Corsair's MP600 Pro NH SSDs: Big Performance, Laptop-Sized Package

Corsair
(Image credit: Corsair)

Modern high-performance SSDs tend to consume significant power, which means substantial heat dissipation and large heatsinks that make the drives incompatible with notebooks (and even some compact desktops). To address applications that require both compact dimensions and extreme performance, Corsair has quietly released its MP600 Pro NH family of SSDs. 

Corsair's MP600 Pro NH come in 500GB, 1TB, 2TB, 4TB, and 8TB configurations and promise sequential read speeds of up to 7,000 MB/s as well as sequential write speeds of up to 6,500 MB/s. The drives are rated for an up to 1 M/1.2 million random read/write IOPS, which is comparable to leading-edge PCIe Gen4 SSDs. The M.2-2280 drives rely on Phison's PS5018-E18 controller and 3D TLC NAND memory. 

Corsair's MP600 Pro NH (opens in new tab) belong to the company's top-of-the-range MP600-series drives with a PCIe 4.0 x4 interface that are renowned for their performance and which are among the best SSDs available today. The main difference between the MP600 Pro NH range and the remaining drives in the MP600-series fleet is the lack of a massive heat spreader on the new drives, which makes them compatible with laptops as well as compact desktops. Instead of an aluminum radiator, the MP600 Pro NH line presumably uses a graphene heat spreader. 

Corsair's MP600 Pro NH drives consume up to 10.8W of power and while graphene is known for good heat dissipation capabilities, good airflow inside your PC chassis is still recommended for consistent performance.  

(Image credit: Corsair)

When it comes to pricing, Corsair charges $72.99 for an entry-level 500GB MP600 Pro NH drive and $1074.99 for the top-of-the-line 2TB MP600 Pro NH SSD. The sweet spot 2TB model costs $212.99.  

In addition to its high-performance MP600 Pro NH (opens in new tab) family, Corsair also introduced its mainstream MP600 GS lineup that is rated for up to 4800 MB/s sequential read speeds, up to 3900 MB/s sequential write speeds, and up to 580K/800K random read/write IOPS. The drives will be available in 500GB and 1TB configurations and will also come with a graphene heat spreader. Keeping in mind that they consume up to 4.3W of power, they may be just what doctor ordered for laptops.

Anton Shilov
Freelance News Writer

Anton Shilov is a Freelance News Writer at Tom’s Hardware US. Over the past couple of decades, he has covered everything from CPUs and GPUs to supercomputers and from modern process technologies and latest fab tools to high-tech industry trends.

  • Amdlova
    Price of model 1 Tb is 1074 :)
    Reply
  • Math Geek
    "and $1074.99 for the top-of-the-line 2TB MP600 Pro NH SSD. The sweet spot 2TB model costs $212.99. "

    think you mean the 8 TB is $1074.99 :)
    Reply
  • helper800
    Math Geek said:
    "and $1074.99 for the top-of-the-line 2TB MP600 Pro NH SSD. The sweet spot 2TB model costs $212.99. "

    think you mean the 8 TB is $1074.99 :)
    I think ill trust you and your namesake on this one. 👌
    Reply
  • Alvar "Miles" Udell
    Think TH needs to start including a laptop in their NVMe SSD tests
    Reply
  • Amdlova
    Some ssd like this one with 10w not will work on these cheap oem. Some oem try to misleading saying support only 2 Tb models
    Reply
  • edzieba
    Step 1: Take any m.2 SSD
    Step 2: Remove the cosmetic heatsink (and pass those BoM savings onto yourself by raising RRP)
    Step 3: "OMG it's a brand new laptop drive variant!!1"

    NAND dies should not have heatsinks attached, they need elevated operating temperature for longevity and heatsinks just means they waste power (and burn block erase cycles generating heat) chasing a temperature setpoint they can no longer reach.
    SSD controllers do not thermal throttle except under constant read/write workloads, which when actually tested mean you need to be copying files of several hundred GB in size before you would ever see thermal throttling from an unsinked controller in real world usage.
    Reply