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Asus ROG Swift PG32UQX Mini LED Gaming Monitor Review: The Ultimate Computer Monitor?

Amazing color and features at a very premium price

Asus ROG Swift PG32UQX
Editor's Choice
(Image: © Asus)

Viewing Angles

Asus ROG Swift PG32UQX

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

Viewing angles are one area where the PG32UQX is no different than any other IPS panel. Brightness drops by 20%, and the color shifts slightly to reddish green. Detail remains sharp with all steps in the test pattern clearly visible. The top view is blue in tone with 40% light reduction and some loss of detail.

Screen Uniformity

To learn how we measure screen uniformity, click here.

Asus ROG Swift PG32UQX

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

The screen uniformity test is unit-specific and can vary between different samples of the same monitor. But for $3,000, we expect greatness, and the PG32UQX delivers with a 7.31% result. There was no glow or bleed visible with the room lights turned off. If you display a black pattern with a tiny white object, like letters or a pause bug from a media player, you’ll see halos around it. But the halo effect was only visible in the situation described. The halo effect is an artifact created by all zone-dimming backlights, not a fault specific to the PG32UQX. The good news is that such artifacts are smaller and less obvious when you have more zones like the Asus does. Our sample performed exactly as a premium LCD monitor should.

Pixel Response & Input Lag

Click here to read up on our pixel response and input lag testing procedures.

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Asus ROG Swift PG32UQX

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
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Asus ROG Swift PG32UQX

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

Now that 240 and 360 Hz monitors are on the market, 144 Hz might be considered a starting point for gaming performance. The PG32UQX is plenty fast though and represents the highest speed available for a 4K screen. Its 7ms draw time is typical of the class, and its total lag of 29 ms is also about right. The top Asus and LG screens have a slight advantage, thanks to their edge backlights. Clearly, FALD units have a little processing overhead. The PG32UQX is the fastest of the FALD screens in this group.

Christian Eberle
Christian Eberle is a Contributing Editor for Tom's Hardware US. He's a veteran reviewer of A/V equipment, specializing in monitors.