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NEC EA275WMi 27-inch QHD IPS Monitor Review

There are few monitors engineered or built better than those from NEC. Today we’re testing the EA275WMi, a 27" QHD-resolution IPS panel with features that will appeal to enterprise and business-class users.

Grayscale, Gamma & Color

Grayscale Tracking

Our grayscale and gamma tests are described in detail here.

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The EA275WMi comes set to its Native color temp preset which is identical to the sRGB memory. Both are adjustable for brightness and contrast, but only the numbered memories allow access to the RGB sliders. We can recommend this monitor as one that doesn’t require calibration. There are barely-visible errors that show a slight purple tint in test patterns. It’s much harder to see in real-world content.

But you can achieve even better tracking by starting in Mode 3 as we did. A few tweaks brings us to a near-perfect state. This approach also improves gamma tracking. We’ll show you more details on that below.

Comparisons

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2.44dE is a fine level for a business-class monitor straight out of the box. The greater precision and factory calibration that comes in higher-priced displays isn’t a factor here. But the EA275WMi offers very respectable performance. Calibration takes grayscale tracking to the professional level with only minor adjustments. .86dE puts it among the best screens in our database.

Gamma Response

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If there’s one thing we’d like to see fixed here, it’s the gamma tracking. The rising trace means color will look a little less vivid and some highlight detail may not pop out as much. It’s a relatively minor error and calibration will visibly reduce the problem. You’ll see the effect in our color gamut and luminance charts below.

Comparisons

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The range of gamma values isn’t too wide but it does mean a fifth-place finish for the EA275WMi. The average value is 2.31 which is fairly close to our preferred 2.2 spec. That’s a slight reduction from the 2.44 level we started at. Overall impact from this error is small, but if you want the best possible color saturation without going outside Rec.709, accurate gamma is important.

Color Gamut & Luminance

For details on our color gamut testing and volume calculations, please click here.

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The EA275WMi shows slight over-saturation in the red and blue primaries and the magenta secondary. There is some compensation provided by lowered luminance levels, but color brightness is down a little across the board. Running at higher backlight settings will alleviate this, and our overall impression of the monitor’s image quality is still quite favorable. These charts show the effects of gamma tracking quite clearly.

Calibration helps bring the aforementioned over-saturated colors closer to their targets. Now they are barely outside the spec. Luminance levels are a bit higher as well. While we still maintain that this monitor can be used and enjoyed without calibration, there is some quality to be gained by making the right adjustments.

Comparisons

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An average error level of 2.67dE puts the EA275WMi right in the middle of the pack. While none of these screens are billed as professional products, the ViewSonic does include a factory-certified calibration, hence its top result. Considering how stringent our test is, we have no complaints about any of the monitors here. They all offer excellent color that will satisfy all but the pickiest users.