Intel Launches 16 New 13th-Gen Raptor Lake Desktop CPUs: Higher Pricing and Power Consumption

Intel Raptor Lake
(Image credit: Intel)

Intel announced 16 new Raptor Lake CPUs spanning its 65W mainstream PC chips and 35W “T-Series” categories today, broadening its roster of 13th-Gen processors that currently dominate our list of Best CPUs for gaming and our CPU benchmark hierarchy. The new chips extend from the Core i3 to high-end Core i9 families and come with more cores and higher frequencies along with higher gen-on-gen pricing, mirroring the price increases we noticed last night with Intel’s 12th-gen chips. They also have significantly increased peak power consumption compared to their predecessors.

In many respects, Raptor Lake is an iteration of the microarchitectures found in the previous-gen Alder Lake chips, but with expansive improvements that yield impressive performance gains. Even though Intel still uses the ‘Intel 7’ process node, it leverages advances in a newer revision of the silicon to push clock speeds higher while improving power efficiency. Intel also etches the cores on a new, larger die with more cores and L3 cache and exposes previously unused L2 cache. These enhancements have given Raptor Lake a tangible performance lead over AMD’s competing Ryzen 7000 chips.

Most of Intel’s new 13th-gen processors announced today come with the same Raptor Cove architecture as the flagship models that launched last year, but some of the Core i5 and the lone Core i3 model reportedly come with the same die and architecture used for the 12th-Gen Alder Lake CPUs, albeit bulked up with more generous core counts and/or higher clock rates to enable higher levels of performance.

As we saw with the launch of the unlocked full-power K-series chips last year, Intel has also significantly dialed up its peak power consumption to keep the performance edge over AMD’s competing Ryzen 7000 processors. So, while Intel’s new chips slot into the traditional 35W and 65W envelopes that the company uses for its budget-geared lineup, they consume more power and will generate more heat than their predecessors.

New B760 motherboards will accompany the 65W Raptor Lake chips to market, but they don’t bring many meaningful improvements over the prior-gen B660 lineup. Raptor Lake still maintains backward compatibility with existing 600-series motherboards, providing a value path that will mesh well with the lower-end processors (make sure you have the right BIOS). 

Intel has also preserved support for DDR4 memory, a key cost-saving measure that gives the company a big advantage over AMD’s pricey DDR5-only platforms, while also offering support for DDR5 memory. However, Intel has dropped peak DDR5 speeds down a notch on its lower-end models.

Intel 13th-Gen 65W Raptor Lake Specifications and Pricing

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AMD Ryzen 7000 Zen 4 vs Intel 13th-Gen Raptor Lake
Row 0 - Cell 0 Street/MSRPCores / Threads (P+E)P-Core Base / Boost Clock (GHz)E-Core Base / Boost Clock (GHz)Cache (L2/L3)TDP / PBP / MTPMemory
Core i9-13900K / KF$589 (K) - $564 (KF)24 / 32 (8+16)3.0 / 5.82.2 / 4.368MB (32+36)125W / 253WDDR4-3200 / DDR5-5600
Core i9-13900 / F$549 - $529 (F)24 / 32 (8+16)2.0 / 5.61.5 / 4.268MB (32+36)65W / 219WDDR4-3200 / DDR5-5600
Ryzen 9 7950X$569 ($699)16 / 324.5 / 5.7-80MB (16+64)170W / 230WDDR5-5200
Ryzen 9 7900X$474 ($549)12 / 244.7 / 5.6-76MB (12+64)170W / 230WDDR5-5200
Core i7-13700K / KF$409 (K) - $384 (KF)16 / 24 (8+8) 3.4 / 5.42.5 / 4.254MB (24+30)125W / 253WDDR4-3200 / DDR5-5600
Core i7-13700 / F$384 - $359 (F)16 / 24 (8+8)2.1 / 5.21.5 / 4.154MB (24+30)65W / 219WDDR4-3200 / DDR5-5600
Ryzen 7 7700X$349 ($399)8 / 164.5 / 5.4-40MB (8+32)105W / 142WDDR5-5200

Here we can see the breakdown for the highest-end Core i9-13900 and Core i7-13700 models that come with the new Raptor Lake die. As you can see, the new ‘non-K’ chips come with the same core counts as their full-fledged counterparts but have significantly lower clock speeds (particularly for base frequencies) that allow Intel to squeeze them into a lower 65W Processor Base Power (PBP) envelope. These two models also have a 219W peak power (Maximum Turbo Power – MTP), representing a 17W gen-on-gen increase for Core i9 and a 37W increase for Core i7.

Prices have also increased by 10% over the debut pricing of the previous-gen chips. As a result, you’ll pay $54 more for the Core i9 and $49 more for the Core i7 model. As before, you can opt for the graphics-less F-series models to save some cash.

All 65W chips aren’t ‘officially’ overclockable, but bear in mind that some motherboard vendors have developed workarounds that allow full overclocking on these models. Intel has turned a blind eye to the unsanctioned practice, and these motherboards tend to only carry a small premium.

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AMD Ryzen 7000 Zen 4 vs Intel 13th-Gen Raptor Lake
Row 0 - Cell 0 Street/MSRPCores / Threads (P+E)P-Core Base / Boost Clock (GHz)E-Core Base / Boost Clock (GHz)Cache (L2/L3)TDP / PBP / MTPMemory
Ryzen 5 7600X$249 ($299)6 / 124.7 / 5.3-38MB (6+32)105W / 142WDDR5-5200
Core i5-13600K / KF$319 (K) - $294 (KF)14 / 20 (6+8)3.5 / 5.12.6 / 3.944MB (20+24)125W / 181WDDR4-3200 / DDR5-5600
Core i5-13600$25514 / 20 (6+8)2.7 / 5.02.0 / 3.735.5MB (11.5+24)65W /154WDDR4-3200 / DDR5-4800
Core i5-12600$2556 / 12 (6+0)3.3 / 4.8-15.5MB (7.5+18)65W / 117WDDR4-3200 / DDR5-4800
Core i5-13500$23214 / 20 (6+8)2.5 / 4.81.8 / 3.555.5MB (11.5+24)65W /148WDDR4-3200 / DDR5-4800
Core i5-13400 / F$221 - $196 (F)10 / 16 (6+4)2.5 / 4.61.8 / 3.329.5MB (9.5+20)65W /148WDDR4-3200 / DDR5-4800
Core i5-12400 / F$199 - $167 (F) 6 / 12 (6+0)4.4 / 2.5-25.5MB (7.5+18)65W / 117WDDR4-3200 / DDR5-4800
Core i3-13100 (F)$134 - $139 (F)4 / 8 (4+0)3.4 / 4.5-17MB (5+12)60W / 89WDDR4-3200 / DDR5-4800
Core i3-12100 / F$122 - $129 | $97 - $1044 / 8 (4+0)3.3 / 4.3-17MB (5+12)60W / 89WDDR4-3200 / DDR5-4800

The lower end of the 65W product stack reportedly has multiple SKUs that leverage Alder Lake silicon, but Intel hasn’t officially confirmed which SKUs ship with the older design (we’ll update when we get a response).

The Core i5 and i3 models all have a peak memory speed of DDR5-4800, lower than the DDR5-5600 supported by the pricier variants, and the same cache-per-core configurations as Alder Lake. This means the chips don’t carry the improvements we see in Raptor Lake, all but confirming that some of these models (if not all) use the Alder Lake die.

Intel has offset that by bulking up the entire non-K Core i5 lineup with E-Cores, a first, which will significantly improve performance in threaded workloads while also offloading the P-Cores for more important tasks. Paired with the higher gen-on-gen clock speeds, these models will deliver a big performance boost over the prior-gen models and provide stiff competition for AMD’s soon-to-be-launched 65W Ryzen 7000 CPUs. Additionally, it is noteworthy that Intel has exposed more performance with Raptor Lake by upgrading the firmware of the integrated microcontroller that debuted with Alder Lake. As such, some of these types of changes to the Alder Lake tuning might be employed in these lower-end models.

We see even bigger peak power increases of 37W for the Core i5-13600 and 31W for the 13500 and 13400. Meanwhile, power remains the same on the Core i3-13100, but this chip is nearly identical to its predecessor, with the same number of cores and a mere 200 MHz increase in peak frequency.

Again, we see the 10% price increase compared to the debut pricing of the previous-gen models, which is a particular disappointment in these cost-sensitive price ranges.

Intel 13th-Gen Raptor Lake Benchmarks

Intel made a few performance projections, but as with all vendor-provided benchmarks, you should take them with a grain of salt. Intel claims an 11% improvement in single-threaded and 34% improvement in multi-threaded workloads, which seems reasonable given the increased cores, frequencies, and power envelopes of the models in question. We’ll put this to the test soon.

Intel 13th-Gen Raptor Lake T-Series 35W Specifications and Pricing

Finally, here you can see the 35W T-series lineup. These chips are functionally the same as their counterparts above but come with a much lower power envelope to tailor them for specific segments, like fanless PCs, small form-factor rigs, HTPCs, and the like. The Core i9 model retains the same peak of 106W, but the Core i5-13600T and 13500T models come with an 18W increase in power, while the 13700T and 13400T see an 8W increase in peak power.

We’re still digging for a few details about the chips, which we’ll add as we receive answers. Intel says these chips will be on shelves globally today. Look to these pages for reviews soon.

Paul Alcorn
Deputy Managing Editor

Paul Alcorn is the Deputy Managing Editor for Tom's Hardware US. He writes news and reviews on CPUs, storage and enterprise hardware.

  • DRagor
    13500 costing just 10 bucks more then 13400 but having 4 extra e-cores plus higher clocks and more cache looks really yummy. Can't wait to see reviews.
    Reply
  • cyrusfox
    This is the first time I have realized the 12600 had no e-cores while the 12600k does. The low end got quite a bump with all the added efficiency cores, only i3 missing out now.

    More cache, higher base+turbo, and in most instances more # e-cores. Tough competing with last gen prices (Ryzen 5500 $90 at microcenter and other places going for $100), good to see these chips already available at newegg (13500 already OOS).
    Reply
  • -Fran-
    Thanks for the information, Paul!

    There's a small typo in the specs table:

    Core i5-13500$23214 / 20 (6+8)2.5 / 4.81.8 / 3.555.5MB (11.5+24)65W /148WDDR4-3200 / DDR5-4800
    I wish that i5 had that much cache! Can you imagine? xD

    Regards.
    Reply
  • Why_Me
    The only downside is the locked i5's natively support DDR5 4800mhz when the i7's natively support DDR5 5600mhz.
    Reply
  • truerock
    I've become more interested in the Intel Xeon CPUs that Intel will roll out in 2023.

    I continue to think that E-cores are a dumb idea for desktop PCs.
    Apparently, Intel thinks E-cores are a dumb idea for HEDT PCs.

    I think the Intel Raptor desktop CPUs are a riff on the Intel Raptor notebook CPUs - as a way to capture additional income from the Intel notebook CPUs - even if it is weird to have E-cores in a desktop PC.
    Reply
  • thestryker
    Based on the Intel tables none of these parts other than the 13900/13700 are Raptor Cove cores which I find disappointing despite expecting it. I was holding out hope that the 13600/13500 might be Raptor Cove due to sharing P/E configuration with the 13600K. While there were all sorts of optimizations the memory controller is the biggest where Raptor Cove is a huge improvement over Golden Cove.
    Reply
  • cyrusfox
    thestryker said:
    Based on the Intel tables none of these parts other than the 13900/13700 are Raptor Cove cores
    Hmm, it seems you are right, I thought everything was going to get a cache increase... but looking at identical core configs, I am not seeing that, 12600k and 13400 identical core count and cache...Would be interested in an article breaking this down. I'm looking at the top end but always curious how the whole stack of offerings looks(on a 12900k & 12600k eager to replace)
    Reply
  • thestryker
    truerock said:
    I continue to think that E-cores are a dumb idea for desktop PCs.
    Apparently, Intel thinks E-cores are a dumb idea for HEDT PCs.
    Intel can't afford to have any scheduler issues, AVX 512 is more important, and power consumption/maximum clocks are less important to this market. These are the reasons you won't see hybrid CPUs in this area, but Intel is bringing all E-core high core count CPUs in the next two years.

    truerock said:
    I think the Intel Raptor desktop CPUs are a riff on the Intel Raptor notebook CPUs - as a way to capture additional income from the Intel notebook CPUs - even if it is weird to have E-cores in a desktop PC.

    No E-cores are twofold: keep parity with AMD without completely jacking up power consumption and it's also likely cheaper to manufacture than 16 P-cores would be. The only potential overlap between the two markets is the HX CPUs and these seem to come down to binning desktop parts rather than the other way around (at least they did with ADL).

    cyrusfox said:
    Hmm, it seems you are right, I thought everything was going to get a cache increase... but looking at identical core configs, I am not seeing that, 12600k and 13400 identical core count and cache...Would be interested in an article breaking this down. I'm looking at the top end but always curious how the whole stack of offerings looks(on a 12900k & 12600k eager to replace)
    The easiest way to tell is the L2 cache because Raptor Cove is 2MB P-core and Golden Cove is 1.25MB, both share 2MB/4 E-core design.
    Reply
  • AgentBirdnest
    Apologies if I missed it, but when will these be available?

    I was already interested in the 13400, but now I'm even more curious about the 13500. Can't wait for reviews of those! I'll likely put one in a new build.
    Reply
  • Why_Me
    AgentBirdnest said:
    Apologies if I missed it, but when will these be available?

    I was already interested in the 13400, but now I'm even more curious about the 13500. Can't wait for reviews of those! I'll likely put one in a new build.
    https://www.newegg.com/intel-core-i5-13400f-core-i5-13th-gen/p/N82E16819118431Intel Core i5-13400F $209.99

    https://www.newegg.com/intel-core-i5-13400-core-i5-13th-gen/p/N82E16819118430Intel Core i5-13400 $239.99
    Reply