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GE Announces Kepler Graphics Card for Military and Aviation

Yes, they may not be mainstream graphics cards, but they pack current GPU technology and offer it for special markets such as military applications and airplanes. GE said it just updated the Nvidia Fermi-based GRA111 and is now shipping the Kepler-based GRA112 with Nvidia's EXK107 graphics core.

“Program managers are under continuous pressure to reduce development costs and time-to-market while delivering maximum performance in the most demanding applications,” said Rod Rice, GM for military and aerospace products at GE, in a prepared statement. “The GRA112 provides a level of performance that, in many applications, is substantially superior to what is possible with traditional programming techniques – allowing developers to implement more sophisticated, more performance-hungry algorithms.”

The card carries 2 GB of GDDR5 memory and uses the standard 384 processing cores and 64 GBps internal memory bandwidth, as well as 16 GBps external PCI Express bandwidth. The floating point performance is promised at 622 double-precision GFlops. The big deal is, of course, the possibility to develop GPGPU applications based on CUDA for the card.

GE did not release pricing and availability data for the GRA112.

  • NightLight
    that's big business for the green team!
    Reply
  • rozz
    For this article, I can legitimately ask the question, "will it play crisis?"
    Reply
  • leo2kp
    I can honestly say that if I saw that thing in an airplane or something else, I would never have thought "yep, that's a graphics card."
    Reply
  • Chainzsaw
    Kind of odd to go with kepler when the 7XXX has much better GPGPU abilities.

    Anyone care to explain why they chose kepler?
    Reply
  • blazorthon
    ChainzsawKind of odd to go with kepler when the 7XXX has much better GPGPU abilities.Anyone care to explain why they chose kepler?
    GCN is only so much better when consumer graphics GPUs are used. Kepler's professional GPUs have far greater DP performance than their consumer GPUs. GCN might still be better, but with 384 cores supplying over 600GFLOPS of DP performance, the professional Kepler GPUs are at the least, very good competition. I think that this card has almost as much DP performance as the GTX 590.
    Reply
  • teaser
    I don't think these are the standard kepler based chips........
    Reply
  • freggo
    rozzFor this article, I can legitimately ask the question, "will it play crisis?"
    Yeah, because the next time you fly on the airlines you want to be assured that the pilots can play video games in the cockpit :-)
    Reply
  • blazorthon
    9368286 said:
    Yeah, because the next time you fly on the airlines you want to be assured that the pilots can play video games in the cockpit :-)

    It would probably do a crap job of playing Crysis. The GTX 550 TI would probably beat it. This card is built for DP compute, not gaming performance, and 384 Kepler cores is a very small number for Kepler cores when it comes to gaming.
    Reply
  • atikkur
    ChainzsawKind of odd to go with kepler when the 7XXX has much better GPGPU abilities.Anyone care to explain why they chose kepler?
    because of the communities my friend,, i believe nvidia is still the most famous amongst the scientist in concern of paralel-computing, their support and effort to promote this gpgpu thing are the toppest. and now, is the time for them to harvest their big work. imo.
    Reply
  • blazorthon
    9368296 said:
    because of the communities my friend,, i believe nvidia is still the most famous amongst the scientist in concern of paralel-computing, their support and effort to promote this gpgpu thing are the toppest. and now, is the time for them to harvest their big work. imo.

    Did you not read the article? It clearly states that this little card has over 600GFLOPS of DP compute performance. That makes it the fastest low end GPGPU board that I'v ever heard of. It's right up with the GTX 590 in DP compute performance.
    Reply