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ECS Explains Durathon Motherboard Building Technique

ECS, otherwise known as Elitegroup Computer Systems, is announcing that it will build a number of motherboards based on its Durathon construction methods. "Durathon" is a word created by combining the words Durable and Marathon. The aim of the Durathon motherboards is to tackle the competition and give ECS a stronger position in the market.

Some of the techniques that ECS will use to create its Durathon motherboards include Triple Density PCB building, the use of extreme temperature resistant components, superior solid capacitors and a 1.5K Marathon Test.

The Triple Layer Density PCB is a bi-directional weave design with splitting glass fabric. This should reduce the air permeability and reduce vapor damage. The capacitors that ECS boasts about are "Superior Solid Capacitors." It mentions that the capacitors of the competition have a lifetime of only 32,000 hours, while its own have a lifetime of up to 200,000 hours. It also boasts that the components used can withstand temperatures up to 100˚C as opposed to 65˚C from the competition.

Now all of this actually sounds quite familiar. We've seen manufacturers such as Gigabyte, Asus, and MSI with their Ultradurable, Xtreme Design, and Military Class designs, respectively.

The only part that does impress us is the so called 1.5K Marathon test, which tests each board at 1,507 test points to ensure that before the motherboard leaves the factory, it is well-baked.

So far there has been no word about when Elitegroup Computer Systems will be releasing the motherboards, but there will be a Facebook event starting April 15, 2013 regarding the developments.

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Niels Broekhuijsen is a Contributing Writer for Tom's Hardware US. He reviews cases, water cooling and pc builds.

  • greghome
    ECS, Durable? Don't make me laugh.....
    Reply
  • ronch79
    ECS is the last thing that comes to mind when one wants reliable, durable, well designed PC components. Most folks regard them as a cheap, unreliable brand. They've been trying to improve their brand image lately, and they deserve some kudos for it. I wish them all the best in the cutthroat PC component industry as our choices for quality components seem to be getting fewer and fewer, and a resurgent ECS can only be good for consumers.
    Reply
  • ronch79
    ECS is the last thing that comes to mind when one wants reliable, durable, well designed PC components. Most folks regard them as a cheap, unreliable brand. They've been trying to improve their brand image lately, and they deserve some kudos for it. I wish them all the best in the cutthroat PC component industry as our choices for quality components seem to be getting fewer and fewer, and a resurgent ECS can only be good for consumers.
    Reply
  • lp231
    When you want to build a good reputation, then you do it from the start, not at the last minute. ECS board are crap, but if they want to turn around "now" instead of eons ago, then have the right to do so, but with their reputation tarnished from such a long time. It will take eons until they make it to the top tier list along with Asus, Gigabyte, and MSI.
    Reply
  • lp231
    When you want to build a good reputation, then you do it from the start, not at the last minute. ECS board are crap, but if they want to turn around "now" instead of eons ago, then have the right to do so, but with their reputation tarnished from such a long time. It will take eons until they make it to the top tier list along with Asus, Gigabyte, and MSI.
    Reply
  • InvalidError
    Most motherboards that I remember looking at use capacitors rated for 85-105C. Wonder who all those competitors using capacitors rated for only 65C are.

    Also, capacitors rated for 8000h at 105C will last a whole lot longer in a ventilated enclosure (PC/PSU case) where temperature is unlikely to exceed 50C, so the 200 000h rating on their 100C solid caps does not mean all that much.

    Another thing is that most capacitors I have replaced failed due to excessive AC ripple, not temperature or voltage. Quoting the capacitors' (or any device's) estimated operating lifespan is pointless if you step over their electrical specifications including any applicable derating.

    Time will tell whether ECS' claims are legitimate or fluff.
    Reply
  • juanc
    Could be "mechanically durable"... but will it be stable?
    Reply
  • dustmite
    I wrote off ECS years ago when I had a faulty GeForce 8800GTS 512. It was still under warranty, but because the 8800 was no longer made, they would only offer a replacement card of equal value. That's fine if "equal value" meant the price I paid, not what the card is worth 2 years later. They did, however, offer to replace it with a GTX460, but it was going to cost me $100, plus shipping. Thanks ECS, I'll be shopping elsewhere (read: EVGA).
    Reply
  • spentshells
    ecs boards are durable and they always have been, but being durable and being good are completely different things
    Reply
  • spentshells
    ecs boards are durable and they always have been, but being durable and being good are completely different things
    Reply