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The Alienware 18 Gaming Laptop Makes A Return

Back by popular demand, Dell has unveiled the next edition of Alienware 18 gaming laptop. The new version packs an incredible set of specifications, with staggering price tags to go along with them.

Dell has a selection of four pre-configured options that can be adjusted to suit your needs. Starting at $2,500, the Alienware 18 comes equipped with a 3.5 GHz Intel Core i7-4710MQ processor, 16 GB of 1600 MHz dual-channel DDR3L and a 1 TB 7200RPM hard drive. This configuration comes equipped with dual Nvidia GeForce GTX 970M GPUs with 12 GB of GDDR5.

There are also pre-configured systems for $2,900 and $3,650, which come with higher-end components. Each version can be upgraded with a number of options. You have the choice to upgrade the processor to either a 4.1 GHz Core i7-4910MQ or a 4.4 GHz i7-4940QX. Memory is expandable to 32 GB, and a 512 GB SSD can be added. Systems equipped with the GTX 970m GPUs can be upgraded to 980m chips with 16 GB of GDDR5.

The most expensive model is priced at $4,650 and features the extreme edition Core i7-4940QX, 32 GB of DDR3L, a 512 GB SSD with a 1 TB hard drive, and two GTX 980m GPUs. This represents the pinnacle of Alienware 18 models and offers no additional options.

Each of the Alienware 18 models features the same 18.4-inch WLED FullHD TrueLife display and 8-cell lithium ion battery rated for 86 wHr. Wireless communication is handled by an 802.11ac dual band Wi-Fi card and Bluetooth 4.0 controller. Dell has even included a slot load DVD burner in each. Audio is handled by speakers certified by Klipsch and the Alienware 18 also features the company's AlienFX lighting system, which lets you configure 10 different lighting zones with up to 20 different colors.

The Alienware 18 is not what you would consider a small computer. At two and a quarter inches thick, this is one of the beefier laptops available today. To house the 18-inch display, the chassis is 17.972 inches wide and 12.909 inches deep. With all the hardware installed, the Alienware 18 tips the scales at 12.064 pounds.

Interestingly, despite Windows 10 having been out for three weeks already, the Alienware 18 will ship with Window 8.1 preinstalled. Windows 10 is not an option from the factory, so those who want the new OS will need to do the free upgrade from Microsoft.

Alienware 18 laptops are available for purchase today on Dell's website. Lead times are expected to be 17 to 21 days.

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  • Rhostam
    I've owned a few "gaming" class laptops, but never anything as crazy as an Alienware or Razer. I have also owned a few desktops hand-built and pre-built. My priority has been portability when it comes to gaming since picking up your rig to go to a LAN session isn't exactly a popular thing (ever/ anymore?). For my recent desktop I tried out Alienwares X51 and I loved it. Small, petite and still capable enough to play the games I wanted at that time. So, when it came time to upgrade a few years later I plopped a 750Ti in it and squeaked out a little more. Awesome. But I still wanted something mobile, even as my gaming days begin to wane. I finally bought last "seasons" Alienware 18 and have one word to say: AWESOME. After a while I did have a problem with the screen. I may have done something to it, perhaps not. Either way, support took care of my problem which undoubtedly biases my opinion. SLI 880Ms still do the work I need. It's great news for people that they are continuing this line of portable gaming machines for people that don't want to use the external GPU device (which itself is awesome!) or use a smaller screen. 18" and you forget sometimes you are on a laptop!
    Reply
  • rigs79
    Why buy this when Skylake is so close? Just wait a few more months. Seems like an odd time to roll this out.
    Reply
  • Quixit
    Why buy this when Skylake is so close? Just wait a few more months. Seems like an odd time to roll this out.

    Skylake doesn't make a huge difference.
    Reply
  • 10tacle
    16489509 said:
    Skylake doesn't make a huge difference.

    Not in performance, no. But it uses less power, so yes, the mobile version upgrade to Skylake will be pretty significant for a laptop for a host of reasons.

    Reply
  • TechyInAZ
    Very nice and pretty! But *gag*, the price tag (no pun intended)!!
    Reply
  • 10tacle
    First of all, why would anyone spend upwards of $4,700(US) on a maxed out 1080p laptop. Dual SLI 970s is way overkill for that, let alone dual 980s. Sure, you can hook it up to a 1440p or 4K monitor, but then what's the point? You may as well just build a much less expensive desktop if you are going to peripheral dock it. I mean last year MSI rolled out their GT60 gaming laptops that had a 3K resolution option (1620p). WTH Dell?
    Reply
  • loki1944
    First of all, why would anyone spend upwards of $4,700(US) on a maxed out 1080p laptop. Dual SLI 970s is way overkill for that, let alone dual 980s. Sure, you can hook it up to a 1440p or 4K monitor, but then what's the point? You may as well just build a much less expensive desktop if you are going to peripheral dock it. I mean last year MSI rolled out their GT60 gaming laptops that had a 3K resolution option (1620p). WTH Dell?

    I would, spending a large amount of time overseas, I want the horsepower to run demanding games at high FPS and have them look good coming out of a projector.
    Reply
  • TechyInAZ
    16490003 said:
    First of all, why would anyone spend upwards of $4,700(US) on a maxed out 1080p laptop. Dual SLI 970s is way overkill for that, let alone dual 980s. Sure, you can hook it up to a 1440p or 4K monitor, but then what's the point? You may as well just build a much less expensive desktop if you are going to peripheral dock it. I mean last year MSI rolled out their GT60 gaming laptops that had a 3K resolution option (1620p). WTH Dell?

    I would, spending a large amount of time overseas, I want the horsepower to run demanding games at high FPS and have them look good coming out of a projector.

    Well for 1080P it's more overkill, a GT72 dominator is just as good at 1080P arguably as twin GTX 980Ms.
    Reply
  • loki1944
    16490091 said:
    16490003 said:
    First of all, why would anyone spend upwards of $4,700(US) on a maxed out 1080p laptop. Dual SLI 970s is way overkill for that, let alone dual 980s. Sure, you can hook it up to a 1440p or 4K monitor, but then what's the point? You may as well just build a much less expensive desktop if you are going to peripheral dock it. I mean last year MSI rolled out their GT60 gaming laptops that had a 3K resolution option (1620p). WTH Dell?

    I would, spending a large amount of time overseas, I want the horsepower to run demanding games at high FPS and have them look good coming out of a projector.

    Well for 1080P it's more overkill, a GT72 dominator is just as good at 1080P arguably as twin GTX 980Ms.

    A single 880M isn't the greatest for 1080p; SLI 980Ms is definitely the way to go. I know, I have an Origin 15S with an i7 and 880M. It's ok for 30-40 FPS in demanding games at 1080p on high settings http://www.notebookcheck.net/NVIDIA-GeForce-GTX-880M.107622.0.html , but SLI 980Ms would make maxing games at 1080p feasible. http://www.notebookcheck.net/NVIDIA-GeForce-GTX-980M-SLI.129389.0.html.
    Reply
  • CelicaGT
    16489509 said:
    Skylake doesn't make a huge difference.

    Not in performance, no. But it uses less power, so yes, the mobile version upgrade to Skylake will be pretty significant for a laptop for a host of reasons.

    This is an Alienware, not a laptop....it cares not for these things.
    Reply