Asus GTX 1070 Strix Features DirectCU III Cooler, Too

It's launch day for Nvidia’s GeForce GTX 1070, and Founder’s Edition cards are already on the market (and selling out) from many of the top OEMs. Along with the initial reference offerings, companies such as MSI, Colorful and EVGA are announcing versions of the GPU with aftermarket cooling and higher clock speeds. Now, Asus joins the fray with two Strix-edition GTX 1070 graphics cards.

The Asus Strix GTX 1070 cards are almost identical to the company’s Strix GTX 1080 cards in appearance, with three Aura-LED fans, an angular design, and DirectCU Cooling III. Side by side, you wouldn’t be able tell the difference between the 1080 and the 1070 Stix-edition GPUs.

Product

Strix-GTX1070-08G-Gaming

Strix-GTX1070-8G-Gaming

Base Clock

- 1,632 MHz (Gaming Mode)

- 1,657 MHz (OC Mode)

1,506 MHz

Boost Clock

- 1,835 MHz (Gaming Mode)

- 1,860 MHz (OC Mode)

1,683 MHz

CUDA Cores

1920

1920

Memory Clock

8 Gbps

8 Gbps

Memory Interface

256-bit

256-bit

Outputs

- HDMI 2.0 x2

- DisplayPort 1.4 x2

- DVI-D

- HDMI 2.0 x2

- DisplayPort 1.4 x2

- DVI-D

Dimensions (L x W x H)

11.73 x 5.28 x 1.57 inches

11.73 x 5.28 x 1.57 inches

Price

$449.99

$429.99

The Asus Strix GeForce GTX 1070 has two models; one matches the Founder’s Edition clock speeds, and the other card is overclocked with two different modes of operation (it also costs more). Both Stix GTX 1070 cards offer plenty of output options, with two HDMI 2.0 ports, two DisplayPort 1.4 interfaces and a DVI-D port. 

As part of Asus’s Beyond VR Ready program, the GTX 1070 Strix cards tout performance exceeding the requirements for exceptional VR performance, and the dual HDMI outputs are a welcome feature for enthusiasts that had to reserve the one HDMI port on their previous-generation GPUs for a VR HMD.

You can order the Asus Strix GeForce GTX 1070 sometime next week, and the base model rings up for $429.99. The OC edition will cost $449.99.

Derek Forrest is an Associate Contributing Writer for Tom’s Hardware and Tom’s IT Pro. Follow Derek Forrest on Twitter. Follow us on Facebook, Google+, RSS, Twitter and YouTube.

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  • JackNaylorPE
    Wow ... that's a pretty nice premium over the FE ... and $100 more than the 9xx series .... curious as to why they'd start with such a shocking sticker price ....I don't see that lasting wrong unless they are finally trying to make peeps think the jump to the 1080 isn't so bad.
  • jasonelmore
    Nvidia should have never did the founders edition. That just gave everyone else a reason to charge $100 more for their $20 coolers
  • Aspiring techie
    Maybe they're more expensive because they're harder to produce. My guess is that they're not making more profit per card than the 9xx series simply because the process node is new and Pascal's die is very large, causing poor yields and thus a higher manufacturing cost.

    Right now is AMD's time to pounce. Their dies are smaller, so they can afford lower prices relative to Nvidia's. If the RX 480 is truly as powerful as the GTX 970, then buying two and going Crossfire is the way to go. They GTX 1070 is slightly more powerful than a Titan X, but two GTX 970s are even more powerful yet. Thus, for about $400, two RX 480s in Crossfire should equal or surpass the $450 1070 Founders (or $400 third-party cards). If AMD can produce and price cards like this the whole way up and down their line, they could be poised to capture over 50% of the market, which they desperately need in order to have a decent future.