it didn’t bother us during testing or in actual use. The 1800R curvature takes care of light falloff and color shift issues when sitting on-center at a typical viewing distance. Yes, we’d prefer the screen were IPS or VA (or that the price would drop a bit), but it’s far from a deal-breaker. So, while the PG27V has a few flaws, it’s still a good gaming monitor. We think once you’ve fragged a few friends on it, you’ll agree.

MORE: Best Gaming Monitors

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  • fredfinks
    Curved 27"? F no.
    Curved 21:9 34" maybe. Curved 16:9, even on a 32"? Just no.
    This curve on non-ultrawide screens is an abomination. How are curved TVs working out for users? what a moronic fad. Same with the monitor spewing out RGB nonsense from the base & back. A tacky, seizure inducing 12yr old's laser show wet dream. so leet.

    You might try 100+hz and not want to go back. But try a 32" and you dont want to go back to sub 30" ever again. Even if its 10000hz.
    What im waiting for is a quality, non-curved, non-asus or acer, non-rgb, true 32" 16:9 1440p VA gysnc screen. Preferably Samsung. LG has one but its a 31.5" skimp out. It also has the RGB aids.

    A 35" 2:1 screen size ratio. If only.....
    Reply
  • BulkZerker
    G-Sync is not a pro. It's a tax for what can be used by any video card in the form of freesync.

    https://forums.guru3d.com/threads/cru-custom-resolution-utility-tips-tricks-and-monitors-oc-lcd-led-crt.410187/
    Reply
  • darkchazz
    That is crazy overpriced for a TN panel. Probably due to ROG branding + Gsync + the curve.

    Why would anyone buy this instead of the cheaper 1440p 144hz IPS (AHVA) monitors?
    Reply
  • DerekA_C
    I tested Acer and Asus, TN and IPS panels of the last gen 1440p 144hz oc to 165hz and with ULMB @ 120hz on the Predator blows all the rest out of the water. The colors and the motion on the IPS panel is better than the TN by far. Now if we could get IPS down to 2ms that would be amazing. oh btw I got my IPS Predator for $550 with literally an inch of so hard to see even in dark screen back light bleed probably one of the best I've seen even out of all the reviewers on youtube showing theirs. Not a single stuck or dead or bleached out pixel, it is almost perfect I'd say 99% I'd really love to see an IPS certified for 2ms. I think it is doable with our technology but will they release one.
    Reply
  • ddferrari
    $800 for a 27" TN panel? Pass.

    I got my 3440x1440 curved Dell Alienware monitor on sale for $940. It sports an IPS panel, 120Hz refresh rate and Gsync. I don't really see the need for a curved screen at 27", unless it is literally one foot from your face.
    Reply
  • Sam Hain
    Was going to wait for this monitor (when if ever released) but saw the reviews on Euro sites/YouTube prior to release in the U.S. and was not a "stellar-performer" especially when considering the MSRP.

    Curve and ambient lighting not worth it when compared to other similar spec (superior, same or less priced) monitors... but to some it is.
    Reply
  • Nintendork
    @FREDFINKS

    Same for me

    28-32" 1440 120Hz VA 3000:1+ ZERO CURVES, full glossy
    Reply
  • Nintendork
    Once you realize people how HORRID is to use a matter or semimatte screen with craptastic 1000:1 or less contrast ratio vs glossy high contrast VA or an OLED TV...
    Reply
  • Diji1
    Wait ... I can't use a VESA monitor arm on this thing because of ambient lighting? GTFO.

    And to me it looks as though light is going to be projected unevenly from the back because the light strip is not horizontal or centred.

    Apart from that I always disliked their downward facing ambient lighting, at least with Acer it lights your desk nicely eg X34
    Reply