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MSI’s Trident Makes VR-Ready Desktops Even Smaller

MSI debuted a new small form factor (SFF) VR-ready gaming PC called the Trident. The new system features 6th generation (Skylake) Intel processors in addition to custom MSI GeForce GTX 1060 graphics.

The Trident is shipping as fully-equipped PCs or barebones systems, which shed the CPU, memory, and storage but keeps the custom GPU. Full systems give you the choice of an Intel Core i7-6700 or a Core i5-6400, which sits on a custom MSI Intel H110 motherboard. It also features 3GB and 6GB variants of custom-designed mini-ITX MSI GTX 1060 GPUs.

Memory and storage options will vary, but barebones variants will leave it up to the user. Either way, the Trident supports up to 32GB of DDR4-2133 and whatever you can fit in a single 2.5-inch SATA drive bay and an M.2 slot (which supports only SATA-based SSDs).

The Trident may be small, but it offers plenty of USB connectivity. The rear panel features one USB 3.1 (Type-A) port and four USB 2.0 ports, and the front sports one USB 3.1 (Gen 1) Type-C interface and two USB 3.1 Type-A ports (one of which supports super charging). An Intel WGI219V Gigabit controller and an Intel Dual-Band Wireless-AC 3168 module provide internet connectivity.

The rear of the chassis also features an HDMI pass-thru (that you connect to the GPU) called VR-Link that gives users the option of connecting their HMD to the front of the device (there’s an HDMI output there, too), giving them some extra cable to play with.

The Trident features the company’s Silent Storm Cooling 2 technology, with input and output vents strategically placed to optimize airflow over the primary components. The interior features two separate chambers (one for the CPU and memory, the other for the GPU), and MSI claims the Trident can keep cool during near-silent operation. RGB Mystic Lighting also makes it to the Trident, giving users the ability to select the colors and effects for the case LEDs.

MSI expects the Trident to hit retailers sometime this month, with full systems starting at $899. The barebones models (GPU only) will hit Newegg starting at $599.

ProductMSI Trident
Processor Options- Intel Core i5-6400- Intel Core i7-6700
Memory CapacityUp to 32GB (2 x 16GB) DDR4-2133 SO-DIMM
Graphics Options- MSI GeForce GTX 1060 3GB GDDR5- MSI GeForce GTX 1060 6GB GDDR5
Storage Options- 2.5” HDD/SSD (SATA)- M.2 SSD (SATA)
Ports- USB 3.1 Type-C (Gen 1) - USB 3.1 Type-A x3- USB 2.0 x4- Mic, Line-In, Line-Out (Rear)- Mic (Front)- Headphone (Front)- RJ45 Ethernet
Video Output- HDMI 2.0 (Motherboard)- VR-Link (Rear Input, Front Output)- DisplayPort 1.3 (GPU)- HDMI 2.0 (GPU)- DVI-D (GPU)
Networking- Intel WGI219V Gigabit Ethernet- Intel Dual-Band Wireless-AC 3168 w/ Bluetooth
Dimensions13.63 x 9.15 x 2.82 inches
Starting MSRP- $899 (System)- $599 (Barebones)
  • Jeff Fx
    The lack of a GTX 1080 really cripples these supposedly made for VR PCs. Even a GTX 1080 can't offer the best possible picture in VR, but considering the price of a Titan, a lot of us had to settle for the 1080.
    Reply
  • iPanda
    hmm, isn't there some 1070 cut down variants that could fit? like they did with the 970?
    Reply
  • jaber2
    If the whole idea is to make it small and portable, hey wait, don't we already have some laptops that VRready?
    Reply
  • iPanda
    18872522 said:
    If the whole idea is to make it small and portable, hey wait, don't we already have some laptops that VRready?
    yup. good point. oh well, as long as it doesn't bankrupt msi, experiment away. lol
    Reply
  • anbello262
    Actually, this is quite a lot cheaper than most VR ready laptops. If you compare them to laptops, I believe you're missing the point of ITX and SFF desktops.
    I, for one, would buy one, since the price is not a lot higher than getting the components yourself and assembling such a small PC.
    The only problem that is stopping me is the reliability and qulaity of the PSU, since we don't even get any specs on that.
    Reply
  • Virtual_Singularity
    18873417 said:
    The only problem that is stopping me is the reliability and qulaity of the PSU, since we don't even get any specs on that.

    Quite right. Usually the psu is among the most cost effective parts of a brand name pre-build, often with just enough wattage to power original components. Just saying.
    Reply
  • Carbiniz3r
    add about 800 more dollars to the laptop price tag and your right.
    Reply
  • anbello262
    And I seriously doubt you can get ANY other PSU in there, so no replacement possible as well.
    Reply
  • wifiburger
    Trident hen ? I remember having a video card with that name
    Reply