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Cryorig Announces LGA2066 Socket CPU Cooler Compatibility

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If you own a Cryorig CPU cooler that supports Intel’s LGA2011v3 socket and you’re planning to upgrade to a new X299-based motherboard, you’ll be happy to know that all of Cryorig’s existing LGA2011v3-supported CPU heatsinks will also support the X299 chipset’s new LGA2066 socket.

The company revealed that the mounting mechanism for both sockets are identical, which means no additional parts or adapters are required to support the upcoming X299 motherboards from Gigabyte, MSI, Asus, and other manufacturers. The supported models include: A series liquid coolers, the R1 Ultimate/Universal, R5, C1, H5 Ultimate/Universal, and the H7 Quad Lumi.

Many of you will remember that when AMD announced the AM4 socket, Cryorig offered a free upgrade for existing customers with AM3+ socket CPU coolers. Cryorig customers currently running an “AMD only” CPU cooler who want to switch to an X299-based system will need to purchase a new cooler, however, as the mounting systems are not compatible. At this point, no LGA2066 upgrade mounting kit has been announced for AMD owners.

We’ve reached out to Cryorig about the possibility of future upgrade kits for AMD CPU cooler owners but have not yet received a response.

  • derekullo
    Didn't the last article say something to the effect, "Don't use air cooling for i9"?

    http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/intel-core-i9-7900x-skylake-x,5092-10.html

    "Air cooling is out of the question for Core i9-7900X"


    I don't mean to misquote or bend the meaning of what was said, but it's unclear if this statement was meant for running at stock frequencies or for overclocking.

    What I'm trying to ask is, "Will my computer hit a thermal shutdown while using an i9 to render a video in handbrake with a Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO or a similar air-cooled cpu heatsink/fan?"

    Or is water cooled the only way to go for the i9 processor line?
    Reply
  • scannall
    That might cool the 4 core parts. But the 7900X would have a melt down.
    Reply
  • the nerd 389
    It's a shame. Really. Lots of people were counting on Intel making competent engineering decisions.

    Then the 7900x happened.
    Reply
  • JamesSneed
    19850643 said:
    Didn't the last article say something to the effect, "Don't use air cooling for i9"?

    http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/intel-core-i9-7900x-skylake-x,5092-10.html

    "Air cooling is out of the question for Core i9-7900X"


    I don't mean to misquote or bend the meaning of what was said, but it's unclear if this statement was meant for running at stock frequencies or for overclocking.

    What I'm trying to ask is, "Will my computer hit a thermal shutdown while using an i9 to render a video in handbrake with a Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO or a similar air-cooled cpu heatsink/fan?" Certainly not a

    Or is water cooled the only way to go for the i9 processor line?

    That was directed at the i9's so 10 cores and up. The thermals to displace are very high if you want to use air you most likely would want t o be running a delided chip and one of the bigger air coolers the Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO likely can't displace enough heat. Would be nice to see some testing on this matter for a few CPU coolers AIO and air.
    Reply
  • hannibal
    Your CPU just throthle a lot when using air, and you can forget overclocking. But air coolers works otherwice just fine.
    Reply
  • the nerd 389
    19853056 said:
    Your CPU just throthle a lot when using air, and you can forget overclocking. But air coolers works otherwice just fine.

    So I should simply accept the potentially damaging temperatures and inconsistent performance because my computer turns on?

    That's not really okay. If Intel expects consumers to put up with that, the reviews should reflect THAT performance.
    Reply
  • Danilushka
    "Then the 7900x happened."
    That is what happens when you get used to having no competition and a competitor takes you by surprise: hasty poorly-considered decisions.
    Reply
  • bit_user
    19853817 said:
    19853056 said:
    Your CPU just throthle a lot when using air, and you can forget overclocking. But air coolers works otherwice just fine.

    So I should simply accept the potentially damaging temperatures and inconsistent performance because my computer turns on?
    First, where did anyone say you should use air cooling for an i9? Just because a cooler fits a given socket shouldn't be taken as a statement that it's suitable for all CPUs that fit in it.

    Second, there's no reason the CPU needs to run at "potentially damaging temperatures", no matter what cooler you use. That's what throttling is for. You can configure where it throttles, at least on their unlocked processors.

    But it would be pretty dumb to use an inadequate cooler, because you'd waste money on an expensive CPU just to have it throttle a lot and run like a cheaper one (or worse).
    Reply
  • JamesSneed
    19853817 said:
    19853056 said:
    Your CPU just throthle a lot when using air, and you can forget overclocking. But air coolers works otherwice just fine.

    So I should simply accept the potentially damaging temperatures and inconsistent performance because my computer turns on?

    That's not really okay. If Intel expects consumers to put up with that, the reviews should reflect THAT performance.

    I do agree about the thermal issue and its really lame they have this and the TIM. On the flip side we are talking CPU's that are $1,000 and up range so its not like someone can't afford better cooling. I'm torn on getting a 7820x myself, would like to see how the thermals are with a delided CPU.
    Reply
  • the nerd 389
    19855983 said:
    19853817 said:
    19853056 said:
    Your CPU just throthle a lot when using air, and you can forget overclocking. But air coolers works otherwice just fine.

    So I should simply accept the potentially damaging temperatures and inconsistent performance because my computer turns on?
    First, where did anyone say you should use air cooling for an i9? Just because a cooler fits a given socket shouldn't be taken as a statement that it's suitable for all CPUs that fit in it.

    Second, there's no reason the CPU needs to run at "potentially damaging temperatures", no matter what cooler you use. That's what throttling is for. You can configure where it throttles, at least on their unlocked processors.

    But it would be pretty dumb to use an inadequate cooler, because you'd waste money on an expensive CPU just to have it throttle a lot and run like a cheaper one (or worse).

    It's true that there are watercoolers that will keep the chip from damaging itself or throttling. Remember, though, that these are also used in video editing rigs and entry level workstations. In those applications, the pump represents a previously unnecessary single point of failure. Basically, you have to decide whether you want a reliable cooler or a reliable CPU.

    That's not a decision that I'd expect Intel to force on consumers, but they did. Regarding the use of appropriate coolers, I suppose what I'm trying to say is that there are applications that this product line was well suited to where there is no longer such a thing as an appropriate cooler.

    I find that upsetting, particularly as I had a number of builds lined up that will now have to wait until ThreadRipper before they're viable.
    Reply