Motorola Moto G (3rd gen) Review

Conclusion

When Motorola launched the first Moto G, it struck a chord with people who did not want to pay $600 or more for a smartphone but needed a basic phone that “just worked.” Now in its third generation, the Moto G has evolved, overcoming many of its earlier shortcomings.

The upgrade to Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 410 SoC brings a 4G LTE modem and a significant boost to system performance. The user interface is more responsive, web pages load quicker and scroll more smoothly, and overall lag is reduced. More memory bandwidth and faster internal storage also help apps launch quicker and help the Moto G feel more mid-range than entry-level. This is especially true if you spend the extra $40 to get the model with 2GB of RAM and 16GB of internal storage.

While overall system performance improves, graphics performance takes a small step backwards. The Moto G (3rd gen) is about 10% slower when playing games compared to the previous generation, whose performance was hardly stellar. Most casual games and 2D scrollers should play smoothly, but more intense 3D titles, while mostly playable, will experience some stutters and possibly be missing some graphical features.

One area where the Moto G (3rd gen) really shines is battery life. It’s relatively large 2470mAh battery, 400mAh bigger than the previous Moto G, makes it one of the longest-lasting phones we’ve tested while running a moderate workload. In normal use, we were getting anywhere from one to three days of battery life depending on how frequently we turned it on and how bright the screen was.

Speaking of the screen, Motorola continues to place an emphasis on display calibration, improving on the previous generation and giving the Moto G what's likely the most accurate display of any mid-range phone. Color accuracy is better than on some of the flagship phones we've tested. Screen brightness and viewing angles are also good, but one flaw tarnishes an otherwise good display: a hazy coating reduces sharpness and vibrancy.

The Moto G’s new rear camera is capable of shooting some nice photos, especially in bright light or when using its flash. In these conditions, image noise remains low but noise reduction processing smears away fine detail. Its color accuracy is generally good, but there’s a tendency for photos to appear a little too yellow. The Moto G’s HDR mode presents a similar story: It produces some nice results, although its results can look a bit less natural than other cameras. With less light available, the Moto G’s camera performs on par with other 13 MP shooters.

All of this hardware is wrapped in a simple but attractive package. The third-generation Moto G keeps to the design language used by Motorola on previous phones, but gets an updated removable rear cover with a pattern of ridges, making the phone easy to grip. There's also a new metal accent strip surrounding the rear camera. What really sets the Moto G and other Moto phones apart from the crowd, however, is the ability to customize the appearance through Motorola's Moto Maker website. Combining different colors for the front, back, and rear accent strip is a fun way to custom order a phone that satisfies your personal taste.

The Moto G runs 32-bit Android Lollipop as it comes from Google, providing a clean and uncluttered experience that’s free of the typical OEM and carrier bloatware. Motorola does replace the stock Android Camera app with its own simplified version and adds its Moto app for controlling the few features it adds such as gesture-based controls for quickly opening the camera or turning on the flashlight and Moto Display, a different spin on Android’s Ambient Display feature. The only downside is that stock Android is missing a few capabilities most OEM skins add, including customization options. You’ll need to be comfortable installing third-party solutions if you want more control over how the operating system looks and works.

The well-calibrated display, quality internal components, good cameras, solid build quality, and uncluttered software experience give the Moto G a polished feel many phones in this price range lack. Combining this with a relatively large battery that lasted longer than nearly every phone we’ve ever tested, makes Motorola’s latest mid-range phone a compelling choice.

Lucian Armasu is a Contributing Writer for Tom's Hardware, covering News. Follow him on Twitter, Facebook and Google+.

Matt Humrick is a Staff Editor at Tom's Hardware, covering Smartphones and Tablets. Follow him on Twitter.

Follow Tom's Hardware on Twitter, Facebook and Google+.

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24 comments
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  • utroz
    Not bad for a relatively cheap phone..
  • InvalidError
    Yay, one more seemingly decent ~$200 phone that isn't Asia-only.
  • MasterWandu
    Just got the 16GB phone. Best value for money phone I have ever owned. Cannot believe the quality / specs at the price point. It's about as quick / specc'ed as my Nexus 4 that it replaces, but it trumps the Nexus 4 with it's expandable memory and 4G/LTE capabilities. Couldn't recommend it more!
  • gangrel
    I don't game on my phone, so that's never been an issue for me. I do note that app install speeds are very good; download speed I can't really say, as I do all of that on wifi, not cell. I'm quite happy with it.
  • RCFProd
    Had to choose the even cheaper Xiaomi Redmi Note 2 over this one.
  • Glock24
    Why is the ZenFone 2 listed in the specs / comparison table , but not on benchmarks? It's $20 cheaper than the Moto G 16GB/2GB
  • MattBoothDev
    Only issue is it released a couple of months ago, but isn't getting Marshmallow. Bit poor, that.
  • RCFProd
    2118962 said:
    Only issue is it released a couple of months ago, but isn't getting Marshmallow. Bit poor, that.


    it is getting Marshmallow no?
    http://www.androidstandard.com/android-m-will-hit-moto-g-3rd-gen-and-2nd-gen-in-this-fall/
  • ZolaIII
    Not impressed. There are similar spec Chinese phone's with more than 2x lower price like for instance Elephane Trunk. I know it's weird Elephone made a decent phone but strange things happen. As much as Motorola got a developer community and long suport it's not worth 2+x.
  • MobileEditor
    Quote:
    Why is the ZenFone 2 listed in the specs / comparison table , but not on benchmarks? It's $20 cheaper than the Moto G 16GB/2GB


    There are two different versions of the ZenFone 2 (well more if you count the special editions). The less expensive version is shown in the spec table since it's closer in price to the Moto G. We only tested the more expensive version with a faster SoC, so that's why it's not in the benchmark charts. Plus, we already included the more expensive/faster Z8 as the upper bound in the charts. I figured this was more relevant, since it has a more common SoC configuration.

    - Matt Humrick, Mobile Editor, Tom's Hardware
  • gangrel
    How many of those Chinese phones are available outside Asia? And what else are you sacrificing with them?

    One major advantage of the Motorola phones is *minimal* add-ons, and most of em aren't intrusive at all. I don't like most skins. Another point: I have high confidence that Motorola will release security patches very quickly. I have no confidence that some budget Chinese maker will put ANY effort into this.
  • InvalidError
    764133 said:
    I have high confidence that Motorola will release security patches very quickly. I have no confidence that some budget Chinese maker will put ANY effort into this.

    No need to look at no-name brands either: Acer has a poor reputation with dropping firmware updates for their low-end devices merely months from launch.
  • ZolaIII
    764133 said:
    How many of those Chinese phones are available outside Asia? And what else are you sacrificing with them? One major advantage of the Motorola phones is *minimal* add-ons, and most of em aren't intrusive at all. I don't like most skins. Another point: I have high confidence that Motorola will release security patches very quickly. I have no confidence that some budget Chinese maker will put ANY effort into this.

    Not much but hire is one & from Chinese firm behind it that is known for regular updates. It's currently available only in Asian Pacific region but Alcatel is officially present in much more (especially EU) countries than Motorola so it's expected that it arrives & on other markets. By all means it's not perfect but it beats Moto G 3rd gen in lot aspects that are important by the view of general users.

    As I don't want to advertise anyone I will mention only manufacturer & product name so if you are interested in more details browse & particularly pay attention to user opinions & review about it.

    It's Alcatel Flash 2.
  • cypeq
    Moto continues to stomp the market with budget offering that leaves 600$ phones with big question mark near 'why bother'.
  • RCFProd
    309074 said:
    Moto continues to stomp the market with budget offering that leaves 600$ phones with big question mark near 'why bother'.


    As a former 2nd Gen Moto G owner I'd say It's far from that situation.
  • kaalus
    The biggest problem with this phone is poor screen resolution. 5" screen with 720p is way too low. Get a Nexus 5 instead (still available through eBay). It's cheaper. It's smaller with a proper screen. Has no SD card or waterproofing though. But has a faster CPU and already runs Marshmallow.
  • gangrel
    Alcatel Flash 2 is Asian market, and has limited LTE bands...questionable whether it'd work in the US.
  • InvalidError
    173767 said:
    The biggest problem with this phone is poor screen resolution. 5" screen with 720p is way too low.

    720p on a 5" display is already 293ppi, high enough that most people won't really notice resolution any higher than that unless they specifically look for differences. It may seem "way too low" for marketing purposes but as far as real-world usability is concerned, it is perfectly fine for an almost entry-level device.

    Personally, the lack of an SD slot on Nexus devices is a much bigger deal-breaker.
  • DbD2
    Quote:
    How many of those Chinese phones are available outside Asia? And what else are you sacrificing with them? One major advantage of the Motorola phones is *minimal* add-ons, and most of em aren't intrusive at all. I don't like most skins. Another point: I have high confidence that Motorola will release security patches very quickly. I have no confidence that some budget Chinese maker will put ANY effort into this.


    You can buy them all on amazon, they don't generally come with much bloat, and you get twice the phone the current moto g gives you. The main place you suffer is android updates. Imo this latest moto g is still not what the first one was. When that came out it combined what was at the time mid range hardware/screen/etc at a significantly lower price. Now it's distinctly low end with it's low res screen and slow processor.
  • RCFProd
    The 1GB RAM was actually a big issue with the Moto G 2014. It was actually quite slow. Has this been fixed with the new 1GB RAM 2015 model?
  • MobileEditor
    Quote:
    The 1GB RAM was actually a big issue with the Moto G 2014. It was actually quite slow. Has this been fixed with the new 1GB RAM 2015 model?


    As shown on page 7 of the review, the new Moto G has significantly more memory bandwidth than the previous model, in addition to better CPU performance. So no, memory speed is not an issue like it was before.

    - Matt Humrick, Mobile Editor, Tom's Hardware
  • RCFProd
    Actually looks very solid. I love the phone's design even more this year aswell. It's worth considering over the Xiaomi Redmi Note 2, because the support for the phone is simply very very good.
  • RealityOfIt
    Motorola does not sell the XT1548 on their web site and it is not for sale unless through a carrier or service provider. Even though they advertise it as "unlocked". This article should have made this information clear to the readers.
  • RCFProd
    I bought one since I've become a big fan of Motorola since Google took over. The phone runs decent enough, the Android stock experience is beautiful and the phone's design is great and very well built.

    I'm scared because Motorola has been making solid phones but they're not making profit so Google sold them to Lenovo. It's sad when absolutely great phones go unnoticed by the majority because of the Samsung and Apple hierarchy. Hate the fact Motorola is no part of Google anymore. Hopefully Lenovo has great plans with Moto.