2800W Super Flower PSU boasts four 12V-2x6 power connectors — good for quad GPU setups used for AI training, not gaming

SuperFlower 2800W PSU
(Image credit: Future)

Super Flower unveiled a new PSU at Computex 2024 that blows other consumer power supplies out of the water. Sporting a whopping 2800W rating, Super Flower's new Leadex SF-2800F14HP 3.1 has enough power and enough 12V-2x6 connectors to handle four RTX 4090 graphics cards all by itself. 1200W and 1600W power supplies have long been some of the highest rated units (in terms of power supplied) that you can buy for the consumer market. If you really need more than that, you've usually had to opt for a server PSU, but Super Flower feels there's room for this in the consumer market. Will it make our list of the best power supplies? Only if you're building something more than a typical PC.

The SF-2800F14HP has five voltage rails in total, including +3.3V, +5V, -12V, and +5VSB rails. The first two rails are good for a combined output of 120W, while the latter two are capable of supporting 6W and 15W respectively. The +12V holds the vast majority of the power, with a maximum output of 2799.6W all by itself.

The power supply supports a whopping 19 rear power connectors in total. Seven 8-pin connectors are dedicated to 8-pin EPS and PCIe power, and five 6-pins and a single 8-pin are dedicated to SATA and PERIF devices. For GPUs sporting the new 12VHPWR or 12V-2x6 connector (the latter is backward compatible with the former), Super Flower's new 2800W unit supports four 12V-2x6 connectors, enabling you to connect up to four 16-pin compatible graphics cards. (Or two if you happen to use one of the relatively few graphics cards that require two 16-pin connectors.)

Despite its high power rating, SuperFlower's new unit is only designed to support a single PC, featuring just one 24-pin connector. That could be a turn-off for some of Super Flower's customers who want a single high-wattage unit to drive multiple systems. But this new unit was never intended to fulfill that role obviously. Rather, this new unit is aimed at high-performance enthusiast and workstation systems that feature a plethora of PCIe devices, including multiple high-performance GPUs.

The power supply will be particularly useful for machine learning builds, which are normally comprised of two, three, or even four AI GPUs like the RTX 4090. Basically, AI likes high-end cards with as much VRAM as possible, preferably with AI processing like what you can get from Nvidia's tensor cores.

Beyond ports and power capacity, the Leadex SF-2800F14HP 3.1 is unsurprisingly 80 Plus Platinum certified, which is one of the highest certifications a PSU can have beyond the flagship Titanium spec. That means the PSU will have very good power efficiency, especially when running at 40% to 80% of its maximum power rating. The unit also supports the ATX 3.1 specification, which means it includes at least one 12V2x6 power connector (not the older 12VHPWR connector).

Something else to note is that most typical 120V circuits in U.S. houses are only rated for 15A. The maximum amount of power you can draw from a 15A circuit is only 1,800W, and that's not including PSU efficiency. Meaning, an 1600W PSU running at 92% efficiency could actually draw 1740W from the outlet. And this 2800W PSU at 92% efficiency could pull 3,043W. You'll definitely need a 25 Amp circuit to run this, and even then you wouldn't want it at 100% load — and you wouldn't want anything else on the circuit either. Think of it as something like a typical electrical dryer than needs its own 30A 240V circuit.

Super Flower advertises the use of full Japanese capacitors throughout the unit. Japanese capacitors are regarded as the highest-quality caps in the world and are a prime go-to for making high-performing yet reliable power supplies. We didn't get information on pricing or availability, but we expect Super Flower's new 2800W to be very pricey, well beyond what a normal extreme PSU goes for — and with the Leadex 1600W going for $289, we'd expect the 2800W model to easily more than double that price.

Aaron Klotz
Freelance News Writer

Aaron Klotz is a freelance writer for Tom’s Hardware US, covering news topics related to computer hardware such as CPUs, and graphics cards.

  • SyCoREAPER
    4x 12VHPWR, 4 times the fire risk lol
    Reply
  • stonecarver
    Admin said:
    though it would be for compute and AI purposes rather than for gaming.
    I completely get not for gaming but think back to 2016 and we were getting ramped up that the powers that be were implementing laws that new computers had to sip less energy from the grid. :sol:

    Throw in a few years and AI and that push went up in smoke. :ouimaitre:

    https://phys.org/news/2016-12-california-nation-energy-efficiency.html
    Reply
  • CmdrShepard
    It's time for video card vendors to start selling their products bundled with case and PSU and a fat long extension cable for PCI Express bus.
    Reply
  • deesider
    stonecarver said:
    I completely get not for gaming but think back to 2016 and we were getting ramped up that the powers that be were implementing laws that new computers had to sip less energy from the grid. :sol:

    Throw in a few years and AI and that push went up in smoke. :ouimaitre:

    https://phys.org/news/2016-12-california-nation-energy-efficiency.html
    Those regulations simply mandated efficiency requirements for when the PC is at idle.

    They were commonly misunderstood at the time, and all these years later people still don't seem to be able to read past the headline.
    Reply
  • Amdlova
    Bundles with fire extinguisher.
    Reply
  • PEnns
    2800W
    That will be the recommended PSU wattage for the RTX 7090....;)
    Reply
  • Sandman-rawr-
    The biggest problem in the Americas with this is unless you plan to game in your kitchen or bathroom you won't have an outlet that gets close to this. You can check your breaker panel, most of the outlets in your house are going to be 15 Amp outlets. 15 Amps x 120V = 1800 Watts. Usually but not always the outlets in your kitchen or bathroom will be 20Amp outlets, 20Amps x 120V = 2400 Watts. It's not likely you have larger outlets in your household (there are larger connections but the shape of the outlet is different from a standard 3 prong outlet). It doesn't mean they can't be correctly wired and created by a qualified electrician, but it's not likely to be cheap. This applies to the Americas, mostly the US and Canada, Europe and the rest of the world may be different. You do not want to change the breaker without having adequately gauged cable in your walls, this should only be done by a certified professional, if the cable is too thin you can set your house on fire. 2800W / 120V = 23.3334 Amps
    Reply
  • deesider
    Sandman-rawr- said:
    The biggest problem in the Americas with this is unless you plan to game in your kitchen or bathroom you won't have an outlet that gets close to this. You can check your breaker panel, most of the outlets in your house are going to be 15 Amp outlets. 15 Amps x 120V = 1800 Watts. Usually but not always the outlets in your kitchen or bathroom will be 20Amp outlets, 20Amps x 120V = 2400 Watts. It's not likely you have larger outlets in your household (there are larger connections but the shape of the outlet is different from a standard 3 prong outlet). It doesn't mean they can't be correctly wired and created by a qualified electrician, but it's not likely to be cheap. This applies to the Americas, mostly the US and Canada, Europe may be different. You do not want to change the breaker without having adequately gauged cable in your walls, this should only be done by a certified professional, if the cable is too thin you can set your house on fire.
    So two comments after I complained about people not reading articles past the headline, this guy didn't even read the headline!
    Reply
  • Sandman-rawr-
    deesider said:
    So two comments after I complained about people not reading articles past the headline, this guy didn't even read the headline!
    I read through, and they explain a little bit, but they don't bother to mention you can melt the wires in your walls with it.
    Reply
  • Sandman-rawr-
    Sandman-rawr- said:
    I read through, and they explain a little bit, but they don't bother to mention you can melt the wires in your walls with it.
    if the breaker fails to close the wires in your wall will look like toaster wires
    Reply