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Cryorig Shows Off Hybrid Water Coolers And IoT PSUs At Computex

Last year, we gave Cryorig a "Best Startup" Best of Computex award, because for a starter company it had already created a fairly impressive assortment of products in its first year before attending the Taipei-based trade show. We haven't visited the company this year yet, but its latest hardware shows that Cryorig hasn't stopped innovating. This year at Computex Cryorig is introducing a new series of Internet of Things power supplies, as well as the A-series of hybrid liquid coolers.

We've seen hybrid liquid coolers for graphics cards, which are basically coolers that are able to cool the GPU with air, but also have a water block built-in. That's not the only type though, as some hybrid graphics cards have a liquid loop that cools the GPU and a fan that handles cooling for the surrounding area, including the VRM circuitry and memory. Cryorig's A-Series of hybrid liquid coolers more closely resemble the latter kind, where a liquid loop cools the CPU, but there is a fan to take care of the surrounding area.

Of course, the surrounding area is not built onto the CPU, but is the motherboard. A major disadvantage of all-in-one liquid coolers is that they do not provide all that much airflow over the heat-generating areas of a motherboard, leaving those parts to warm up more than they should, according to Cryorig. Of course, if you've got good case airflow or placed your radiator fans strategically, this may not be an issue, but if you're sporting a low-airflow system because it is more silent, board heat may be a problem.

For that exact reason, Cryorig equipped the top of the water pump of its hybrid liquid coolers with a fan. The fan in question is a 70 mm fan that can spin at speeds of up to 3000 RPM, and is PWM controlled.

Cryorig built three such coolers. The A40 and A40 Ultimate both have a 240 mm radiator, but the Ultimate variant has a thicker 38 mm radiator rather than a 25 mm thick radiator. They both have 120 mm fans that spin at up to 2200 RPM with PWM control. The A80 features a 280 mm design, is 25 mm thick, and comes with two 1850 RPM PWM fans.

In addition to the intriguing liquid coolers, Cryorig is also taking a step out of cooling with its new Cryorig Pi PSUs. These power supplies are so-called "Internet of Things" PSUs, meaning they are connected to the Web and can be controlled remotely. The idea behind these PSUs is to overcome the difficulty of configuring and maintaining a wake-on-LAN setup, and solves it by integrating a wireless adapter into the PSU, and then letting the PSU power your system on and off from sleep mode, or even from full shutdown. The PSU does this by directly accessing the motherboard's power button leads. You can then control your system's on-ness through an app on your phone.

Cryorig intends to build the Pi PSUs with power envelopes ranging from 600 W to about 1000 W, with efficiency labels between, and including 80-Plus Gold and 80-Plus Platinum.

Availability for the A-Series hybrid liquid coolers is slated for summer 2015, and the Pi power supplies should be arriving sometime in 2016. Cryorig did not reveal pricing information for any of the products.

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  • jimmysmitty
    Interesting concept but I have a very hard time believing that that small fan has that much of an effect, to even cool the GPU.
    Reply
  • Caanis Lupus
    I think it would defeat the purpose of having "silent" or "quiet" setup and have the little fan running anywhere near 3000 rpm.

    The XT140 fans they have are interesting.
    Reply
  • RedJaron
    15976290 said:
    Interesting concept but I have a very hard time believing that that small fan has that much of an effect, to even cool the GPU.
    Same. That graphic seems a little doctored. That said, proper airflow over the RAM and especially the VRM circuitry is essential. A low rpm 120mm or 140mm fan right on the waterblock could be very nice.
    Reply
  • kcarbotte
    I think it would defeat the purpose of having "silent" or "quiet" setup and have the little fan running anywhere near 3000 rpm.

    The XT140 fans they have are interesting.

    most water pumps are far from silent. Closed loop coolers shouldn't be considered a quieter solution than air coolers. Thier main benefit is the ability to route the heat right out the vents of the case, rather than into the atmosphere letting the exhaust fans handle the ambient heat.
    Reply
  • PaulBags
    I look foreward to the reviews when they're released. I want that function in a PSU, it remains to be seen how loud that fan is and it's spec (prefer fanless), and unfortunatly gold will probably be at the lower watts whereas I want at least platnum.

    I'm probably never going to move to liquid cooling, but I look foreward to seeming toms thermals for the a series closed loops.
    Reply
  • UsVersusThem
    I absolutely love my Cryorig h7, so I'm curious how these turn out. If it's well, might consider either. Although might wait til second generation on the psu.
    Reply
  • SamSerious
    That thing would be great to cool my FX-9370 while also taking care of the VRM of my hot ASrock 990fx Killer.
    A liquid cooler would be nice for transporting the computer without stressing the board with a heavy cooler too much, but without a hybrid solution the VRMs would get way too hot..
    Reply