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AVADirect's Avalanche Gaming PC Features Water Cooling With Hard Tubing

The new Avalanche system from AVADirect is indeed a high-powered machine chock full of high-end components, but its key differentiating feature is that it features (bent) hard tubing in its liquid cooling solution.

The system features Windows 8.1 Pro with an Intel Core i7-4790K, two Nvidia Geforce GTX 980s in SLI, 16 GB DDR3, and a 1 TB Samsung 850 EVO SSD paired with a 3 TB Barracuda HDD for storage. The system also utilizes a 1200 W 80 Plus Platinum power supply.

The Avalanche ships with a factory overclock. How much the GPU is overclocked is unclear, but AVADirect's site claimed a 20 percent or higher performance increase on the CPU.

This dream machine doesn't come cheap, with a whopping $5,900 price tag for the "Ultimate" version.

Paying $5,900 is a lot when you could build a similarly-spec'd system yourself for much less cash, but much of what you're paying for is the premier water cooling system and the overclocking services by AVADirect.

Not only did AVADirect liquid-cool the CPU and both GPUs inside of this system, but the company used high-end hard tubing. Hard tubing also takes longer to setup and is more difficult to build with than soft tubing.

If the price for the Ultimate edition is too much for you, a base model of the Avalanche with customizable parts and services is also available. The base model keeps the same case and the hard tubing, but all other components, save for the motherboard and cooling system, are different.

The base model features Windows 7 Home with an Intel i5-4690K, Nvidia Geforce GTX 970, 8 GB DDR3, and a 120 GB Samsung 850 EVO SSD paired with a 1 TB HDD for storage. The system utilizes a less powerful 860 W 80 Plus Platinum power supply. This base configuration costs $4,150.

The base model is not overclocked, but AVADirect offers GPU overclocking free of charge. There is an option for free "mild" CPU overclocking (between 10 and 20 percent), while an "extreme" CPU overclock (above 20 percent) will run you an additional $60.

You can upgrade the base model to an Intel Core i7-4790K CPU, and there are five GPU upgrade options available including Nvidia Geforce GTX 980, Nvidia Geforce GTX Titan X, and three SLI offerings.

The RAM options range up to 32 GB configurations but maintain the same speed across all setups, with a frequency of 1866 MHz and CL9 timings. The storage options are numerous, with multiple SSDs, HDDs and RAID configurations to choose from. The OS can also be upgraded to Windows 8.1 for free, but Windows 7 Professional, Windows 7 Ultimate, and Windows 8.1 Pro options will cost an additional fee. (That's all essentially irrelevant, though, when the Windows 10 upgrade rolls out this summer.)

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  • Larry Litmanen
    That's a nice piping work.
    Reply
  • thekyle64
    It looks very nice but it does cost a lot compared to building a similar system
    Reply
  • biggestinsect
    So like the hard tubing. Plan on using it when I, ever, go to full water with the GPUs.
    Reply
  • arossetti
    I bet their slogan is "A sucker is born every minute!" Almost 6k for the "ultimate"? You can build that system full water cooling and all (with hard pipes) for half that. A quick google search to find the OC tolerances, and a few hours testing for stability is not worth a 3k premium.

    Seriously, my time is valuable but I rather spend it doing a little research, building the system, and bending the pipes than working OT to pay for someone else to do it for me!
    Reply
  • Larry Litmanen
    I bet their slogan is "A sucker is born every minute!" Almost 6k for the "ultimate"? You can build that system full water cooling and all (with hard pipes) for half that. A quick google search to find the OC tolerances, and a few hours testing for stability is not worth a 3k premium.

    Seriously, my time is valuable but I rather spend it doing a little research, building the system, and bending the pipes than working OT to pay for someone else to do it for me!

    Of course you can do it yourself. Just like you can tint your own windows and put a tripe on your hood. At the end of the day the work that you will do will not be nearly as good as something done by a professional who does 10 of these a day.

    Yes there's a premium, and for that price i'd like to see a X99 system. But pictures look amazing, everything is done perfectly, great components. You can buy this system, update the GPU (which is pretty good in this system) in 3 years and you have an amazing looking PC that is silent, has good specks, everything is overclocked and all that will last you a good 5-6 years.
    Reply
  • leeb2013
    "much of what you're paying for is the premier water cooling system and the overclocking services by AVADirect"

    "AVADirect offers GPU overclocking free of charge"

    so the premium is really just for the hard tubing then!
    Reply
  • uglyduckling81
    The biggest problem with water cooling is the GPU heatsinks. They usually seem to run about $120/card which is just a massive expense. It's what has stopped me going this route on my last 2 PC's. Plus Air cooling does just as good a job for the CPU which make you wonder why you would bother other than some noise reduction.
    Reply
  • dstarr3
    Hard tubing certainly improves the look of a water-cooled build, but damn, is it a pain when you want to change or maintain some components. But I suppose the people that can afford this kind of machine don't upgrade computer components. They just buy whole new rigs every six months and throw the old ones in the trash.
    Reply
  • Schoeler
    That look really clean and very bad-ass at the same time!
    Reply
  • Rhinofart
    Doing the hard tubing is fairly tedious work. I've built 4 machines with hard tubes so far, and it's a very difficult thing to get 100% perfect every time. Even with all the right tools. It does take quite a bit of practice, and skill to get it all good
    Reply