Skip to main content

G.Skill Reveals 'Ripjaws' PSUs, Trident Z Memory

This week during Computex 2015, G.Skill expanded its line of "Ripjaws" PC components with the launch of four new PSUs. There are four models in all, two of which are 80 PLUS Gold certified, and two that are 80 PLUS Platinum certified. These units range from 750 watts to 1250 watts, ideal for system builders who are looking to beef up their workstations or gaming PCs.

Included in the 80 PLUS Gold group are the PS750G and the PS850G power supplies, providing 750 watts and 850 watts, respectively, along with a 90 percent efficiency rating. The 80 PLUS Platinum group includes the PS850P (850 watts) and the PS1250P (1250 watts) that have a 92 percent efficiency rating. All four sport a modular design to help reduce not only the cable clutter but the system temperature as well.

"All Ripjaws series PSUs are made from the highest-quality materials possible, such as 100 percent Japanese-made capacitors, for higher reliability and longer lasting lifetime," the company's press release explained. "A unique automated G.Skill ECO Optimized (GEO) Thermal Fan Control also provides zero fan noise during low load operations. And when it does get warm, the durable double ball bearing 140 mm fan cools your PC system quietly and efficiently."

In addition to the PSUs, G.Skill is also showcasing its new Trident Z series of DDR4 memory sticks. Available in quad-channel and dual-channel configurations, these memory chips include aluminum heat spreaders (shown above) that can be customized to match the desktop's color scheme.

Unfortunately, G.Skill did not provide any additional details such as the timings, voltage and capacities. However, the company will undoubtedly launch DDR4 kits to compete with the latest solutions from Patriot, Corsair and Kingston. According to the company, detailed specifications will be released soon, although G.Skill expects to launch the Trident Z chips next month.

News of the Trident Z series arrives after the company revealed its fastest DDR4 memory back in May. The kit was based on the Ripjaws 4 and Samsung's 4 Gb ICs, clocking in at 3666 MHz. The kit came packed with four 4 GB DIMMs that were timed at 18-18-18-38 and running at 1.35 volts. The kit, offering 16 GB of RAM, is supported on most X99 motherboards.

As for the Ripjaws power supplies, G.Skill did not provide pricing or availability, so stay tuned for that information as well.

Follow Kevin Parrish @exfileme. Follow us @tomshardware, on Facebook and on Google+.

  • Onus
    Who is the OEM on the PSUs?
    It seems to me with PC parts needing less juice, these are likely to be overkill for all but the tiny percentage of people running multiple high-end graphics cards.
    Considering the lower power needed by cards like the GTX970, combined with Broadwell's power usage numbers, the 300W-400W PSU should again be viable for even relatively high-end PCs.
    Reply
  • dstarr3
    An article about a new PSU brand is pretty useless if you don't name the OEM.
    Reply
  • RedJaron
    +3, who's the PSU OEM?
    Reply
  • Frozen Fractal
    THAT RAM!!!! OH MY GOD!!!! SO BEAUTIFUL!!!!
    Reply
  • racecar56
    Who is the OEM on the PSUs?
    It seems to me with PC parts needing less juice, these are likely to be overkill for all but the tiny percentage of people running multiple high-end graphics cards.
    Considering the lower power needed by cards like the GTX970, combined with Broadwell's power usage numbers, the 300W-400W PSU should again be viable for even relatively high-end PCs.
    Yeah, I was wondering why they weren't offering anything lower than 750W. I've got an i7-4790K and a GTX 960 on a 450W PSU, so, c'mon, can't they at least make a 600W?
    Reply
  • JackNaylorPE
    There's probably 100 manufacturers....er "vendors" selling < 600 watts. A new company wanting to get noticed will enter in the mainstream enthusiast market where they will generate the most press / buzz.

    Nice to see someone emulating Avexir memory styles, the ability to swap colors is a nice touch assuming but doesn't require follow up purchases.
    Reply
  • RedJaron
    15979337 said:
    There's probably 100 manufacturers....er "vendors" selling < 600 watts. A new company wanting to get noticed will enter in the mainstream enthusiast market where they will generate the most press / buzz.
    They may get buzz at this capacity, but I'd consider the mainstream enthusiast section between 450W - 650W right now. That range can safely and reliably run the vast majority of machines, even LGA 2011 or twin GPUs provided your PSU has the right cables. You only need to go above 700W if you're really pushing overclocks with two GPUs or using 3+ GPUs.
    Reply
  • blackdenoir
    CWT
    Reply
  • JackNaylorPE
    15980360 said:
    mainstream enthusiast section between 450W - 650W right now. That range can safely and reliably run the vast majority of machines, even LGA 2011 or twin GPUs provided your PSU has the right cables. You only need to go above 700W if you're really pushing overclocks with two GPUs or using 3+ GPUs.

    No argument there..... same thing can be said about nVidia's 960 or 970 series. But which one gets released first and which one is the one the websites wanna get their hands on. Also for whatever reason, there are an extremely small number of highly rated (jonnyguru 10 build quality / 10 performance) PSUs in the lower size ranges (see below). Vendors wanting too put their best foot forward because high ratings create the customer mindset.

    Th best historical example is the IBM A20 series laptops. Every year the PC magazines had the IBM A20 on the cover and it sat at the top of every ranking. However, because of the cost, it had very few sales. However, "winning the title" created a consumer mindset that had everyone buying lower priced IBM laptops because "they were the best" even tho those lesser priced models were no where near the A20 in the performance category. Then one day some bean counter decided to drop the A20 line because low sales numbers versus cost was not that favorable as compared to the mass sales lower priced lines. IBM stopped making the magazine covers and within 2 years IBM ceased to exist as a brand name.

    jonnyguru ratings

    EVGA GS 650 - 8.5 performance / 9.5 build quality
    EVGA GS 850 - 10.0 performance / 9.5 build quality
    EVGA GS 1050 - 10.0 performance / 10.0 build quality

    So if you are EVGA, knowing that the 1st PSU released in a new line will get the most reviews, which one you wanna put out there 1st ?

    Look at the 3 bar charys here. 1st is the lowest 1/3, 2nd the middle tier and 3rd the highest

    http://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/LEPA/P1700-MA/9.html

    4 of the top 5 are 1600 watt units
    most of the 1st 1/3 are 500 - 650

    Just 2 in the top 1/3 are below 750. One of those is the Seasonic SS-520FL ... great PSU but how many want to pay for that quality at $140 ? The thing is making a PSU bigger doesn't really cost that much. It takes the same amount of labor to make a 520 versus a 1050.... the costs for shipping, packaging, overhead etc are nearly identical. Even the parts cost is small. However, people are more willing to pay more at the bigger wattages ... and not so much at the lower wattages. As a result, it's harder to justify putting the same quality materials and employing the same quality labor skill levels in the lower wattage / lower cost units.
    Reply
  • Nintendork
    I should be better if they also show focus on 300-500w high efficiency PSUs. Unless you run more than 1 gpu with overclock on it and the cpu, there's no need for more than 500w. They could change people behavior towards low wattage PSUs but pretty much all companies focus on the small niche of 800w+ PSUs.
    Reply