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Asus ProArt PA32UCX Review: First Mini-LED Monitor Wows

Testing the first PC monitor with a mini-LED backlight and one of two with Dolby Vision.

Asus ProArt PA32UCX Review
Editor's Choice
(Image: © Asus)

HDR is what the PA32UCX is all about. With 1,152 dimming zones and a super-bright backlight, it has the goods to beat all comers in the quest for the broadest dynamic range. To measure levels and contrast, we used 10% window patterns (the window covers 10% of the screen) and set local dimming to Fast.

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Asus rates the PA32UCX at 1,200 nits peak brightness in HDR mode, but we managed nearly 1,500 nits when measuring a window pattern that covered 10% of the screen, which allows more voltage to be allocated to the central dimming zones. When viewing HDR material, highlights leaped off the screen but were never harsh or overblown.

The black level is difficult to measure since the backlight is almost fully turned off when a 0% brightness signal is displayed. The other FALD screens here can’t even come close to the PA32UCX’s 0.0026 nit. Resulting sequential contrast is a staggering 569,629.1:1. It’s difficult to illustrate what this means in terms of image quality. The PA32UCX produces the finest image we’ve ever seen on a computer monitor.

Grayscale, EOTF and Color

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The PA32UCX locks out all calibration controls in HDR mode, so there is no way to alter the default EOTF luminance curve or grayscale tracking. Luckily, this wasn’t an issue, as the white point is spot-on and the luminance is only slightly dark. In all HDR modes, there are additional options for optimization that can be used to match the PA32UCX’s output to a variety of different consumer displays. The color gamut charts show close conformity of all saturation targets, save for slight under-saturation in red and blue. These are correctable with Asus ProArt software. All our test results show reference-level HDR and extended color accuracy. It truly doesn’t get better than this.

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Christian Eberle
Christian Eberle is a Contributing Editor for Tom's Hardware US. He's a veteran reviewer of A/V equipment, specializing in monitors.