Ryzen 9000 Zen 5 CPU trails Core i9-14900K in leaked benchmark — Granite Ridge 5.8 GHz CPU shows Core i9-13900K-like single-threaded performance in CPU-Z

Ryzen 9000 Granite Ridge CPU
Ryzen 9000 Granite Ridge CPU (Image credit: Baidu Tieba/yoihua77)

As we're a few days away from Computex 2024, the first screenshots and single-threaded benchmark score (via HXL) of an alleged Ryzen 9000 (Granite Ridge) processor have surfaced. Many expect AMD to announce the new Zen 5 chips at the Taiwan event, which will compete with the best CPUs currently on the market.

The Zen 5 chip is somewhat mysterious, as the user who posted the screenshot on the Baidu Tieba community intentionally pixelated many of the processor's specifications. Nonetheless, CPU-Z does confirm that the chip is from the Granite Ridge family and resides on the existing AM5 socket. The engineering sample has a TDP of 170W, suggesting it's likely a mid-to-high-end SKU. The Zen 5 processor shows as model number 100-000001290, a previously surfaced number.

Assuming that the last two digits of the OPN are "11" (they're blurred out), the Zen 5 processor should be the same 100-000001290-11_N engineering sample that appeared in the wild last year. If so, the chip should be an 8-core configuration with 16 threads. That means we're likely looking at a Ryzen 7 9700X, the direct replacement for the existing Ryzen 7 7700X. On the flip side, what stands out from the CPU-Z screenshot is the 170W TDP. Assuming AMD could maintain the 170W TDP target on the top chips, this could be a Ryzen 9 9950X or a Ryzen 9 9900X.

The leaker claims that the Zen 5 processor had a boost clock speed of 5.8 GHz, the highest we've seen from a mainstream Ryzen chip. For comparison, the Ryzen 9 7950X, the current flagship, has the top boost clock speed of 5.7 GHz, so we're looking at a 100 MHz improvement on the unidentified Zen 5. The leaker also stated that the "non-X3D chip easily takes out Zen 4's X3D" but didn't provide cache-sensitive or gaming benchmarks to corroborate those claims.

AMD Ryzen 9000 Zen 5 Granite Ridge Benchmarks

Swipe to scroll horizontally
ProcessorCPU-Z Single-Threaded Score
Core i9-14900K942
Ryzen 9000 @ 5.8 GHz910
Core i9-13900K902
Ryzen 9 7950X767
Ryzen 9 5950X647

Scores for the other processors are from CPU-Z's benchmark database.

As always, we recommend caution before reading too much into any leaked benchmarks. The leaker used an engineering sample, so it doesn't have the exact specifications of the retail sample. Also, note that CPU-Z's benchmark isn't the best metric for comparing processor performance. It's not the end-all, be-all benchmark on which to base any final judgments.

The Zen 5 chip reportedly delivers 18.6% higher single-threaded performance over the Ryzen 9 7950X. The improvement looks believable since the transition from Zen 3 to Zen 4 showed a similar margin (18.5%) in single-threaded performance.

What may be alarming for some is that although Zen 5 shows a significant improvement over Zen 4, it doesn't seem to surpass the competition — at least in single-threaded performance. The Zen 5 engineering sample was right up there with the previous Core i9-13900K, but it lags behind the newer Core i9-14900K, which produced a 3.5% higher single-threaded score.

It's worth remembering that AMD's single-threaded performance has traditionally trailed behind Intel's offerings, particularly when speaking of the Alder Lake 12th Gen and Raptor Lake 13th/14th Gen parts that have a hybrid architecture. Closing the gap on single-threaded performance, even if it's still a few percent slower, would be a big deal. We're anticipating 12-core and 16-core Ryzen 9000-series CPUs, which could certainly give Intel's current champion some difficult competition. Then again, we're also expecting Intel Arrow Lake CPUs to arrive later this year, which is where the real challenge will be.

AMD's CEO, Dr. Lisa Su, will deliver Computex 2024's opening keynote, during which she will share details on AMD's "next generation of high-performance PC, data center, and AI solutions." Although the chipmaker never explicitly mentions Zen 5, we'll likely (hopefully) see an official announcement. Retail availability, however, may not come until July or later.

Zhiye Liu
RAM Reviewer and News Editor

Zhiye Liu is a Freelance News Writer at Tom’s Hardware US. Although he loves everything that’s hardware, he has a soft spot for CPUs, GPUs, and RAM.

  • Metal Messiah.
    Article:: ""The leaker claims that the Zen 5 processor had a boost clock speed of 5.8 GHz, the highest we've seen from a mainstream Ryzen chip. For comparison, the Ryzen 9 7950X, the current flagship, has the top boost clock speed of 5.7 GHz, so we're looking at a 100 MHz improvement on the unidentified Zen 5""

    That's because for Zen 5, AMD has changed the Infinity Fabric interconnect for the CCD-CCD and IOD communication, and the IMC (Memory Controller) has been given an upgrade as well.

    Hence the CPU runs at a frequency 100 MHz faster than the Ryzen 9 7950X.

    Also, since this is a 170W TDP engineering sample, this is 100% either a 16-core or a 12-core SKU. 8-core chip seems out of equation.

    That's because ZEN 5 CPU lineup is supposed to feature the same core count as the current Ryzen 7000 series, with 16, 12, 8 and 6 cores. There won't be any smaller or dense ZEN 5c cores at least initially.

    Only Zen 5 cores.

    AMD Ryzen Granite Ridge CPUs should be available in four configurations include the top 16 core part, & followed by 12, 8, and 6 core variants.

    https://www.chiphell.com/forum.php?mod=viewthread&tid=2608542&extra=page=1&mobile=no
    https://i.imgur.com/fo2mKEf.png
    Reply
  • helper800
    Metal Messiah. said:
    That's because for Zen 5, AMD has changed the Infinity Fabric interconnect for the CCD-CCD and IOD communication, and the IMC (Memory Controller) has been given an upgrade as well.

    Hence the CPU runs at a frequency 100 MHz faster than the Ryzen 9 7950X.

    Also, since this is a 170W TDP engineering sample, this is 100% either a 16-core or a 12-core SKU. 8-core chip seems out of equation.

    That's because ZEN 5 CPU lineup is supposed to feature the same core count as the current Ryzen 7000 series, with 16, 12, 8 and 6 cores. There won't be any smaller or dense ZEN 5c cores at least initially.

    Only Zen 5 cores.

    AMD Ryzen Granite Ridge CPUs should be available in four configurations include the top 16 core part, & followed by 12, 8, and 6 core variants.

    https://www.chiphell.com/forum.php?mod=viewthread&tid=2608542&extra=page=1&mobile=no
    https://i.imgur.com/fo2mKEf.png
    How can we say this was not the 9700X 8 core part? They only tested single-threaded performance. Was one of the earlier tests associated with the part number the 12-core or 16 core part? The 170w TDP does not mean it was impossible for this test to have been on an 8c part, no? Either way I am happy with a 18.5% increase in ST.
    Reply
  • evdjj3j
    Chips and Cheese has an article about why this benchmark is terrible.

    https://chipsandcheese.com/2023/11/03/cpu-zs-inadequate-benchmark/
    Reply
  • Metal Messiah.
    The leaker also stated that the "non-X3D chip easily takes out Zen 4's X3D" but didn't provide cache-sensitive or gaming benchmarks to corroborate those claims.

    That's because the standard Zen 5 CPUs are going to outperform Zen 4 3D V-Cache chips in gaming, due to improvements to Zen 5 architecture, and other upgrades like Infinity Fabric interconnect and IMC .


    Ryzen 9000 Zen 5 CPU trails Core i9-14900K in leaked benchmark
    The Zen 5 engineering sample was right up there with the previous Core i9-13900K, but it lags behind the newer Core i9-14900K, which produced a 3.5% higher single-threaded score.

    First of all you need to realize this is an early sample, and it is likely that with the final silicon, the chip's performance should be much better with firmware support. And I also expect the IPC to end up close to 15%.

    i9-14900K boosts one of its P-cores to 6.00 GHz, to yield the 908 points that's part CPU-Z's reference scores.

    So "Zen 5" has a higher IPC than the "Raptor Cove" P-core powering the i9-14900K. Its gaming performance might end up higher than the Ryzen 7000 X3D family.

    Also, we should never trust CPU-Z scores, at least for AMD Ryzen CPU benchmarks, Zen architecture.

    CPU-Z app never took advantage of Zen4's improvements to the arch like, micro-op cache, branch prediction, L2 cache capacity etc, but other apps did. I expect the same with ZEN 5.

    With AMD Excavator lineup to Zen 1: There was roughly 52% IPC IncreaseZen 1 -Zen+: 3% IPC IncreaseZen --Zen 2: 15% IPC IncreaseZen --Zen 3: 19% IPC IncreaseZen 3 -- Zen 4: 13% IPC IncreaseZen 4 -- Zen 5: ~10-15% IPC increment ? (speculation)
    Reply
  • helper800
    evdjj3j said:
    Chips and Cheese has an article about why this benchmark is terrible.

    https://chipsandcheese.com/2023/11/03/cpu-zs-inadequate-benchmark/
    Yeah, most know CPU-Z's tool is not the best for benchmarking, but its all we got to go on.
    Reply
  • helper800
    Metal Messiah. said:
    Also, never trust CPU-Z benchmark, at least for AMD Ryzen CPU benchamrks.
    AMD Excavator to Zen 1: 52% IPC IncreaseZen 1 To Zen+: 3% IPC IncreaseZen + To Zen 2: 15% IPC IncreaseZen 2 To Zen 3: 19% IPC IncreaseZen 3 To Zen 4: 13% IPC IncreaseZen 4 To Zen 5: ~10-15% IPC Increase
    If AMD Excavator was a baseline of 100 that means:

    Zen1 is 152
    Zen+ is 156.56
    Zen2 is 180.04
    Zen3 is 214.25
    Zen4 is 242.11
    Zen5 is purported to be (10%-15%) 266.32-278.42
    Reply
  • shawman123
    Lots of copium in this thread :) Another benchmark and we will talk about Zen 50% as well.
    Reply
  • gggplaya
    Very much looking forward to JUNE 3rd 2024 for Lisa Su's keynote at computex. Only a few days away on Monday 9:30am Teipei time, which means it's on Sunday 9:30pm eastern time U.S. https://www.amd.com/en/corporate/events/computex.html
    Then we can see who was right or wrong on their speculation.
    Reply
  • helper800
    shawman123 said:
    Lots of copium in this thread :) Another benchmark and we will talk about Zen 50% as well.
    Who say anything related to 50% of anything? AMD excavator to Zen1 IPC increase? If so that is not copium, that's a fact...
    Reply
  • -Fran-
    Even if someone doesn't want to believe the CPU-Z benchmark, when you compare AMD to AMD instead of Intel to AMD, the jump looks really good to me. Extrapolate this to the MT score and it seems like they'll increase overall metrics by a substantial margin (or I'd hope they do).

    Grain of salt and all, but to me this is not a negative in the bigger picture.

    Regards.
    Reply