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Super Flower Leadex Platinum 550W PSU Review

Super Flower responds to the high demand for low-capacity and highly efficient PSUs with the release of its Leadex Platinum with 550 W max power. This unit packs high performance, silent operation and Platinum efficiency.

Pros, Cons And Final Verdict

Nowadays, many users seek a top-notch and low-to-medium-capacity PSU. Very few offerings exist in this category, however, and even fewer of them have Platinum efficiency. Currently, the only PSUs with Platinum efficiency and 550 W capacity that can compete with the SF-550F14MP in performance and noise output are the passively cooled Seasonic SS-520FL and the Enermax EDF550AWN. Both of these units, however, cost much more than Super Flower's model. We deliberately compared this Leadex model with two passive PSUs because it has such low noise output that its operation reminds us of a pure passive PSU. Super Flower managed to significantly lower the noise output by increasing efficiency, which leads to minimized energy losses and lower thermal loads. At the same time, the company increased the effective period of the passive mode and relaxed the fan profile as much as possible.

We aren't very fond of long-lasting passive modes in PSUs, since we believe that lots of stress is applied to sensitive components like electrolytic capacitors. As we pointed out in our recent PSU 101 article, a 10 C increase in an electrolytic capacitor's operating temperature cuts its life span in half. However, in this case we have a low-capacity and highly efficient PSU equipped with top-notch capacitors. On top of that, Super Flower backs it up with a five-year warranty.

Super Flower made a very strong entry in the high-end, lower-capacity category and given the company’s increased activity in the PSU market, we won't be surprised if they release a low-capacity Titanium unit in the near future as well. The SF-550F14MP offers tight load regulation, amazing ripple suppression and high efficiency that is between 90 and 95 percent throughout a very large part of the unit’s operational range. Additionally, this model is by far the most silent PSU that we have tested in this category, and under normal conditions it will mostly operate in passive mode if you select the ECO mode. Even when the fan is engaged, it spins at very low speeds, making very low noise. We had to push the PSU to its limits and in some cases beyond them, in order to make the fan spin at 1000 RPM. Even in this worst-case scenario the noise level didn't exceed 36 dBA. The only downsides of this fine PSU are the lower-than-minimum-allowed hold-up time, the mediocre performance of the 3.3V rail in the Advanced Transient Response tests, and the higher price.

In our opinion, if you need a high-performance PSU with low capacity and an inaudible operation, then you should seriously consider buying the SF-550F14MP. In the U.S. market Super Flower doesn't have a retail presence, but EVGA's T2, P2, G2 and B2 offerings are based on Super Flower's platforms. This means that we will most likely see an EVGA SuperNOVA 550 P2 unit in the near future.

MORE: PSUs 101: A Detailed Look Into Power Supplies
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Power Supplies in the Forums

Aris Mpitziopoulos is a Contributing Editor for Tom's Hardware, covering Power Supplies.

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  • laviniuc
    you mean P2, right?

    "This means that we will most likely see an EVGA SuperNOVA 550 T2 unit in the near future."
    Reply
  • envy14tpe
    The 650W version sells for $85usd (here in Taiwan) and 750W for $100. Not sure why this company doesn't sell more internationally since it is at the top tier. As it is known for quality. Gonna be picking up a SuperFlower PSU with my next build.
    Reply
  • MasterMace
    Last page error: a 10C increase is not a 50F increase.
    Reply
  • Aris_Mp
    this is why I avoid putting F in my articles :)
    Reply
  • blazorthon
    Google will gladly do the conversions for you :D
    Reply
  • Aris_Mp
    actually it did and still says that 10C is 50F.
    Reply
  • casey_souder
    actually it did and still says that 10C is 50F.
    A change of 1 degree C equals a 1.8 degree F change. Google is doing a temperature conversion, not a unit conversion.
    Reply
  • Roj Number 1
    Yes, 10C = 50F, but a 10C increase in temperature is a 18F increase in temp. Two different things.
    Reply
  • Aris_Mp
    you are right of course. Thanks! Just my mind got stuck.
    Reply
  • FritzEiv
    I forgot to tell you, Aris, there WILL be math.
    Reply