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EVGA GeForce GTX 1650 GDDR6 Review: Boosted Performance in a Crowded Market

The EVGA GeForce GTX 1650 GDDR6 is priced too high relative to the 1650 Super.

EVGA GeForce GTX 1650 GDDR6
(Image: © Tom's Hardware)

EVGA's Precision X1 software works with most Nvidia GPUs, just like MSI Afterburner. Whether it's monitoring or tuning your GPU, EVGA's software will get the job done and is one of the best tools for that purpose on Nvidia hardware. With the built-in OC scanner tool, it will even try to find a stable and relatively safe overclock. 

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EVGA GTX 1650 GDDR6

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
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EVGA GTX 1650 GDDR6

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EVGA GTX 1650 GDDR6

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
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EVGA GTX 1650 GDDR6

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
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EVGA GTX 1650 GDDR6

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EVGA GTX 1650 GDDR6

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
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EVGA GTX 1650 GDDR6

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EVGA GTX 1650 GDDR6

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
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EVGA GTX 1650 GDDR6

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

EVGA GTX 1650 GDDR6 Overclocking 

Most of the time, we don't find it necessary to push GPUs beyond the factory settings, but if you want to get a modest 5-10% bump in performance, you usually can. We started with a run of the OC scanner, which took about 30 minutes … and then Precision X1 crashed when we tried to save the resulting profile. Nice.

Rather than spending another 30 minutes, we decided the manual overclocking route was faster and easier. After tweaking the fan speed curve a bit to help with cooling, we then did some quick testing while looping Unigine Heaven 4.0 in a window and determined a reasonably 'safe' manual overclock consisted of +1000 MHz on the GDDR6 and +150 MHz on the GPU. That results in 14 Gbps GDDR6 memory clocks, which most cards and chips seem perfectly able to handle.

We ran through the 1080p medium tests on all of the games to confirm the overclock was (reasonably) stable, and see how much it helped performance. Here's the resulting performance summary:

Tom's Hardware GPU Overclocking Performance Average / 99th Percentile FPS
GameSettingEVGA 1650 GDDR6 OCedEVGA GTX 1650 GDDR6 StockEVGA 1650 GDDR6 OCed vs. Stock
9 Game Average (Geomean)1080p Medium83.3 / 61.078.0 / 58.06.7% / 5.1%
Borderlands 31080p Medium67.7 / 56.063.5 / 54.86.6% / 2.1%
The Division 21080p Medium83.5 / 68.078.6 / 65.86.3% / 3.4%
Far Cry 51080p Medium80.4 / 67.075.2 / 63.16.8% / 6.2%
Final Fantasy XIV1080p Medium103.5 / 51.096.3 / 46.87.5% / 8.9%
Forza Horizon 41080p Medium117.8 / 96.7110.7 / 91.76.4% / 5.5%
Metro Exodus1080p Medium58.2 / 28.354.5 / 27.46.7% / 3.1%
Red Dead Redemption 21080p Medium69.8 / 58.765.0 / 55.37.3% / 6.1%
Shadow of the Tomb Raider1080p Medium71.2 / 54.667.9 / 52.34.8% / 4.5%
Strange Brigade1080p Medium120.2 / 102.7111.1 / 96.38.1% / 6.6%

While it's not our full test suite, the quick and dirty overclock of the EVGA GTX 1650 GDDR6 improved performance by 7% on average, with a few games showing up to an 8% increase in performance. Minimum fps doesn't improve quite as much, and the limited 4GB VRAM certainly plays a role in that.

Overclocking did increase power and temperatures a bit, but not as much as you might expect. Throughout the overclocked testing, we logged data using Powenetics, our graphics card power consumption tool, and found it averaged 87W of power use under load. The average GPU temperature was still only 61.5C, and average fan speed was 1814 RPM.

Nvidia GPUs dynamically adjust clock speed based on power and thermals, but we increased the power limit (to the maximum +6%), and the +150 MHz overclock appeared to directly correlate with clock speed: The card averaged 2070 MHz, where stock performance was 1916 MHz. That's a nice little overclock for a budget GPU.

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Jarred Walton

Jarred Walton is a senior editor at Tom's Hardware focusing on everything GPU. He has been working as a tech journalist since 2004, writing for AnandTech, Maximum PC, and PC Gamer. From the first S3 Virge '3D decelerators' to today's GPUs, Jarred keeps up with all the latest graphics trends and is the one to ask about game performance.