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Arc A750 Trades Blows With RTX 3060 Across Nearly 50 Games

Arc A750
Arc A750 (Image credit: Intel)

In a new video (opens in new tab) on its YouTube channel, Intel has shared fresh benchmarks of the chipmaker's upcoming Arc A750 Limited Edition graphics card. According to Intel's 1080p and 1440p results, the Arc A750's performance is on the same level as Nvidia's GeForce RTX 3060, one of the best graphics cards.

The cumulative results claim that the Arc A750 delivered up to 3% higher performance than the GeForce RTX 3060 at 1080p and up to 5% in 1440p across 43 DirectX 12 titles. The Arc A750 performed slightly faster than the GeForce RTX 3060 in games that use the Vulkan API as well. Intel recorded up to a 4% performance delta at 1080p and 5% in 1440p in favor of the Arc A750.

Intel hasn't officially revealed the specifications for the Arc A750. However, the graphics card will likely come with 24 Xe cores, 3,072 shaders, and 12GB of GDDR6 memory across a 192-bit interface. In addition, the boost clock speed probably hovers around the 2,300 MHz mark. Meanwhile, Intel used EVGA's GeForce RTX 3060 XC Gaming for comparison, one of the faster custom GeForce RTX 3060 on the market, flaunting a 1,882 MHz boost clock.

Intel benchmarked the Arc A750 and GeForce RTX 3060 identical systems powered by the Core i9-12900K, the current Alder Lake flagship. The testbeds also had 32GB of (2x16GB) Corsair Dominator Platinum RGB DDR5-5200 C38 downlocked to 4,800 MHz memory, MP600 Pro XT 4TB SSD. Intel used Windows 11 and the balance power plan for the tests.

One thing to note is that the Arc A750 was on Intel's engineering driver, whereas the GeForce RTX 3060 used the GeForce 516.59 WHQL driver. Arc Alchemist's drivers are still a work in process, so that could be holding the Arc A750 back in the gaming benchmarks. Intel has admitted that Arc underperforms in older APIs, so the company only used DirectX 12 and Vulkan titles.

Intel still has a lot of time to get its driver act together. The company hasn't committed to a specific timeframe for desktop Arc Alchemist's launch. However, the chipmaker stated in a recent blog post (opens in new tab), "Intel Arc GPUs are scheduled for release later this year."

Zhiye Liu
RAM Reviewer and News Editor

Zhiye Liu is a Freelance News Writer at Tom’s Hardware US. Although he loves everything that’s hardware, he has a soft spot for CPUs, GPUs, and RAM.

  • tommo1982
    I'm not enthusiastic about Arc. Recent news are not good. I hope Intel will offer GPU's that can rival with AMD and Nvidia. It'd be good for all of us.
    Reply
  • Nikolay Mihaylov
    tommo1982 said:
    I'm not enthusiastic about Arc. Recent news are not good. I hope Intel will offer GPU's that can rival with AMD and Nvidia. It'd be good for all of us.
    I am very enthusiastic about Arc. If you don't like it, you don't have to buy it. What will matter the most is the price-performance ratio. Obviously, as e newcomer with shoddy drivers Intel will not be able to demand Nvidia's or AMD's prices. They will have to undercut them. And the drivers will get better. So they will provide much needed competition in some segments. They can also offer some more fringe benefits like seamless PCIe passthrough or even SR-IOV. Sure, these are not widely used but also will not cost much to implement, since they need them for the server market. It's a bit like what AMD did with Zen. No artificiall feature segmentation - all Zen CPUs have the same features, they just differ in number of cores and frequences.

    All that is needed is explicit commitment from Intel for long term presence in the GPU market. I would even argue that not having proper GPU line puts them at a disadvantage in the long term. I was very unhappy when AMD acquired ATI but it has paid off. Hopefully, Intel realize that and will improve their execution to provide worthy competition that we all benefit from. They missed a huge opportunity the last couple of years but this game plays out in decades..
    Reply
  • KyaraM
    If they now could just pull their stuff together and get the drivers into a working condition... and release the cards, of course.

    If they now could just pull their stuff together and get the drivers into a working condition... and release the cards, of course.
    Nikolay Mihaylov said:
    I am very enthusiastic about Arc. If you don't like it, you don't have to buy it. What will matter the most is the price-performance ratio. Obviously, as e newcomer with shoddy drivers Intel will not be able to demand Nvidia's or AMD's prices. They will have to undercut them. And the drivers will get better. So they will provide much needed competition in some segments. They can also offer some more fringe benefits like seamless PCIe passthrough or even SR-IOV. Sure, these are not widely used but also will not cost much to implement, since they need them for the server market. It's a bit like what AMD did with Zen. No artificiall feature segmentation - all Zen CPUs have the same features, they just differ in number of cores and frequences. All that is needed is explicit commitment from Intel for long term presence in the GPU market. I would even argue that not having proper GPU line puts them at a disadvantage in the long term. I was very unhappy when AMD acquired ATI but it has paid off. Hopefully, Intel realize that and will improve their execution to provide worthy competition that we all benefit from. They missed a huge opportunity the last couple of years but this game plays out in decades..

    Yeah, we will really have to see. However, they already announced that they would sell them according to tier 3 game performance, so games that are running on older APUs and perform not so great on their cards. We will see. Hopefully soon.
    Reply
  • Soul_keeper
    As a linux user Arc is very promising. I kinda wish I had not bought a radeon (for an insane price), and held out for arc.
    Even if it's slower, it would likely still be plenty fast for anything I do and the drivers will mature with time. The price point seems competitive with these initial products. Plus it's something new/exciting.
    Reply
  • watzupken
    I feel ARC is an exciting entry in the GPU space. However, I feel the first gen ARC got delayed too much that whatever excitement it was meant to deliver, basically is fizzling out in face of next gen GPUs from AMD and Nvidia. Its clear that 2 things are a hurdle to them, (1) timing, and, (2) driver/ software support, both of which Intel failed to deliver.
    Reply
  • hotaru251
    Nikolay Mihaylov said:
    What will matter the most is the price-performance ratio.
    until you need to play a dx11 game and are SOL cause ur performance just got tanked.

    price and performance pale in comparison to support.

    and again reviews of them are not exactly confidence inspiring....especially with a guy at head of company who is known to happily delete products that are too much work for not enough payout.

    If u drop $ on an arc gpu and find out they wont support it in few yrs that would suck. worse if they dont fix issues with it within that time frame.


    I want Intel to succeed (as means betetr prices for end users via competition) but its intel...basically google on trashing stuff that doesnt make em enough $. (and issues with board partners doesnt make it look any better)
    Reply
  • javiindo
    What's the point to show benchmarks a graphic card that it's not yet in the market and we don't know the price? If they put out this graphics card in December. All these number will be pointless because the market will be different.
    I just want the release date and the price. Then the experts will say what it's worth.
    Reply
  • TheJoker2020
    "Intel Benchmarked"...

    Lets leave this here.!!!

    3rd party reviews will show the truth.!
    Reply
  • InvalidError
    So, Intel allegedly performs on-par with the RTX3060 in "first tier" games. What I'd be most curious about is how Intel performs in its "third tier" games its pricing is supposed to be based on.

    I'd like to get a $200 RTX3050, though a $200 A750 could be nice too.
    Reply
  • LolaGT
    They aren't trading blows with anyone since there are none on the market.

    And the drivers will get better.
    They never have before.
    The months delays are because they can't even put together a base reference driver good enough to meet the minimum.(meaning it won't crash)
    Reply