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Cooler Master's MasterLiquid Pro Coolers Dual-Chamber CPU Blocks May Not Matter (Update: Pricing)

It is difficult for manufacturers to innovate in the world of all-in-one water coolers, but that hasn’t stopped Cooler Master from making an attempt. Its new units, the MasterLiquid Pro 120XL and MasterLiquid Pro 240, have redesigned radiators and pump assemblies.

The radiators have a square fin design, which means that the aluminum fins are neatly folded with 90-degree angles for maximum surface area and therefore higher heat dissipation.

The real highlight of the MasterLiquid Pro liquid coolers is the pump assembly. Rather than enclosing the pump and cooling fins in a single chamber, the cold plate has its own chamber, with the pump enclosed in another right above it. The coolant flows through the radiator, into the pump, and then through the cold plate and back to the radiator.

The idea behind this separate-chamber design is that the coolant around the pump is cool, leaving the pump running cooler and extending its lifetime. However, we aren’t so sure: In a liquid loop, fluid flows so fast that there is no discernible difference in temperature before and after passing through the cold plate. Additionally, despite the claims of a longer pump life, Cooler Master has not raised the MTBF (Mean Time Between Failure) rating of the pump or extended the warranty further compared to older units – they remain at 70,000 hours and 5 years, respectively. Nonetheless, Cooler Master claims that the pump has an MTBF of 175,000 hours, which is a very impressive figure.

Power consumption for the pump is set at 6 W at 12 V, and the spec sheet says that it makes less than 12 dBa of noise.

The MasterFan Pro 120 Air Balance fans provide up to 66.7 CFM of air flow and 2.34mm of static pressure when spinning at the full 2000rpm speed. At full speed they make 30 dBa of noise, and at the minimum 500rpm speed they whisper a mere 6 dBa. As expected, they have a 4-pin header and are therefore PWM-compatible.

The MasterLiquid Pro 120 and 240 will hit shelves this month, whereas the 140 and 280 mm variants should arrive in May. Cooler Master did not announce pricing.

Update, 4/19/16, 12:46pm PT: Pricing is $99.99 for the 120 and $119.99 for the 240.

Update, 4/25/2016 11:20am PT: Cooler Master reached out to us stating that the originally listed 70,000 hour pump life was a mistake. The actual MTBF sits at 175,000 hours.

Update, 5/05/2016 10:30am PT: Corrected original text to clarify pump life.

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  • dstarr3
    That headline isn't a sentence.
    Reply
  • TechyInAZ
    That headline isn't a sentence.
    Does it matter?

    Interesting CM AIOs for sure. I hope TH gets them in house to test to see whether they're claims are real or not.
    Reply
  • thestryker
    I feel like this design simply stems from Coolermaster not wanting to give Asetek money due to the dumb patent they have. I for one am happy, because I have no interest in giving Asetek any of my money and the only AIOs which currently don't cost quite a bit.
    Reply
  • biggestinsect
    Should be a headline with a sub header. Should matter, suppose to be journalism. Then again it is the Web.
    Reply
  • turkey3_scratch
    17841953 said:
    That headline isn't a sentence.
    Does it matter?

    Yes, it's actually a little misleading.
    Reply
  • Jamroast
    Just got a Zalman LQ320 for $35 which cools as good as most of the 240's
    , beat that CM.
    Reply
  • Gam3r01
    This is just CM trying to make "their own" cooler.
    All I see is more chances of leaking (though still slim).
    While they claim it supports longer life etc (which it seems like it wouldnt anyway) the just added two more holes to the waterblock.
    CLCs are just a waste.
    Reply
  • dstarr3
    That headline isn't a sentence.
    Does it matter?

    If they want to give even the slight impression that they are professional journalists, then yes.
    Reply
  • gggplaya
    The "LONGER LIFE" claim is probably because of the patent. They have to state a plausible reason for the design change, and the change has to be reasonable enough to be considered a different design to get around the asestek patent. If you just put a plate there, it wouldn't fly in a lawsuit.
    Reply
  • cheesemanx
    At this point with AIO coolers any improvement in pump/pump design is an great to hear. I have had terrible luck with AIO coolers all suffering pump failures. I know I have bad luck and the fact I have had pump failures on Antec, Swiftech, Silverstone, and CooIIT AIOs is just proof. I will say all manufacturers have stood behind there warranties and replaced the faulty units. I am game and will try one.
    Reply