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Lian-Li Launches Windowed PC-Q10WX: A Tiny Case To Show Off Your Hardware

Lian Li has announced the PC-Q10WX Mini-ITX chassis. The company said the new case is designed to house a number of larger components despite its compact size. The entire left side of the case is a window to show off all of the installed hardware.

The case measures 207 mm wide, 277 mm tall and has a depth of 335 mm. Inside this tiny space, Lian Li managed to make room for ATX power supplies as long as 150 mm, and graphics cards as long as 270 mm. The company even managed to accommodate CPU coolers as tall as 140 mm. The case is also able to accommodate a 240 mm radiator on the top, and a second 120 mm radiator on the rear of the case, making it possible to have a fairly robust water cooling system installed.

To manage this feat, Lian Li used some creative thinking in the placement of components. The power supply is housed in the front of the case, in a vertical position with the cables hanging at the bottom. There is a power extension inside the case leading to a jack on the rear. Hard drives are installed below the graphics card at the bottom of the case. There is space for two 3.5-inch drives, or three 2.5-inch drives. If a full-size drive is installed, only one more drive can be added at the bottom, regardless of size. A slot-load DVD drive can be installed vertically, directly in front of the power supply. A 3.5-inch or 2.5-inch drive can be installed in this space if an optical drive is not needed.

On the front of the aluminum constructed case, near the bottom, Lian Li has included two USB 3.0 ports, a pair of audio jacks for headphones and microphone, and an aluminum power button. The bottom of the case has four aluminum pegs with rubberized feet to keep the case off the ground. The only part of the case that isn't aluminum is the left-hand side, which is made of glass and held on with four screws.

Lian Li said the PC-Q10WX will go on sale within September for a suggested price of $119.99.

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  • Onus
    No reset button? That would be a dealbreaker IMHO.
    Reply
  • Quixit
    No reset button? That would be a dealbreaker IMHO.

    When was the last time you really used a reset button?
    Reply
  • Onus
    I believe my last use of a reset button was last week. I'm not a madd overclocker, but I do make enough adjustments that having a reset button saves time and aggravation, and is a little gentler on components than power-cycling. It is also helpful when recovering from some driver crashes.
    Reply
  • soccerplayer88
    Why would you need a reset button? To accidentally bump and lose/corrupt data? Hold the power button for 3 seconds. Done.

    OT: Looks like a great case. If I can squeeze my spare GTX 980 into it (267mm) I may have found my performance LAN case.
    Reply
  • McWhiskey
    The press release and marketing is a bit misleading. The 240mm radiator HAS to be mounted on the outside of the case.
    Reply
  • Onus
    I don't want to power-cycle. While this may not seem like a big deal, there are too many decent cases that have reset buttons (including many Lian Li), that I am not going to consider this one for a personal build. It would probably be fine for business builds, but they don't typically need windows.
    Reply
  • atheus
    The case measures 207 mm wide, 277 mm tall and has a depth of 335 mm.
    So even though I know an inch is about 25mm, whenever I read an article that describes the overall size of something that isn't a case fan using millimeters I wind up reading past the dimensions without gaining any understanding of its actual size. I have to go back and convert it to inches in my head if I ever decide to really grasp its actual size. Perhaps a younger generation of Americans have been taught to think in metric, but I doubt it. FWIW, this isn't tomshardware.co.uk, so while I don't mind that fans and PSU's are measured in millimeters, when it comes to figuring out how big a case is, I'd much prefer inches (or at least put them in parentheses so swarms of idiots like myself don't all have to do the conversion separately).
    Reply
  • McWhiskey
    The case measures 207 mm wide, 277 mm tall and has a depth of 335 mm.
    So even though I know an inch is about 25mm, whenever I read an article that describes the overall size of something that isn't a case fan using millimeters I wind up reading past the dimensions without gaining any understanding of its actual size. I have to go back and convert it to inches in my head if I ever decide to really grasp its actual size. Perhaps a younger generation of Americans have been taught to think in metric, but I doubt it. FWIW, this isn't tomshardware.co.uk, so while I don't mind that fans and PSU's are measured in millimeters, when it comes to figuring out how big a case is, I'd much prefer inches (or at least put them in parentheses so swarms of idiots like myself don't all have to do the conversion separately).
    I read halfway through your comment and said to myself, "What an idiot. You can just do a conversion." Then I read the rest of your comment... foot in mouth. I'll quietly take my place by your side.
    Reply
  • atheus
    16672991 said:
    I read halfway through your comment and said to myself, "What an idiot. You can just do a conversion." Then I read the rest of your comment... foot in mouth. I'll quietly take my place by your side.
    This made me laugh, thanks haha.
    Reply
  • TechyInAZ
    No reset button? That would be a dealbreaker IMHO.

    When was the last time you really used a reset button?

    Yeah really. I personally haven't used it at all in say 6 months or more.
    Reply