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Gigabyte Gaming GT Desktop Review

Gaming Benchmarks

Alien: Isolation

Clearly, Alien: Isolation isn't a hardware-taxing game, and the Gigabyte Gaming GT can play it above 60FPS at the highest settings, even at 3840 x 2160. Not surprisingly, it performs better than our test bed (equipped with a GTX 1070) with its factory-overclocked GPU. Even if the CPU were a factor in this game's performance, the increased GPU clock rate pushes it 3-5 FPS higher than our reference-clocked test rig at all tested resolutions.

Ashes of the Singularity

We test Ashes of the Singularity at its most demanding settings, so it's no surprise that the performance deltas between GTX 1070 and GTX 1080-equipped systems are minimalistic at higher resolutions, where the CPU becomes the limiting factor. Even at 1080p, the factory-overclocked Gigabyte GeForce GTX 1070 G1 Gaming graphics card in the Gaming GT desktop is less that 10 FPS away from the best-performing GTX 1080 system. This isn't an impressive achievement on this game with these settings, but the fact that the Gigabyte Gaming GT is competitive with these other, more expensive systems is.

Bioshock Infinite

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By now, the pecking order of these systems should be fairly clear. However, the Gigabyte Gaming GT comes withing striking distance of the Acer Predator G1's average framerate in Bioshock Infinite at 1920 x 1080 by a margin of only 3.02 FPS. In a game like this, CPU horsepower (clockrate, to be exact) can limit framerates at lower resolutions (where the GPU doesn't work so hard), so its no surprise that the Gigabyte Gaming GT's Core i7-6700K gave it legs against the Acer's Core i7-6700 (the max turbo frequency of the latter is the base clock for the K-series chip) at 1080p.

As you turn up the resolution, the performance gap between the Gaming GT and the Predator G1 becomes wider. Also, the gains made by the factory-overclocked GPU become less defined against our Founder's Edition GTX 1070. By the time we reach 3840 x 2160, the Gigabyte Gaming GT barely manages to keep its lead over our similarly configured reference platform.

DiRT Rally

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Similar to Bioshock, our test settings for DiRT Rally make for almost indiscernible (at least, to the human eye) results between GTX 1070 and GTX 1080-equipped PCs. The Gigabyte Gaming GT takes its familiar position in the lineup at all tested resolutions, besting our GTX 1070 reference rig and providing excellent framerates at 1920 x 1080 (83.44 FPS) and 2560 x 1440 (59.51 FPS). At 4K, the entire lineup struggles to make it above 30 FPS, but backing down the AA and details would make the game quite enjoyable (instead of just barely playable).

Grand Theft Auto V

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GTAV is another power-hungry game, but the Gigabyte Gaming GT puts up a respectable fight against our GTX 1070 test rig, beating it (albeit barely) at all tested resolutions. At 1080p, it comes within a few (3.19) FPS of the Predator G1, but loosening up on the CPU-intensive game settings will change that. Even so, as you turn up the resolution, that performance gap fades away as the graphics cards become the bottleneck.

GRID Autosport

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At its maximum settings, GRID Autosport hardly stresses platforms as powerful as these, but performance improvements (or detriments) to both the CPU and GPU can adversely affect framerates. For instance, the usual placement of these systems gets broken up, with the Gigabyte Gaming GT besting both the Acer Predator G1 and our GTX 1080 test rig at 2560 x 1440, in addition to snagging a win against the Predator at 1080p. Both of these sport GTX 1080s, and the reason for this is undoubtedly CPU performance. However, at 3840 x 2160, the GPU starts to become the bottleneck and the systems line up as you'd expect them to.

Hitman

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Switching to another DX12 benchmark, the Gigabyte performs as we'd expect it to in Hitman; it surpasses our reference-clocked GTX 1070 test rig and stays neck and neck with it at all tested resolutions. However, it's interesting to note that the Gaming GT also yields the lowest minimum framerates, a phenomenon that could be a result of CPU power throttling (not reaching boost state or faulting when trying) that we suspect the BIOS controls.

Metro: Last Light Redux

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If there were ever a perfect game benchmark that could really nail GPU performance, then Metro: Last Light Redux is it. The Gigabyte Gaming GT desktop exhibits lower minimum framerates at 1080p. However, this clears up as you turn the resolution dial up, and the factory-overclocked graphics card ensures that its average framerate will exceed our Founder's Edition GTX 1070 in this GPU-intensive benchmark at any given resolution.

Rise of the Tomb Raider

The Gigabyte Gaming GT desktop PC once again bridges the performance gap between the GTX 1070 and GTX 1080-equipped systems with its above-average GPU clock rate (it's going against reference-clocked GPUs). Again, these are the most-demanding settings available for Rise of the Tomb Raider, and backing down on CPU-intensive effects would greatly improve framerates. However, the pecking order would remain unchanged.

The Division

Although the Gigabyte Gaming GT bests our GTX 1070 test rig (by 0.1 FPS) at 1920 x 1080, it falls behind by a small fraction at 2560 x 1440 and 3840 x 2160. The Division is a DX12 benchmark, and as such, CPU performance can play a role. Monitoring our CPU frequency during our tests revealed similar behavior as with our 3DMark runs; the CPU simply isn't entering boost state as frequently as our test rig at stock settings. The temperatures are in check, so we're going to point our fingers at the locked BIOS and BRIX-style power phases for this one. Despite this, the performance is still on par for the hardware inside, with excellent framerates at 1080p and 1440p. At 4K, most of these systems barely make it over 30 FPS, but the Gaming GT notably finishes farthest from it.

Thief

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As with other games, the Gigabyte Gaming GT finishes up our test suite strong by besting our reference bench (with a GTX 1070) at all tested resolutions in the Thief benchmark. However, before the door closed, the Gaming GT beat down the Predator G1 one last time at 1920 x 1080, scoring a better average and minimum framerate than its GTX 1080-equipped competition. Although the Predator G1 may be a somewhat easy target by now, don't worry. The natural order of things gets restored as you turn up the resolution. However, even at 4K, Thief is quite playable on the Gigabyte Gaming GT.


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  • velocityg4
    To summarize.
    - It has a weak PSU
    - Outdated CPU
    - Outdated Chipset
    - No Overclocking on a chipset and CPU designed for overclocking

    All it has going for it is a decent price. No overclocking is BS. You don't buy an off brand PC for a locked down BIOS and crap PSU. That's what you buy a Dell or HP for.

    They'd have a real winner at that price with a decent 550w PSU and a standard full featured BIOS. You know, like in the Motherboards they sell.

    What is with these reviews of old hardware? Your publication is wasting resources reviewing old tech. Anyone who comes here regularly is well aware of what a GTX 1070, i7-6700K, &c. is capable of. There was nothing new revealed. This product came out last year.

    All I can think is that this computer was a flop. So, Gigabyte dropped the price and paid for a plug. Just to try and clear out a pile of old inventory nobody wanted.
    Reply
  • kibitzer76
    The newegg link for that price does not have the GTX1070.

    "Intel HD Graphics 530"
    Reply
  • kewlguy239
    KIBITZER76, if you scroll down the Newegg product page and look at the specs tab, the GTX 1070 is correctly attributed to this model. The main spec summary at the top is inaccurate (I've reached out to Newegg about this). Good eye!
    Reply
  • sillynilly
    Forget using a DVI cable in there - man wouldn't want to have to make that bend.
    Reply
  • kewlguy239
    Gigabyte includes an angled DVI cable with the Gaming GT, ya Silly Nilly! ;-)
    Reply
  • derekullo
    20004438 said:
    To summarize.
    - It has a weak PSU
    - Outdated CPU
    - Outdated Chipset
    - No Overclocking on a chipset and CPU designed for overclocking

    All it has going for it is a decent price. No overclocking is BS. You don't buy an off brand PC for a locked down BIOS and crap PSU. That's what you buy a Dell or HP for.

    They'd have a real winner at that price with a decent 550w PSU and a standard full featured BIOS. You know, like in the Motherboards they sell.

    What is with these reviews of old hardware? Your publication is wasting resources reviewing old tech. Anyone who comes here regularly is well aware of what a GTX 1070, i7-6700K, &c. is capable of. There was nothing new revealed. This product came out last year.

    All I can think is that this computer was a flop. So, Gigabyte dropped the price and paid for a plug. Just to try and clear out a pile of old inventory nobody wanted.

    To be fair they did mention it was in the shape of a trashcan ...
    Reply
  • SayNO2BS
    At $1100, is there any intel or ryzen build that can beat it at $1100? This is unrivaled value. The 6700K will out run any ryzen for gaming performance. With crypto miners jacking up the GTX1070 to over $500, $100 for Windows 10, what can you build for $500 for the rest of the machine. Heck microcenter has i7-6700k and 7700k at $300, so that is $200 left. 16GB for memory will take up $100, that leave $100 for motherboard and storage... How do you get a nvme 240GB SSD, mobo, CPU cooler, hdmi cables, dvi cables, and 1TB HDD under $100? It can't be done. This is massive value.

    Heck buy it and sell the parts and you might even come out ahead by $200.
    Reply
  • kewlguy239
    20004438 said:
    To summarize.
    - It has a weak PSU
    - Outdated CPU
    - Outdated Chipset
    - No Overclocking on a chipset and CPU designed for overclocking

    All it has going for it is a decent price. No overclocking is BS. You don't buy an off brand PC for a locked down BIOS and crap PSU. That's what you buy a Dell or HP for.

    They'd have a real winner at that price with a decent 550w PSU and a standard full featured BIOS. You know, like in the Motherboards they sell.

    What is with these reviews of old hardware? Your publication is wasting resources reviewing old tech. Anyone who comes here regularly is well aware of what a GTX 1070, i7-6700K, &c. is capable of. There was nothing new revealed. This product came out last year.

    All I can think is that this computer was a flop. So, Gigabyte dropped the price and paid for a plug. Just to try and clear out a pile of old inventory nobody wanted.

    I would have to take most of the blame for the late entry of this review. The device was shipped to me in March, but a combination of travel and other projects kept me away from the desktop review beat for a while. Now that I'm back on it, it was a happy coincidence that Gigabyte dropped the price, and because the product is still readily available, we thought it was still worth the review. We have another Z170 review coming out soon too, under the exact same circumstances (still available, price dropped). But don't worry, Z270 reviews are on the way!

    The idea that Gigabyte or any other company pays us for "plugs" is laughable. I did basically refer to it as a trash can, so how does that work for an official endorsement? Furthermore, the award status is always up to the editorial staff, and for the pricing alone we felt it was worth at least a recommended award (the lowest of our applicable awards). We know good deals when we see them, and despite the Gaming GT's shortcomings (no overclocking, grrrr), we feel it's worth a nod for the hardware inside.
    Reply
  • rwinches
    Buy this, strip the parts out, get a used/referb MB better PS and new case.
    You could sell the 1070 on eBay and get a Vega 64 or you could sell the 1070 on eBay and keep the GPU you have.
    Turn the original into a HTPC with a few parts.
    Many options if you have the bucks.
    Reply
  • velocityg4
    20005839 said:

    I would have to take most of the blame for the late entry of this review. The device was shipped to me in March, but a combination of travel and other projects kept me away from the desktop review beat for a while. Now that I'm back on it, it was a happy coincidence that Gigabyte dropped the price, and because the product is still readily available, we thought it was still worth the review. We have another Z170 review coming out soon too, under the exact same circumstances (still available, price dropped). But don't worry, Z270 reviews are on the way!

    The idea that Gigabyte or any other company pays us for "plugs" is laughable. I did basically refer to it as a trash can, so how does that work for an official endorsement? Furthermore, the award status is always up to the editorial staff, and for the pricing alone we felt it was worth at least a recommended award (the lowest of our applicable awards). We know good deals when we see them, and despite the Gaming GT's shortcomings (no overclocking, grrrr), we feel it's worth a nod for the hardware inside.

    Ah, the sudden influx of reviews of old tech was just starting to get suspicious.

    Anyways, I don't think your review unit and the link for Newegg are the same. As far as I can tell the linked unit does not have an OS installed. It is sold under the barebone category. While the review mentioned software being included. Perhaps I missed it but I saw no mention of you having to install Windows.

    I suppose that is why Gigabyte has to sell them at a discount. The market of people whom are confident enough to install an OS but not assemble a computer yet spend what was originally close to $2K must be quite small.
    Reply