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Samsung’s New QLED Gaming Monitor Is DisplayHDR Compliant

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Samsung announced that its 49” CHG90 QLED monitor, billed by the company as the “world’s largest” QLED gaming monitor, is the industry’s first display to be certified as DisplayHDR compliant.

In case you missed it, the Video Electronics Standards Association (VESA) announced last week that it has developed a new VESA High-Performance Monitor and Display Compliance Test Specification (DisplayHDR), the display industry's first fully open standard specifying high dynamic range (HDR) quality including luminance, color gamut, bit depth, and rise time.

Samsung’s QLED CHG90 super ultra-wide aspect ratio monitor measures 49" diagonally from corner to corner. The monitor features a 32:9 aspect ratio, 3840 x 1080 resolution, 1800R curvature, and 144Hz refresh rate. The CHG90’s 3,000:1 contrast ratio, sustained brightness of at least 350 cd/m², corner luminance no higher than 0.10 cd/m², and 600 cd/m² (candela per meter squared) peak brightness means that it falls directly into VESA’s DisplayHDR 600 middle tier certification.

Samsung said this about the certification:

When granting DisplayHDR™ 600 certification to the CHG90, VESA cited the monitor’s use of HDR to elevate contrast ratio (3,000:1), color accuracy and overall presentation vibrancy as an industry standard-setter. The certification further validates the CHG90’s ability to provide the optimal gaming and entertainment viewing environment, but is just the latest in a series of recent accolades for the monitor.

Samsung’s QLED CHG90 is available now from a variety of retailers with a MSRP of $1,300.

ProductSamsung CHG90 QLED Monitor
Display Size49”
Resolution3840 x 1080
Aspect Ratio32:9
Refresh Rate144Hz
Response Time1ms
Contrast Ratio3000:1
Brightness600 cd/m2
Dimensions47.36 x 20.69 x 15.02"
Weight33.1lbs
Price$1,300
  • c4s2k3
    Kind of cool, but many games don't adequately support 21:9 aspect ratio, let alone 32:9.
    Reply
  • dark_lord69
    WOW...
    Looks like THE gaming monitor to get.

    I said that because it uses Quantum dots. But after looking around a bit I digress. I've seen better monitors that also use Quantum dots.
    Reply
  • anbello262
    Definitely a strange aspect ratio, but I see it could be good for people who like multiple monitor setups. It's 'the best of both worlds' (wide aspevt ratio with no bezel). If only more games were prepared for this...
    Reply
  • MeeLee
    No proper 4k support?

    as far as 21:1, most games do support the resolution, as long as Windows supports it.
    The extra horizontal pixels work really well with F1 racing games, 3D shooters, and a plethora of games!
    Reply
  • Jake Hall
    1080. Bye
    Reply
  • anbello262
    20497146 said:
    No proper 4k support?

    as far as 21:1, most games do support the resolution, as long as Windows supports it.
    The extra horizontal pixels work really well with F1 racing games, 3D shooters, and a plethora of games!

    I don't truly understand your post. It might be cause I've been studying too much and I'm mentally tired, but what do you mean by "No proper 4k support?"? After all, this is just an ultra-ultra wide monitor, exactly like 2 1080p monitors side by side.


    And this is 32:9, so I also don't really understand the 21:9 part.
    Just to clarify, when I said "I wish more games supported this" I meant it like "properly" support it. Many games, when overstretched horizontally, will not look really well, with such high FOVs. After all, it would be like a 150° FOV, depending on the distance to the monitor




    On another note: Jake Hall, did you downvote my post because you truly disagree with my words, or just because of petty revenge for me downvoting yours?
    Reply
  • sunny420
    To me the :9 ratio ruins it once the monitor is over 24-27". What's with the vertical resolution reluctance?
    Reply
  • anbello262
    20497820 said:
    To me the :9 ratio ruins it once the monitor is over 24-27". What's with the vertical resolution reluctance?

    I think the point is exactly that, having an extremely wide monitor (close to 3:1, but even wider) to use instead of 2 fullHD monitors side by side You just avoid the bezel in the center.
    Reply
  • AcesB
    This monitor has the same area and dimensions of two 27" Full HD displays, side by side, bezel aside.
    Pixel density is about 81 DPI, which is LOW. You can see the pixels, and worst, you can see that tiny black frame around each pixel.
    A good resolution for 16x9, 27" is 2560x1440, with DPI around 110DPI. Applied to this new Samsung 49" size, that means gorgeous 5120 x 1440!
    Good for GTX 1080 class or better.
    Reply
  • Dantte
    20498842 said:
    This monitor has the same area and dimensions of two 27" Full HD displays, side by side, bezel aside.
    Pixel density is about 81 DPI, which is LOW. You can see the pixels, and worst, you can see that tiny black frame around each pixel.
    A good resolution for 16x9, 27" is 2560x1440, with DPI around 110DPI. Applied to this new Samsung 49" size, that means gorgeous 5120 x 1440!
    Good for GTX 1080 class or better.

    What you are "wanting" is not possible with todays technology. This monitor already takes 17.92Gbps (@8bit color) of bandwidth to transmit the video to the display. This nearly saturates todays HDMI 2.0 and DP1.2 standards. 32:9 1440P would take 31.85Gbps, which does not exist today other then the HDMI 2.1 standard which is only a piece of paper right now. The other option to get a 32:9 into a single moniotor would be to divide the video signal across (2) cables and video outputs on your computer, but then you would need to build a wall processor into the monitor substantially increasing the cost and lag.

    If you want 32:9 1440p you're going to have to deal with dual monitors for the time being.
    Reply