AMD Ryzen 7000 Chips on Massive Sale, Starting at $249

AMD
(Image credit: AMD)

Now that both AMD and Intel have released their latest CPUs and the reviews are in, it is time to decide and buy. Perhaps to make the decision a bit easier, AMD is running a promotion with huge discounts on its latest Ryzen 7000-series processors.

AMD currently offers four Ryzen 7000-series CPUs based on its latest Zen 4 microarchitecture targeting performance-demanding enthusiasts, content creators, and gamers. These processors are priced between $299 and $699, but for a limited amount of time they are available at well below MSRP.

Swipe to scroll horizontally
AMD Ryzen 7000 Zen 4 Specifications
Row 0 - Cell 0 Current PriceMSRP Cores / Threads (P+E) Base / Boost Clock (GHz) Cache (L2+L3)TDP / MaxMemory
Ryzen 9 7950X $573$699 16 / 32 4.5 / 5.7 80MB 170W / 230W DDR5-5200
Ryzen 9 7900X $473$549 12 / 24 4.7 / 5.6 76MB 170W / 230W DDR5-5200
Ryzen 7 7700X $348$399 8 / 16 4.5 / 5.4 40MB 105W / ? DDR5-5200
Ryzen 5 7600X $248 $299 6 / 12 4.7 / 5.3 38MB 105W / ? DDR5-5200

AMD's range-topping 16-core Ryzen 9 7950X carries an MSRP of $699, but for a limited time it is available for $574 at Amazon (opens in new tab), which is a sizeable 28% discount. For those who do not want to invest in all 16 Zen 4 cores, AMD has its 12-core Ryzen 7900X with a $549 tag on it, which is available for $474 at Amazon (opens in new tab), a 14% discount. 

In addition, AMD has the six-core Ryzen 5 7600X, which is officially priced at $299, but it can be obtained for $249 from Amazon (opens in new tab). The sweetest spot is perhaps the eight-core Ryzen 7 7700X, which is set to retail for $399, but which sells for $349 at Amazon (opens in new tab), a significant 22% discount. 

All four AMD Ryzen 7000-series CPUs available are unlocked. They can be overclocked assuming that you have a capable AMD X670E/X670 or B650E/B650 motherboard. Of course, these new AM5 platforms require DDR5 memory, which is more expensive than DDR4 kits, but DDR5 prices are getting lower. Furthermore, since AMD's new CPUs are rated for a maximum thermal design power of 230W, some users must purchase a new cooler and perhaps even a new power supply. 

Yet, the new discounts — which are not official price cuts by AMD — will perhaps sweeten the pill.

Anton Shilov
Freelance News Writer

Anton Shilov is a Freelance News Writer at Tom’s Hardware US. Over the past couple of decades, he has covered everything from CPUs and GPUs to supercomputers and from modern process technologies and latest fab tools to high-tech industry trends.

  • tomachas
    This should have been prided right from the start. AM5 build up comes a huge price tag. At this point, if Intel offers 10-15% off , I think they will provide better value.
    Reply
  • daworstplaya
    The market has spoken, AMD priced their products too high. IMHO, the "sale" prices should've been their MSRPs to being with. Even with these "sale" prices, I forsee it being a hard sell.
    Reply
  • frogr
    ($699-$574) /$699 = 18% discount not 28%
    Reply
  • TechieTwo
    IMO the AMD 7000 CPUs are priced appropriately but the AM5 mobos priced above $300 are price gouging. DDR5 is going to cost a little more because of it's design. The price will drop on DDR5 as production ramps. The current discounts on the AMD 7000 CPUs should make people happy but I don't view them as a "massive sale".
    Reply
  • bolweval
    Feel bad for all the early adopters that already shelled out the opening prices...
    Reply
  • FunSurfer
    There are two AMD 7000 CPU options for gamers: the 7600X for budget gamers and the 7700X3D for enthusiast gamers.
    7700X price doesn't worth the small performance gains over the 7600X like all the former AMD CPU generations (like 3700X not much better than 3600) and the 7700X3D is not available yet and I assume that is what most gamers are waiting for and what causes weak sales for now.
    Reply
  • Giroro
    AM5 motherboard prices need to come down at least 30%. Until then, AMD's 7xxx processors are essentially fictional.
    I don't need to concern myself with processors that don't really exist.
    Reply
  • btmedic04
    wonder if i can get microcenter to price match and still do their deal with a free kit of ddr5 6000c30
    microcenter deal for those who live near one
    Reply
  • lmcnabney
    Everything is going against AMD on this generation. They poorly decided to bank EVERYTHING in DDR5 being cheap enough and built a high-cost chipset/platform. This would have been fine if Intel phoned-in RL, but they didn't. It sure says something how a very mature 10nm process can clock far higher than Taiwan's fancy new 4nm process.

    When you factor the motherboard cost, higher RAM cost, and bin the required CPU price to provide equivalent system performance to Intel would require the CPUs to have even greater price cuts.
    Reply
  • Barefoot
    daworstplaya said:
    The market has spoken, AMD priced their products too high. IMHO, the "sale" prices should've been their MSRPs to being with. Even with these "sale" prices, I forsee it being a hard sell.

    Apparently these prices are from Amazon and NOT AMD, so yeah, Intel can do a SmackDown and have a good go of it. They overclock better at this point. Also AMD is new to the LGA sockets, so their employees may be a bit confused by it. (Also their sockets have 18 more pins than Intel, so I'm wondering if the same cooling fans will work for it? That'd kinda standardize things a little 🤔
    Reply