AMD's Motherboard Support for 24GB and 48GB RAM Is Wonky

AMD socket AM5 motherboard and Ryzen CPU.
(Image credit: Shutterstock)

Corsair and Crucial have launched high-density DDR5 memory modules with 24GB and 48GB capacities. Memory vendors have used Intel platforms to demonstrate the new memory kits. AMD's platform may be just as capable - with the correct optimizations.

It's important to distinguish between what's officially supported and what works. For example, Intel 12th Generation Alder Lake and 13th Generation Raptor Lake processors and AMD Ryzen 7000 (Raphael) Zen 4 processors officially support up to 128GB of DDR5 memory. So while higher capacity support (192GB) isn't entirely off the table, it depends on whether your chip can handle it. It's similar to the case of the official supported memory speed on processors and Intel XMP or AMD EXPO overclocking. Faster memory kits will work, but you're on your own, and your mileage will vary. Whether pushing the speed envelope or capacity threshold, the motherboard plays a vital role.

For example, MSI and Gigabyte claim that their respective Intel 600-series and 700-series motherboards are compatible with 24GB and 48GB DDR5 DIMMs without a firmware update. On the contrary, ASRock and Asus have released special firmware to usher in support of the new capacities. However, there's one thing in common; they're all Intel platforms, and there's not even one peep from AMD.

Twitter user MEGAsizeGPU got Corsair's latest Vengeance DDR5-5600 48GB (2x24GB) memory to post on his system powered by a Ryzen 5 7600X and ROG Strix B650E-E Gaming WiFi motherboard. However, the hardware enthusiast showed that while the system apparently posted OK, it was unable to enter the operating system due to a hardware error. The current AMD AGESA firmware may already support 24GB and 48GB DDR5 memory modules. If not, the memory training would fail, and the system will likely refuse to boot. Getting past the BIOS screen is progress, but it's evident that there's still a bit of room for optimization.

Presently, there aren't many 24GB and 48GB DDR5 options. Although Corsair and Crucial have unveiled their 24GB and 48GB DDR5 memory kits, only the former's offerings have arrived on the retail market, and they cost an arm and a leg. However, with Intel motherboards embracing the new memory modules, we expect AMD motherboards to catch up soon. As DDR5 continues to evolve rapidly, the 24GB and 48GB DIMM capacities will become more widespread.

Zhiye Liu
RAM Reviewer and News Editor

Zhiye Liu is a Freelance News Writer at Tom’s Hardware US. Although he loves everything that’s hardware, he has a soft spot for CPUs, GPUs, and RAM.

  • PlaneInTheSky
    32GB RAM is already becoming a minimum for new gaming PC.

    Consoles have 16GB shared VRAM, and the amount of data these consoles can copy from the SSD directly into VRAM in milliseconds is crazy.

    The only way PC are able to keep up with consoles is with large pools of RAM. Many games are now recommending 32GB RAM.
    Reply
  • TechieTwo
    There is nothing "Wonky" about the AMD platform using 24/48 GB DDR 5 DRAM. The DRAM makers always support Intel first because that's where the higher volume sales are. As with all DRAM before there are typically DRAM that is tested to work best on AMD or on Intel systems. At the default JEDEC speeds/settings these DRAM modules work fine in both AMD and Intel because that is how the memory controllers and DRAM are designed.

    When the DRAM makers start overclocking their DRAM for huge profit then they need to determine the proper timings that will allow their DRAM to function reliably on either an AMD or on an Intel system and advertise the DRAM accordingly.

    All DRAM running faster than the JEDEC default specification for DDR 2/3/4/5, etc. is overclocked DRAM and not guaranteed to work unless your mobo and memory controller decide to play nice together.
    Reply
  • Amdlova
    Amd ever a nightmare with compatability. Remember the first ryzen. Lol I have to purchase four kits to make the system stable. Even the motherboard list has flaws
    Reply
  • NightLight
    Amdlova said:
    Amd ever a nightmare with compatability. Remember the first ryzen. Lol I have to purchase four kits to make the system stable. Even the motherboard list has flaws
    shhhhh, you'll wake the flaming fanboys! You can't say anything bad about Ryzen here :ROFLMAO:
    Reply
  • Unolocogringo
    NightLight said:
    shhhhh, you'll wake the flaming fanboys! You can't say anything bad about Ryzen here :ROFLMAO:
    That is his plan don't mess it up !
    Reply
  • 10tacle
    Amdlova said:
    Amd ever a nightmare with compatability. Remember the first ryzen. Lol I have to purchase four kits to make the system stable. Even the motherboard list has flaws

    And there's a reason G.SKILL and Corsair have "AMD ready" referenced memory kit SKUs. That dates back to first Ryzen generation where memory would not run at full rated speed with XMP enabled - and that was if you were lucky enough to get it to even post.
    Reply
  • motocros1
    im still on 8gb of memory and a 1070ti. think ill wait until 200gb ram is normal
    Reply
  • Firestone
    I will let others test drive these new RAM modules with various Ryzen configurations but I fully intend to build a Ryzen 7950X + 96GB mITX rig once the dust settles.
    Reply
  • cartman-2000
    PlaneInTheSky said:
    32GB RAM is already becoming a minimum for new gaming PC.

    Consoles have 16GB shared VRAM, and the amount of data these consoles can copy from the SSD directly into VRAM in milliseconds is crazy.

    The only way PC are able to keep up with consoles is with large pools of RAM. Many games are now recommending 32GB RAM.
    Nowadays its best to have over 32gb of ram, for a new system.
    For 32gb of ram, the system tends to use around half of it for file cache. There's been games that I've played that have done a bit of paging, with 32gb of system ram.

    For my next build I'd probably go with 64 gb instead of trying to using a 48gb kit, for compatibilitys sake(and better options currently for speed and timings.).
    Reply
  • Firestone
    Honestly, if you're not maxing out the memory on your motherboard, you're just wasting your time. Why even bother building a computer if you're never gonna activate it's full potential. Just get a Steam deck instead.
    Reply