Build It: Picking Parts For Your Kid's Entry-Level Gaming PC

Two Builds Call For Two Winners

We have a clear winner, but it's different depending on the build you prefer most.

Generally, we find that older games are often playable without a discrete graphics card. The current trend of game developers releasing straight console ports to the PC makes it easier for lower-performance hardware to keep up.

Accessories sold separatelyAccessories sold separately

Gaming Without Discrete Graphics: AMD, Obviously

To that end, if you're willing to go light on graphics performance and live life without a discrete GPU, you only have two real choices right now: AMD's A8-3850 and the slightly faster A8-3870. Neither the AMD A6-3650 nor Intel's CPUs with HD Graphics are good enough to play the titles with which we test, but the quicker A8s do make due with their on-die Radeon engines. Seeing that there’s not much of a price difference between AMD’s APU models, but a massive performance jump that takes games all the way from unplayable to playable, we really don’t see any reason to buy the A6-3650.

For exactly $403, our AMD A8-3850-based build provides a lot of performance. And although we don't expect your kids to compile code, transcode movies, or render graphics in 3ds Max, we know there are plenty of threaded productivity apps that favor four of AMD's x86 cores over two of Intel's. In those environments, a quad-core APU wins every time, as we saw in Battle At $140: Can An APU Beat An Intel CPU And Add-In Graphics?

We do have to mention the APU's ability to host an add-in card of comparable performance and operate in Dual Graphics mode, though. Even though this looks like a good idea on paper and in our benchmark results, in practice, we did see a lot of stuttering with both graphics processors rendering cooperatively.

Gaming with Discrete Graphics: Intel

If you’re willing to spend a little more on a discrete graphics card, Intel's Pentium G620 is the way to go. It dominates in CPU-bound games and in productivity-oriented applications optimized for one or two threads.

The two slower processors from Intel and AMD perform far worse than their slightly-cheaper price tags might otherwise indicate. They're surely ample for a pure office-oriented machine, but not for any sort of gaming.

AMD's A8-3850 makes sense if you start down the path of our discrete GPU-less basic build. As a means for saving money, it performs well enough. If you shoot straight for the more advanced build, though, there's no way around Intel's Pentium G620 and an affordable Radeon HD 6670. That combination of parts, though notably faster in CPU-dependent gaming workloads, only costs about $20 more than the basic configuration, totaling $421.

Our Finished PC

We finished our build under the guidance of our client, an 11-year-old. A sound-activated cold cathode light, a better fan for the CPU, and a few stickers we had lying around made his eyes shine a little brighter. And making him happy was the point of the whole exercise. We also couldn't resist handing him a little surprise after finding a Radeon HD 7750 on sale. All told, the machine we built set us back roughly $460.

A flashy PC like this isn’t everybody’s preference, but it sure looks cool in the dark. And if there's one thing we've learned about kids of all ages, it's that they sure like flashy things.

Wrapping Up

There's a solid alternative to dropping a gaming console into your kid's room. A much more versatile PC can be had for just over $400, or even less if you have some older components gathering dust somewhere. Do you pick an APU or a CPU? Do you install discrete graphics or not? Whichever way you go, it's possible to build an adequately powerful system for a modest price.

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  • Interesting, but I'm assuming most parents that build there own computers, game and read toms hardware would be better suited just giving their kids their old gaming PC's. Since many this enthusiastic will already be replacing them every couple of years. Now they have another excuse to replace them and their kids get computers made from former high end and quality parts that are still very fast and more than capable of playing any kids games and edutacational/edutainment software.

    Although I say just give them an Apple IIe so they can learn on what we learned on in school.
    26
  • velocityg4Interesting, but I'm assuming most parents that build there own computers, game and read toms hardware would be better suited just giving their kids their old gaming PC's.

    I see the reasoning in this, however, for someone like myself I found this an interesting article; as I'm actually about to build a computer for my nieces and they do not need a fully featured gaming rig. It doesn't make sense to give them a machine that doesn't suit their needs and I'm sure many other parents/uncles/aunts are in the same boat.
    23
  • why didn't the author post the stock cooling solution temps. Personally I've always found that the stock intel cooling was both quiet and sufficient, even in mini itx cases. I'm curious how big the difference is. if the diff is just 10-15%, I don't think it's worth spending extra on a 3rd party cooler for a kids computer.
    22
  • Other Comments
  • Interesting, but I'm assuming most parents that build there own computers, game and read toms hardware would be better suited just giving their kids their old gaming PC's. Since many this enthusiastic will already be replacing them every couple of years. Now they have another excuse to replace them and their kids get computers made from former high end and quality parts that are still very fast and more than capable of playing any kids games and edutacational/edutainment software.

    Although I say just give them an Apple IIe so they can learn on what we learned on in school.
    26
  • velocityg4Interesting, but I'm assuming most parents that build there own computers, game and read toms hardware would be better suited just giving their kids their old gaming PC's.

    I see the reasoning in this, however, for someone like myself I found this an interesting article; as I'm actually about to build a computer for my nieces and they do not need a fully featured gaming rig. It doesn't make sense to give them a machine that doesn't suit their needs and I'm sure many other parents/uncles/aunts are in the same boat.
    23
  • or at that age, you could just buy an Android tablet or an overpriced iCraplet. Both probably support AngryBirds or other games and you can take them along to trips, dinners, church and other events to shut them up.
    -22
  • JOSHSKORNor at that age, you could just buy an Android tablet or an overpriced iCraplet. Both probably support AngryBirds or other games and you can take them along to trips, dinners, church and other events to shut them up.
    So show me a top of the line Android tablet that costs less than the "overpriced" iPad...
    -22
  • iCrap (something for the fashion victims & super creative types to show off whilst sipping their skinny lattes in starbucks whilst facebooking their friends about the fact that are in starbucks, having lattes, and got a new iPad / macbook)
    17
  • What *YOU* do is hand your kid the OLD computer when you upgrade. But yeah, since about the age of 1 and a half, my son has had his own PC... keeps if off ours. He did damage his CRT monitor with paint - which was somewhat cleaned up. Fine. His first was a client's out-dated Pentium III-1Ghz which he paid $2500 when it was NEW. Then he got a compaq handme down from mom.

    Today, age 7: AMD X4 CPU, 4GB RAM, ATI 4670 card I built from various parts. I use it for background work since its so powerful. He does his educational and game software on it.

    When I was age 7, the Apple II was just released and most people didn't know what one was. It wasn't until 1980 that we started seeing these $1200~3000 computers... usually in the school library with 1 or 2 units. My 1985 PC: 1-2Mhz 128k RAM, 360k floppy drive system with a monitor was $900+. I still have it and it works. I forgot how to use it.

    Suggestions when building a PC for 3~8 year olds: buy a logitech notebook mouse ($15~20) as these are smaller but perfect for little hands. Use a cheap keyboard as kids tend to be messy and destroy them. if they are real young (1~3yrs old) try to get your hands on a CRT. Harder to knock over, costs $0~5 if you can find one.

    Also, a $200~250 netbook makes a good "notebook" for young kids (4~9 years old). Or give your kid your old notebook. My kid was given a 17" notebook a friend gave away when he upgraded.
    13
  • 200652 said:
    So show me a top of the line Android tablet that costs less than the "overpriced" iPad...


    You're feeding the troll, genius. :heink:
    14
  • Leave out the bling and dedicated video card for a basic pc for grandma and grandpa! I've already built a couple for senior citizens who are not gamers.

    BTW - there is an option to dedicate some of the memory to the integrated graphics. I installed inexpensive 8GB memory and dedicated 2GB to the graphics. What I don't know is if it makes a real difference. Would that help gamers?
    2
  • JohnnyLuckyLeave out the bling and dedicated video card for a basic pc for grandma and grandpa! I've already built a couple for senior citizens who are not gamers. BTW - there is an option to dedicate some of the memory to the integrated graphics. I installed inexpensive 8GB memory and dedicated 2GB to the graphics. What I don't know is if it makes a real difference. Would that help gamers?

    More or less dependant on the speed of the RAM.
    1
  • After all that build up a cheap PSU is used based entirely on claims written on the box. No reviews exist and apparently Cooler Master knows it's junk because they haven't bothered to get it certified by 80plus.
    2
  • why didn't the author post the stock cooling solution temps. Personally I've always found that the stock intel cooling was both quiet and sufficient, even in mini itx cases. I'm curious how big the difference is. if the diff is just 10-15%, I don't think it's worth spending extra on a 3rd party cooler for a kids computer.
    22
  • 55656 said:
    After all that build up a cheap PSU is used based entirely on claims written on the box. No reviews exist and apparently Cooler Master knows it's junk because they haven't bothered to get it certified by 80plus.


    I'd just go with the Antec Earthwatts series.
    4
  • Its funny how its PC for kids and they benchmarked Gta IV, the 3850 seems the way to go better than buying and i3 or g someing and buying like GT520 as the 3850 beats the 520 in benchmarks
    3
  • The GT 520 is slower than A8-3850. Take a look at the Charts 2011 :)
    0
  • FormatCThe GT 520 is slower than A8-3850. Take a look at the Charts 2011
    "as the 3850 beats the 520 in benchmarks " read carefully
    4
  • At first: sorry
    English is for me nothing more than one foreign language and if I read over this posts quickly once...

    I found GTA (Vice City, San Andreas and/or GTA IV / EFLC) on each childs computer (boys, 10 years and older) and this old game is a good example for benchmarks, not more. Other older games are running on each toaster, if you oc'ed him from 110 to 230 Volt :D
    -7
  • nice read. :)
    interesting choice, benching gta iv for a kid's pc...lol i know it was to test platform strength.. i hope it wasn't in the pc when it was handed to him. 7750 was a very good choice.
    some people might argue why the amd apus were not overclocked so that they could outperform pentiums for gaming and the apus' higher performance in 3d rendering and pov ray tracing.. :D
    i am a bit skeptical about cm gx psu... overall good performance for money from both intel and amd builds.
    3
  • This is Cooler Master advertisement ...

    Tough Times huh Tom ...
    -5
  • 585067 said:
    This is Cooler Master advertisement ... Tough Times huh Tom ...


    No, this is what I had on matching components in my lab here, because we have recently tested these parts. This is a so-called recycling :D
    9
  • Once finished building your 'kids' PC I'd recommend cloning the finished build to another HDD and putting it away on a shelf......for a week or two later when they have messed it all up.
    8