50 Gigabit Internet Can Be Yours for Only $900 a Month

internet
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Ever wanted to be the first in your neighborhood with a 50 Gbps Internet plan? If you live in the right areas of the Pacific Northwest and can be serviced by the Ziply Fiber Internet Service Provider, you actually can sign up for such obscenely powerful Internet service! With some very important caveats, of course.

For one, anyone who wants to hop onto this 50 Gbps Internet plan on offer from Ziply is going to need to cough up $900 a month for the privilege, as reported by PCMag. This would be expensive anywhere in the country, but is particularly pricey considering the average cost of housing in the Pacific Midwest. 

Beyond the basic monthly cost, users will also need to provide their own router and networking equipment that can actually utilize 50 Gbps internet. The Ziply-recommended MikroTik Router for this purpose comes with 16GB of onboard RAM and costs over $2000 on Amazon at the time of writing. This simply... isn't in the range of most consumers (or even enthusiasts), though some will still bite for the novelty of the experience, anyway.

Ziply Fiber's service area map as of November 2023.

(Image credit: Ziply Fiber)

More realistically, most of the United States deals with a national average of about 250 Mbps Internet speeds, with even single Gb only just becoming more commonplace recently. A whopping 50Gb of Internet throughput isn't just well beyond the actual performance of most client devices (most Ethernet ports are only 1Gb), but exponentially beyond the performance of the average US internet speed, as well.

Even the upcoming Wi-Fi 7 standard, which is slated to provide a four time speed increase over Wi-Fi 6E, can't reach the maximum throughput offered by a 50 Gbps network. The maximum capabilities of Wi-Fi 7 is up to 46 Gbps, which is a best-case scenario. Realistically, you're unlikely to reach the full speeds of 50 Gbps internet on any modern wireless network, and even most wired networks are going to be hard-pressed to utilize all those Gb unless you invest in things like multi-gig Ethernet expansion cards.

So, does that make this whole spotlight on 50 Gbps internet a waste of time? Maybe, but Ziply seems determined to kick the door open on this highest-yet tier of home internet speeds in the United States. Ten years ago, even widely-available single Gb internet seemed like a pipe dream. In another ten years, I doubt 50 Gbps Fiber internet plans like this one will be mainstream... but I'd be surprised if multi-gig Internet wasn't more commonplace, either.

After all, internet plans like this make perfect sense for enterprise and education customers in the present day. 50 Gbps can get broken up pretty fast when you have 50 or more individual users on the same connection. 

I'm not sure there's anything a family of residential users can do to eat up a full 50 Gbps of bandwidth today, though. Even ten years from now, that level of network saturation sounds pretty extreme.

Freelance News Writer
  • USAFRet
    For a residential user, anything much past 100/100 megabits is hard to justify.

    If you're running a big internet cafe, then that performance at $900/mo might be justified.

    At home? Not a chance.
    Reply
  • palladin9479
    Then we discover the ISP is using 10Gbe interconnects between circuits.
    Reply
  • HideOut
    USAFRet said:
    For a residential user, anything much past 100/100 megabits is hard to justify.

    If you're running a big internet cafe, then that performance at $900/mo might be justified.

    At home? Not a chance.
    I have ATT fiber, the service thats not listed cause ima tightwad. Its 300/300 (i get about 360/370 on average). Its amazing, and about $50/month. Massive game and windows updates are so much easier to download. You'd be surprised how nice it is. 1G service is a waste for most though. Even streaming 4K HDR only takese 30-60megs/sec, if that. Most shows you stream arn't maxing out their theorhetical limits. for a single occupancy on a budget 300/300 is very nice. If you have several people in the house then I can see the noraml "base" of 500/500 being somewhat useful. 100/100 isn't enough for a decent sized streaming family though.
    Reply
  • USAFRet
    HideOut said:
    I have ATT fiber, the service thats not listed cause ima tightwad. Its 300/300 (i get about 360/370 on average). Its amazing, and about $50/month. Massive game and windows updates are so much easier to download. You'd be surprised how nice it is. 1G service is a waste for most though. Even streaming 4K HDR only takese 30-60megs/sec, if that. Most shows you stream arn't maxing out their theorhetical limits. for a single occupancy on a budget 300/300 is very nice. If you have several people in the house then I can see the noraml "base" of 500/500 being somewhat useful. 100/100 isn't enough for a decent sized streaming family though.
    I'll amend my above.....500/500 is enough, IF you have a largish family.

    For me and the spouse, 100/100 is just fine.
    Reply
  • vanadiel007
    Admin said:
    Ziply recently launched a 50 Gbps Internet plan for users in the Pacific Northwest region, but even users who can afford the $900/mo price of entry will find it hard to justify.

    50 Gigabit Internet Can Be Yours for Only $900 a Month : Read more
    USAFRet said:
    For a residential user, anything much past 100/100 megabits is hard to justify.

    If you're running a big internet cafe, then that performance at $900/mo might be justified.

    At home? Not a chance.

    I remember in the early days of the internet, when we were all using dial-up, the idea that someday a residential user would have a 1Mbit connection was considered impossible and very costly and for sure not needed.
    Who needs more than 56 Kflex or 56 V90 speeds, right? Many ISP's ran off a 1 Mbit symmetrical connection in those days.

    Same for MSDOS, where nobody would ever need more than 640 Kbit of memory. More than 1 Mbyte of memory was unthinkable for a home user. That was the domain of main frames.

    Hard drives larger than 240 Mbyte was for corporate servers, not for home users unless you wanted to shelve out $1,000 for the amazing pleasure of having a 500 Mbyte hard drive.

    Things change, and some day in the not so distant future we will be needing gigabit connectivity to stream those 32K HD movies to our home entertainment walls with 16.1 HD surround sound. Anything lesser quality would be unthinkable.
    Reply
  • pointa2b
    For normal desktop use it isn't that useful, but this opens up the possibility of running all kinds of bandwidth intensive services on your home connection (seedboxes, file hosting, etc). If the ISP ToS doesn't allow this though, outside of what people said above like large internet cafes, there isn't much (current) benefit to having a connection like this. 1 gigabit symmetric is already insane.
    Reply
  • USAFRet
    vanadiel007 said:
    I remember in the early days of the internet, when we were all using dial-up, the idea that someday a residential user would have a 1Mbit connection was considered impossible and very costly and for sure not needed.
    Who needs more than 56 Kflex or 56 V90 speeds, right? Many ISP's ran off a 1 Mbit symmetrical connection in those days.

    Same for MSDOS, where nobody would ever need more than 640 Kbit of memory. More than 1 Mbyte of memory was unthinkable for a home user. That was the domain of main frames.

    Hard drives larger than 240 Mbyte was for corporate servers, not for home users unless you wanted to shelve out $1,000 for the amazing pleasure of having a 500 Mbyte hard drive.

    Things change, and some day in the not so distant future we will be needing gigabit connectivity to stream those 32K HD movies to our home entertainment walls with 16.1 HD surround sound. Anything lesser quality would be unthinkable.
    Sure.

    I was one of the first of my friends to move beyond dialup, into 1mbs "broadband" in the mid-90s.

    25 years later....100/100 still suffices.

    My current GPU has more memory than my first dozen PCs had RAM and hard drive space, combined.

    Yes, things need to increase. But there does come a point of diminishing returns.

    And listening to the ISP ads..."You NEED gigabit!!" is, currently, wasteful.
    Reply
  • vanadiel007
    pointa2b said:
    For normal desktop use it isn't that useful, but this opens up the possibility of running all kinds of bandwidth intensive services on your home connection (seedboxes, file hosting, etc). If the ISP ToS doesn't allow this though, outside of what people said above like large internet cafes, there isn't much (current) benefit to having a connection like this. 1 gigabit symmetric is already insane.

    Well, I have the option to upgrade from 1.5/1 to 3/3. I might actually do it. Not because I need it, but because the modem for the 1.5/1 package only provides gigabit LAN ports.
    The modem for the 3/3 provides 2.5G ports + an SFP+ port.
    I can upgrade my modem for an extra $10/month, which just happens to be the price difference between my current plan and the new plan...So, why not grab the extra speed I don't need.
    Reply
  • vanadiel007
    USAFRet said:
    Sure.

    I was one of the first of my friends to move beyond dialup, into 1mbs "broadband" in the mid-90s.

    25 years later....100/100 still suffices.

    My current GPU has more memory than my first dozen PCs had RAM and hard drive space, combined.

    Yes, things need to increase. But there does come a point of diminishing returns.

    And listening to the ISP ads..."You NEED gigabit!!" is, currently, wasteful.

    The slowest I can get is 50/50 FTTH, which is $65/month, 500/500 is $75/month, 1.5/1 is $80 and 3/3 is $90. There's also 8/8 plans but not in my area yet. But it's coming.

    I am at 1.5/1 and I would not go back to anything less, unless there was no other option. With some game downloads being 45 GB or larger, it would simply take to long to download and install over a 100/100 connection.
    Reply
  • tazzmonster
    This could be a service for a community to share among households. Maybe an apartment complex or a group of neighbors sharing the service and cost.
    Reply