Lamptron gets caught using counterfeit AIDA64 software keys with its LCD-equipped products

Lamptron ST060
(Image credit: Lamptron)

Der8auer reports that Lamptron is selling illegal AIDA64 keys with its LCD-equipped products  — including LCD air coolers and dedicated LCD hardware monitoring displays. FinalWire Ltd., makers of AIDA64, confirmed to Der8auer that Lamptron is bundling free invalid AIDA64 keys with its products and has been doing so for some time. FinalWire has requested that Lamptron stop this shady practice, but it has not. Der8auer suspects that Lamptron is using some sort of key generator to generate fake AIDA64 keys that will validate, but only on select versions of the software. 

The German overclocker first discovered Lamptron's shady tactics through one of his employees who heard about Lamptron AIDA64 product keys not working on a forum two years ago. Deciding to see if this was true or not, Der8auer pulled out a "free" AIDA64 key from his Lampton ST060 air cooler to see if it would work.

He found that the key works as advertised. The box says the AIDA64 key is a "free version and does not support online upgrades." Plugging the key into AIDA64 activates the product without any issues. However, updating AIDA64 caused the key to become invalid (just as the box info says).

After contacting FinalWire, the AIDA64 makers confirmed that Lampton's "free" AIDA64 keys are invalid and illegal. It reports that Lampton registered as a reseller two years ago but only placed a single order for AIDA64 Extreme. FinalWire finally reveals that it is unclear if Lampton ever bundled valid licenses with its devices.

"We understand your concerns regarding the "FREE VERSION" license included with the cooler. Unfortunately, we've discovered instances of Lampton bundling invalid AIDA64 licenses with their products. When we became aware of this, we immediately contacted Lamptron and requested they cease this practice. Although they registered as a reseller two years ago and placed a single order for AIDA64 Extreme, it's unclear if they ever bundled valid licenses with their devices."

Der8auer tested several other Lampton AIDA64 keys from several other products and discovered that all of them were invalid. Some of them were labeled as different versions as well, including AIDA64 Extreme and AIDA64 Business, even though Lampton only officially bought AIDA64 Extreme at one time.

Lampton is using its free AIDA64 keys to power its LCD displays. The company's displays don't have any software included and thus requires 3rd party software to operate. AIDA64 has a feature that allows users to make their own OSD specifically for secondary hardware monitoring displays.

The German overclocker shared all five additional keys he tested to FinalWire. FinalWire reported back that all keys were invalid, which strongly suggests Lampton is using some sort of key generator.

"Unfortunately, none of the product keys you shared are valid in our system. This strongly suggests they were generated illegally using a tool like keyGen," stated FinalWire Ltd.

For now, no one has taken legal action against Lampton for selling illegal AIDA64 keys. But if it continues to provide these keys against FinalWire's wishes, the company is obviously at continuous risk of serious consequences.

Aaron Klotz
Freelance News Writer

Aaron Klotz is a freelance writer for Tom’s Hardware US, covering news topics related to computer hardware such as CPUs, and graphics cards.

  • peachpuff
    Chinese company?

    Reply
  • thestryker
    peachpuff said:
    Chinese company?

    Chinese company who bought a Western company's name! (I don't know the full history of the original company so I don't know if there was anything left of said company when the purchase happened)
    Reply
  • Sluggotg
    You guys are implying that a Marxist Company would steal Intellectual Property from some one??? How Shocking!

    They are scum thieves and I hope they get sued and or who ever is making the decision to Steal goes to jail. I just need to remember "Lamptron" so I know never to buy anything from them.
    Reply
  • Notton
    Couldn't they have used something like HWiNFO + InfoPanel?
    Or does that combo have too much extra work to setup compared to AIDA64?
    Reply
  • Alvar "Miles" Udell
    HWiNFO is a subscription for commercial use, which this would probably fall under.

    AIDA64 is effectively a subscription $20 per PC ($60 for 3) per year if you want updates.

    Not really anything I can think of that'd work and for free, or at least a single purchase price in this software-as-a-service world we live in.
    Reply
  • Garden-Gnome
    So, will this article get updated to reference the "shady practices"?
    https://www.tomshardware.com/pc-components/cooling/lamptrons-new-cpu-cooler-has-a-screen-as-big-as-the-iphone-15-st060-sports-a-six-inch-lcd-with-a-1920x1080-resolution-that-functions-as-a-second-display
    Reply
  • pclaughton
    Alvar Miles Udell said:
    HWiNFO is a subscription for commercial use, which this would probably fall under.

    AIDA64 is effectively a subscription $20 per PC ($60 for 3) per year if you want updates.

    Not really anything I can think of that'd work and for free, or at least a single purchase price in this software-as-a-service world we live in.
    I prefer Rainmeter personally, but there's obviously a lot of subjective personal opinion in that.
    Reply
  • TechLurker
    thestryker said:
    Chinese company who bought a Western company's name! (I don't know the full history of the original company so I don't know if there was anything left of said company when the purchase happened)
    Old Lamptron were in the early DIY/hardcore PC building and modding business, selling a variety of tools to de-pin and re-pin cables, and supporting extreme cooling via custom fan controllers that they built and tested, with the goal of being able to (voltage) control even the most power-hungry fans at the time. They also used to sell some of the early liquid cooling stuff cases and 5.25 bay peripherals.

    IIRC, their last major product before closing and being bought was the CF525 fan controller around 2014, which still relied on voltage control but could power 5 server-grade fans, with a maximum wattage of 60w per fan. There were plans to release an upgraded version that could support controlling high-power counter-rotating server fans (the 76mm thick monsters). Slowing sales in the air cooling community and the shift towards cases with little to no 5.25 bays (and in some cases, fewer fan mounts too, in the pursuit of aesthetics and silence) partly led to their demise.

    When they "returned" a few years ago, the first thing they were now selling were rebranded Aliexpress junk, and everything released since there were all rebranded Aliexpress stuff.
    Reply