Nvidia Reportedly Cancels RTX 4090 Ti, Plans 512-bit Bus Next-Gen Flagship

GeForce RTX 4090 Founders Edition
(Image credit: Nvidia)

It seems that gamers still hoping to get into the RTX 40-series bandwagon will have to be content with the RTX 4090 GPU as the halo product of this generation. That's according to the typically thrustworthy leaker Kopite7kimi, who reported via Twitter that internal Nvidia plans to launch a refreshed flagship — let's call it the RTX 4090 Ti — have been canceled.

The rumor comes as the one-year anniversary of the RTX 4090's announcement (originally in September 2022) is fast approaching. Through recent years, Nvidia has been building out its product stack with mid-generation refreshes that not only add the "Ti" moniker, but also offer performance step-ups to better round-out the company's lineup against AMD's comparable competition. Nvidia has already launched some Ti models (namely the RTX 4060 Ti and the RTX 4070 Ti), but that strategy doesn't seem to be happening on the upper ladders of Nvidia's product stack anymore.

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There may be a few reasons for this. The main reason likely has to do with competition (or the lack thereof). Once again, AMD decided not to go after the performance crown; the RX 7900 XTX, while a great card that's frequently at the top of our list of the best graphics cards, is more of a direct competitor to the RTX 4080. Nvidia still has the halo product and the brownie points that brings, so why spend more money in bringing yet another SKU to market?

Of course, there's an argument that NVIDIA must be sitting on at least some number of fully-functioning AD-102 chips, but those bring less of a profit than a comparable professional accelerator (such as the Nvidia L40 or others). There's also the question of power consumption, and with the 16-pin meltdown controversy still not fully put to bed, the potential for issues with a 600W RTX 4090 Ti certainly exist.

There's also the fact that sales of graphics cards and PC components are slumping badly right now. With the previous generation RTX 30-series cards, Nvidia introduced the RTX 3080 Ti and RTX 3070 Ti less than a year after the initial launch, with an RTX 3090 Ti arriving in April 2022. The first two were commercially successful, due to the unprecedented demand. The last? Not so much. If Nvidia doesn't do a mid-cycle refresh for the RTX 40-series, that speaks volumes about how many cards are sitting on shelves.

Kopite7kimi added that while plans for Ti versions of Nvidia's top-performing cards are out of the deck, there's still a plan to optimize production silicon by introducing further products onto the stack. According to the leaker, though, these are being geared more toward the Chinese market and should fit in Nvidia's lineup as variations of the RTX 4060 and 4070 based on the AD103 and AD106 chips. If this pans out, it seems both AMD and Nvidia are willing to make specific GPUs to cater to the (admittedly immense) Chinese market.

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As an added bonus, Kopite7kimi also mentioned that multiple industry sources have confirmed that the next-generation Nvidia flagship (let's call it the RTX 5090) will feature a 512-bit memory interface. If true, this marks the first time since the GTX 280 and GTX 285 days — all the way back in 2008/2009! — that Nvidia has used a 512-bit bus width.

Of course, that doesn't include dual-GPU cards, like the Titan Z with a 2 x 384-bit bus.  Or there was also the GTX 295 with a dual 448-bit interface. The last mainstream consumer GPU with a 512-bit bus (not counting HBM/HBM2 solutions) were AMD's R9 390/390X (which were basically tuned variants of the earlier R9 290/290X). Regardless, most graphics cards on the market instead use a simpler, and less expensive, 256-bit bus. Top models may go as wide as a 384-bit interface, which is still enough to offer bandwidth of around 1 TB/s mark when paired with the appropriate VRAM tech (GDDR6X or GDDR6).

Companies usually prefer to add memory bandwidth by adopting newer (and faster) memory tech rather than by increasing the bus depth, due to the lower developmental and manufacturing costs incurred. And with Nvidia being expected to introduce its RTX 5000 series by 2025, it's theoretically possible that the company might be looking to pair its next product family with GDDR7 memory.

At a maximum throughput of 32 Gbps, a 512-bit bus width would translate into 2 TB/s throughput — double that of the RTX 4090. Considering how even $1,500 cards are nowadays insufficient to run the latest games at full settings and native resolution (looking at you, Remnant II), there may be something to that idea. With 2GB memory chips, a 512-bit interface would also translate to 32GB of VRAM total on such a GPU, or potentially even 64GB and 128GB professional versions with 4GB chips.

Again, everything we're saying here stems from Kopite7kimi's tweets. While they're generally correct, this isn't the same as an official confirmation. Product roadmaps can and will change. Maybe Nvidia will ultimately decide to launch a new Titan RTX based on AD102, maybe it won't. So do your best "salt bae" impersonation with regards to the RTX 4090 Ti and future RTX 5090 rumors.

Francisco Pires
Freelance News Writer

Francisco Pires is a freelance news writer for Tom's Hardware with a soft side for quantum computing.

  • InvalidError
    Nvidia going: "Oh crap, we nerfed memory bus widths silly in the 4000-series, we've got to go back up for our pricey GPU lineup to make sense, not be bandwidth-starved and have options for fitting memory!"

    To be at least a little fair, GDDR6 cost about $12/GB back when the RTX4000 series was being finalized. Now that cost is down to $3-4/GB, there is no excuse for being so stingy with next-gen memory load-out.
    Reply
  • Elusive Ruse
    So bandwidth matters after all?
    Reply
  • hotaru251
    InvalidError said:
    we've got to go back up for our pricey GPU lineup to make sense, not be bandwidth-starved and have options for fitting memory!"
    if you dont think nvidia'd not rise prices becasue of those changes...

    they'd price em higher and say "well the higher bus & more memory cost more"

    back to $2000 halo product prolly.
    Elusive Ruse said:
    So bandwidth matters after all?
    they know it does.

    for the 4060 ti they even stated it was a downgrade vs 3060 ti in most stuff but showed real gains in dlss 3 situations (which is true but again its only like 1% of stuff support it...)

    likely just want ppl to pay more for the higher tiers
    Reply
  • tamalero
    InvalidError said:
    Nvidia going: "Oh crap, we nerfed memory bus widths silly in the 4000-series, we've got to go back up for our pricey GPU lineup to make sense, not be bandwidth-starved and have options for fitting memory!"

    To be at least a little fair, GDDR6 cost about $12/GB back when the RTX4000 series was being finalized. Now that cost is down to $3-4/GB, there is no excuse for being so stingy with next-gen memory load-out.
    They probably have tons in inventory that they have to sell at a price point to do not make loses.
    Reply
  • Kamen Rider Blade
    Elusive Ruse said:
    So bandwidth matters after all?
    Bandwidth & Capacity have always matter.

    nVIDIA is just a giant CheapSkate about it.

    hotaru251 said:
    back to $2000 halo product prolly.
    Don't give them ideas!
    Reply
  • JarredWaltonGPU
    hotaru251 said:
    for the 4060 ti they even stated it was a downgrade vs 3060 ti in most stuff but showed real gains in dlss 3 situations (which is true but again its only like 1% of stuff support it...)
    No, Nvidia absolutely did not say it was a downgrade versus the 3060 Ti. At most it said, in briefings, that there might be edge cases where it could end up slightly slower. But overall, without DLSS 3, it's typically 10–15 percent faster than the 3060 Ti, at resolutions and settings that matter for either GPU. (Meaning, not 4K ultra.)

    What Nvidia did do was to heavily push the DLSS 3 Frame Generation narrative. Yes, uptake is relatively swift, especially compared to the original DLSS. But right now there are still only 39 released games that use DLSS 3. And yet Nvidia's marketing material for RTX 4060 Ti used 18 games for benchmarks, 11 of which were DLSS 3 enabled.
    Reply
  • InvalidError
    hotaru251 said:
    back to $2000 halo product prolly.
    When you pass the $1000 mark, you are usually dealing mostly with people who aren't going to care much if their GPU-for-the-0.1% costs $2000 or $3000.

    For the more cost-sensitive people, last I heard, Intel was aiming for roughly twice the performance per dollar with Battlemage. Even if Intel delivers only half of that, it'll still give AMD and Nvidia a serious run for their money at ~$350 for performance generally exceeding the 4070 (by the raw numbers, the A770 should be able to trade blows with the 4070Ti, lots of seemingly untapped potential left) backed by 16GB of VRAM on 256bits. Next year should be interesting unless Battlemage gets delayed into 2025 or poofs out of existence.
    Reply
  • digitalgriffin
    With 4090 sales dropping off a cliff I think NVIDIA is reading the tea leaves of what a failure an even higher priced version will be.
    Reply
  • JarredWaltonGPU
    InvalidError said:
    When you pass the $1000 mark, you are usually dealing mostly with people who aren't going to care much if their GPU-for-the-0.1% costs $2000 or $3000.

    For the more cost-sensitive people, last I heard, Intel was aiming for roughly twice the performance per dollar with Battlemage. Even if Intel delivers only half of that, it'll still give AMD and Nvidia a serious run for their money at ~$350 for performance generally exceeding the 4070 (by the raw numbers, the A770 should be able to trade blows with the 4070Ti, lots of seemingly untapped potential left) backed by 16GB of VRAM on 256bits. Next year should be interesting unless Battlemage gets delayed into 2025 or poofs out of existence.
    Do you mean a "performance doubled" B770? Because the A770 16GB is nowhere near the 4070 Ti in performance right now, and theoretical performance is ~20 teraflops versus ~40 teraflops. But yeah, if Intel can do Battlemage with 2x the A770 performance for $350, that would be a nice option. Right now, the 4070 Ti is about double the performance of the A770, at nearly double the price.
    Reply
  • RTX 4090, is proving to be one of the best purchases ever! And it gets even better by the day!
    Reply