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Intel's ‘Intel Processor’ to Replace Pentium, Celeron Brands for Laptops in 2023

Intel
(Image credit: Intel)

Intel will decommission its legendary Celeron and Pentium brands used for basic notebook CPUs. Instead, starting in 2023, they will be referred to as the rather humble "Intel Processor" name. The move will allow the company to sharpen its focus on premium Core, Evo, and vPro brands and sell more premium CPUs. 

For now, Intel will continue to use Celeron and Pentium brands for desktop and embedded applications. When asked how this branding change would affect desktops, Intel told us, "Desktop has no new products in this segment slated for Q1 '23."

Intel's notebook product stack today includes a variety of Core-branded processors for high-performance, mid-range, and entry-level laptops, as well as Pentium and Celeron-badged CPUs for inexpensive essential systems. Starting from 2023 with notebooks, Intel will unite its Pentium and Celeron product families under the Intel Processor umbrella and will continue to address respective market segments. The new brand leaves unchanged Intel's existing processors (they will sell under their own names) and the company's product roadmap. 

"The new Intel Processor branding will simplify our offerings so users can focus on choosing the right processor for their needs," said Josh Newman, Intel vice president and interim general manager of Mobile Client Platforms.

While the merge may clear up some confusion between various Pentium and Celeron-branded laptop offerings, it might also create some new puzzlements. 

Intel's mobile Pentium Gold products are based on the company's designs featuring high-performance or high-performance and energy-efficient cores, therefore offering an experience comparable to that of fully-fledged Core processors. For example, the company currently offers Pentium Gold-badged Alder Lake CPUs with one high-performance Golden Cove and four energy-efficient Gracemont cores (8505). 

Intel's mobile Celeron processors are also based on the company's designs with performance (6305) or performance and efficient cores (7305). However, since they sit below mobile Pentiums, they have lower clocks, have smaller caches, or lack certain features. Yet, these are still quite capable chips for basic workloads. 

Merging mobile Pentium Gold and Celeron product families into one Intel Processor lineup makes sense on the condition that model numbers accurately represent their performance and capabilities. 

There are other Celeron and Pentium-branded processors for laptops too. Intel's mobile Celeron N and Pentium Silver processors are based on energy-efficient Atom-class cores and barely offer performance that is even slightly close to that of mobile Pentium Gold and 'vanilla' Celeron CPUs with high-performance cores. Intel did not update these product families this year as its Alder Lake-N design featuring only energy-efficient Gracemont cores is not yet here. But Intel is certainly prepping these system-on-chips for launch, and they might address market segments of Celeron N and Pentium Silver. 

We do not know whether or not Intel plans to add Alder Lake-N into the Intel Processor lineup for mobile PCs. But if it does, pouring in designs based solely on energy-efficient Atom-class cores into the lineup with quite different chips will create a lot of confusion.  

Anton Shilov
Freelance News Writer

Anton Shilov is a Freelance News Writer at Tom’s Hardware US. Over the past couple of decades, he has covered everything from CPUs and GPUs to supercomputers and from modern process technologies and latest fab tools to high-tech industry trends.

  • Colif
    My 1st PC had a Celeron 300mhz CPU in it.
    A part of history vanishes next year.
    Reply
  • ASCs
    When you are ashamed of your cheap line CPUs? :unsure:
    Reply
  • InvalidError
    ASCs said:
    When you are ashamed of your cheap line CPUs? :unsure:
    I believe it is the opposite issue: Celeron and Pentium still have too much legendary brand recognition, even the lobotomized models on the market today are still sufficient for most people buying them and Intel needs to disappear those legacy legendary brands to facilitate upselling people with lightweight compute needs into its modern higher-end brands they don't actually need.
    Reply
  • Giroro
    Intel might be thinking "A lot of people are using Chromebooks and starting to realize that those obsolete Celeron processors are terrible."
    "I know, let's rename our slightly-less-obsolete Celeron processors to something generic, so some people get confused into thinking they're buying a new product from higher in our lineup."

    But I think this will backfire. Now people will stop thinking "This Celeron processor is awful" and instead think "Intel processors are awful."
    Reply
  • The Historical Fidelity
    InvalidError said:
    I believe it is the opposite issue: Celeron and Pentium still have too much legendary brand recognition, even the lobotomized models on the market today are still sufficient for most people buying them and Intel needs to disappear those legacy legendary brands to facilitate upselling people with lightweight compute needs into its modern higher-end brands they don't actually need.
    Well Celeron has always been recognized as the barely adequate brand segment of Intel processors. I remember back in the day I had a net burst celeron and a net burst pentium 4 with the same clock frequency. The only difference was the celeron had disabled L3 cache and no SSE instruction support and the difference in performance was night and day. It was akin to switching from a 5400rpm hard disk drive to a gen 4 pci-e nvme ssd in 2022.
    Reply
  • steve4king
    The last time I went shopping for a laptop, I was frustrated by the imprecision of some labels that just said, "Intel Processor". I'd have to go to the mfg website and look up the laptop model to see what processor was included. Now that practice is being legitimized?

    Hopefully the part numbers clearly demonstrate a performance hierarchy.
    Reply
  • brandonjclark
    I don't like ANY of their names. They should keep it much more simple.
    Reply
  • SydB
    Colif said:
    My 1st PC had a Celeron 300mhz CPU in it.
    A part of history vanishes next year.

    Likewise, my first real PC had one too and I still have fond memories of it. A Celeron 300A, a seriously good piece of kit that clocked to 450Mhz with ease.
    Reply