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Possible 12-Core Third-Gen Ryzen 'Matisse' CPU Pops up in UserBenchmark Database

There's been plenty of speculation that AMD's new 7nm third-gen Ryzen processors could come equipped with more than the eight cores the company showed off at its recent CES keynote, and prolific database-detective TUM_APISAK's discovery of a 12-core 24-thread AMD engineering sample in the UserBenchmark database will certainly further the theory.

This isn't entirely unexpected, of course, as AMD's Lisa Su has commented that the third-gen Ryzen 'Matisse' design obviously leaves room for another chiplet, and that "you might expect that we will have more than eight cores."

The engineering sample's product code purportedly identifies this engineering sample as a Matisse processor with the "H2" designation at the end of the product string. The chip was also tested on an AMD Myrtle-MS development board, which is known to be an AM4 test platform. That means this processor is designed to fit within AMD's existing mainstream desktop lineup.

The test result lists the 12-core 24-thread engineering sample with a 3.4 GHz base clock and a 3.6 GHz average boost during the test. The 2D3212BGMCWH2_37/34_N product identifier lists the peak boost clock as 3.7 GHz, and the TDP rating as 105W. We're expecting higher turbo speeds from the third-gen Ryzen processors, the current gen tops out at 4.3 GHz, but early silicon typically comes with dialed back frequencies as vendors fine-tune the design. In other words, these results likely aren't representative of the final clock speeds.

The UserBenchmark System Memory Latency Ladder quantifies the latency of L1, L2, and L3 caches of the test sample, and the decline aftter 32MB indicates the engineering sample comes armed with 32MB of L3 cache. The test system is also configured with DDR4 Hynix memory running at 1,333 MHz, which equates to 2,666 MHz. 

The chips' single-core floating point score is also telling - at 130 points it outstrips a current-gen Ryzen 7 2700X (at roughly the same clocks) by ~13%, an improvement likely born of improved instruction per clock (IPC) throughput. That implies this chip comes with the Zen 2 microarchitecture.

We already know that third-gen Ryzen's 7nm compute die weighs in at eight cores apiece, so the 12-core engineering sample may just be the first sign of more cores to come in the future for AMD's new lineup. A second compute die theoretically leaves room for AMD to bump core counts up to 16 cores for its mainstream desktop platform, which, like the first-gen Ryzen chips, would redefine the playing field.


MORE: AMD Ryzen 3000 Series CPUs: Rumors, Release Date, All We Know About Ryzen 3

  • TJ Hooker
    The product identifier lists the peak boost clock as 4.7 GHz, and the TDP rating as 105W.
    Maybe I'm blind, but I can't see either of those listed anywhere on the userbenchmark results page?
    Reply
  • flyrobot27
    so zen2 at 3.6 ghz outscore a zen+ at 4.3 ghz on single core performance

    I WILL TAKE YOUR ENTIRE STOCK
    Reply
  • InvalidError
    The rumors are inching ever closer to being confirmed.
    Reply
  • PaulAlcorn
    21707499 said:
    The product identifier lists the peak boost clock as 4.7 GHz, and the TDP rating as 105W.
    Maybe I'm blind, but I can't see either of those listed anywhere on the userbenchmark results page?

    The clocks are listed in the 2D3212BGMCWH2_37/34_N product identifier. I clarified that in the article, thanks for the heads up.
    Reply
  • PapaCrazy
    Rumored core counts are beginning to make sense. The yields on the 8 core chiplets must be too good to even mess with quad cores. So 1 'bad' chiplet=a 6 core 3300. 1 'good' chiplet=8 core 3600. 1 good+1bad (or even 2 bad)=12 core 3700. 2 good chiplets=16 core 3800. Incredibly efficient method of packaging chips if true.
    Reply
  • rantoc
    AMD really seems to have a gem upcoming, ipc thats on pair or better than intel and finally clock rates that's comparable along with more cores and clever core packaging = Better use of the silicon and that also use to turn down to better consumer prices...

    While on the subject of prices... intel's latest stunt with non-igpu chips (likely failed gpu's just cut out) for the same price is just greed, faulty chips for the same price - Just bloody no. Each day intel works hard to make me avoid them more and more!
    Reply
  • aldaia
    "The UserBenchmark System Memory Latency Ladder quantifies the latency of L1, L2, and L3 caches of the test sample, and the decline at 32MB indicates the engineering sample comes armed with 32MB of L3 cache."

    Unless I'm missing something, if latency declines at 32MB, i would say L3 is smaller than 32MB. If L3 was exactly 32MB there would be no decline.
    Reply
  • s1mon7
    I'm not sure if you guys caught it, but a 13% IPC boost over Zen+ would top Intel's Coffee Lake IPC by a healthy margin. That would be just incredible for a gen-over-gen boost. The core count increase is the icing on the cake.
    Reply
  • justin.m.beauvais
    As a staunch defender of the leak due to just how reasonable it seems... I'm feeling pretty pleased. The Ryzen 3000 series is going to be a heck of a product stack, even if I'm wrong and this is the top core configuration... but as I've said many times, "If AMD can, why wouldn't they?". So I very much expect to see a 16 core sku with a 3000 series designation. Will it happen at launch? I dunno, but I expect that it will happen.

    Also, this is really our first hard look at IPC gains... and 13% is great, but in context looks freaking outstanding. AMD was within 5% of the Skylake based chips with Zen+. This puts them over Intel in IPC. More amusingly, this is done with a modest DDR4 2666 memory kit... so... either RAM speed doesn't matter as much anymore (which is wonderful), OR we could extract even more performance with a DDR4 3200 kit (which is more wonderfuller)... and if it behaves like Zen and Zen+ that could be a significant performance boost.

    So, this means that people like me, with Haswell to Kabylake i5's and i7's will FINALLY have something WORTH upgrading to at a reasonable price. I mean, if a Ryzen 5 3600 is going to be in the same performance range as an i9 9900K (remember AMD's demo, the 8c/16t chip would be a 5 if the 12c/24t is a 7) and cost less than my old 4590 did when it was new... heck yeah! I'm upgrading, and I suspect a lot of other people will be as well.

    Clear the lines, the hype train is coming through.
    Reply
  • redgarl
    AdoredTV was bang on.
    Reply