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AMD GPU and CPU Drivers Add Windows 11 Support, Unified Auto Overclocking

AMD Ryzen and Radeon Logos
(Image credit: AMD)

AMD has released new Radeon Software Adrenalin and Ryzen chipset drivers to pave the way for Windows 11. Besides Windows 11 support, the latest drivers also bring new features for Radeon gamers, including an auto-overclocking function for AMD-powered systems.

With the Radeon Software Adrenalin 21.9.1 driver, consumers who own a system with a Ryzen 5000 Zen 3 processor and Radeon RX 6000 graphics card can squeeze extra performance our of both components with a click of a button (or at least just a few clicks). The new auto overclocking feature is located inside the "Tuning" sub tab that's under the "Performance" tab in AMD's Radeon software. There's also a separate tuning section for overclocking processors only.  

In addition to the auto overclocking feature, the Radeon Software Adrenalin 21.9.1 driver also unlocks the Smart Access Memory (SAM) technology for AMD's previous Radeon RX 5000 graphics cards, as long as they're paired with a Ryzen 5000 or compatible Ryzen 3000 Zen 2 chips on an AMD 500-series motherboard. AMD has also expanded FidelityFX Super Resolution (FSR) support for up to 27 different titles.

In other news, the Ryzen chipset 3.09.01.140 driver ushers in support for Windows 11 as well. The list of supported chipsets include WRX80, TRX40, 500-series, X399, 400-series and 300-series. Not all Ryzen chips are compatible with Windows 11, though. The list of unsupported processors includes first-generation Ryzen and Threadripper parts, Ryzen 2000G, mobile 2000U and seventh-generation A-series APUs.

You can download latest Radeon Software Adrenalin and Ryzen chipset drivers for your system on AMD.com.

  • VforV
    Look at all those games supporting FSR, in about 2 months after launch!

    It has support in almost half the games DLSS has, GJ AMD.

    How many games had DLSS support after 2 months from launch? Or 1 year after? Rofl.

    Now only if nvidia wouldn't block FSR in some games, that would be even better, but I guess it's naive to think that will happen...
    Reply
  • ohio_buckeye
    Even if they block that in some current games, if it's easy enough to implement going forward, you might see developers adding it in. You have to think though, Nvidia spent a lot of time and money marketing DLSS etc, so they probably want to make as much from that feature as they can.
    Reply
  • hotaru.hino
    DLSS had growing pains implementing it, but DLSS 2.0 essentially requires the engine supporting some temporal anti-aliasing if I read the material correctly. Granted, while FSR doesn't require temporal antialiasing, or accounting for pixel history, I don't think FSR will ever attain the same level of quality because having history does help with reconstruction.

    Granted FSR may attain "good enough" for most people and that's all that really matters in the grand scheme of things.
    Reply
  • VforV
    hotaru.hino said:
    DLSS had growing pains implementing it, but DLSS 2.0 essentially requires the engine supporting some temporal anti-aliasing if I read the material correctly. Granted, while FSR doesn't require temporal antialiasing, or accounting for pixel history, I don't think FSR will ever attain the same level of quality because having history does help with reconstruction.

    Granted FSR may attain "good enough" for most people and that's all that really matters in the grand scheme of things.
    Yes, I agree if we are talking about FSR 1.0 only.

    We already know AMD is working internally with already improvements on FSR 2.0. And the truth is FSR from 1.0 how it is now has a lot more room to grow than DLSS 2.2 has... DLSS is already almost as good as it can be, it will have some, but very little extra improvement going forward.
    Reply
  • lazyabum
    AMDs GPU drivers should be in tip top shape since been no time producing GPUs for PCs
    Reply
  • hotaru.hino
    lazyabum said:
    AMDs GPU drivers should be in tip top shape since been no time producing GPUs for PCs
    AMD doesn't spend its own workforce producing GPUs anyway.
    Reply