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Eve Spectrum ES07D03 Review: Premium Image Quality and Performance

The best overdrive we’ve ever tested

Eve Spectrum ES07D03
Editor's Choice
(Image: © Eve)

Our HDR benchmarking uses Portrait Displays’ Calman software. To learn about our HDR testing, see our breakdown of how we test PC monitors.

The ES07D03 supports HDR10 signals with a DisplayHDR 600 certification. When the appropriate content is detected, it switches modes automatically.

HDR Brightness and Contrast

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Eve Spectrum ES07D03

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
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Eve Spectrum ES07D03

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
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Eve Spectrum ES07D03

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

In HDR mode, the ES07D03 employs a 16-zone dimming feature with its edge LED backlight. This isn’t as effective as a full-array configuration, but it delivers far better HDR than a monitor that does nothing to enhance HDR contrast. It is also better than modulating the entire backlight as some screens do. My sample peaked at just over 701 nits when measuring both window and full-field patterns. This provides a lot of pop and dimension to the image, especially when coupled with the very low 0.0387-nit black level. The resulting contrast is 18,127.1:1, one of the better HDR contrast scores I’ve recorded. In practice, the HDR image is excellent with lots of depth and highly saturated color.

Grayscale, EOTF and Color

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Eve Spectrum ES07D03

(Image credit: Portrait Displays Calman)
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Eve Spectrum ES07D03

(Image credit: Portrait Displays Calman)

The ES07D03’s factory calibration obviously extends to HDR even though it’s not documented on the included data sheet. Grayscale tracking is visually perfect. The luminance curve runs a little dark in shadow areas and transitions to tone-mapping about 4% too early. These are minor issues that will be hard to spot in content. I certainly had no complaints when playing Doom Eternal or watching streamed HDR10 video content.

HDR color tracking shows a bit of over-saturation in red, magenta and blue. Green is also slightly over in the inner targets. Gamut coverage is thorough, which means you’ll see every intended color and detail in HDR games and video.

Christian Eberle
Christian Eberle is a Contributing Editor for Tom's Hardware US. He's a veteran reviewer of A/V equipment, specializing in monitors.
  • Gillerer
    The review has no mention - never mind cautioning potential buyers - of the less-than-stellar reputation Eve has when it comes to delivering products....

    Taking preorders for the "first high-end high resolution monitor with high refresh rate", then taking months to fulfil the orders, by which time other manufacturers have released and actually started selling similar models; Buyers would have been better off waiting and getting the name brand option.

    EDIT: And no, I'm not talking about kickstarter backers, but actual retail orders after the product was supposedly released.
    Reply
  • 10tacle
    I am so tired of 27" 4K monitors. Can we PLEASE get 32" 4K straight up 16:9 for those of us with older eyes who like gaming but think that 1440p at that size is just not enough pixel density for the size? The large older flight simulator community will thank whoever creates one with business.
    Reply
  • TimeGoddess
    This reads more like an ad than a review
    Reply