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InWin, EKWB Collaborate for $1,500 Limited Edition PC Case

(Image credit: EKWB)

If you're in the market for a really special PC chassis, look no further. InWin and EKWB have teamed up to tempt you with a liquid cooling-ready PC case that makes you want to drop everything and build. The only problem is that with its nearly $2,000 price tag, most will actually need to put in extra hours at the job in order to afford the Limited Edition InWin 909EK . 

The case is a twist on the InWin 909 that came out in 2015. It's supposed to make an even better chassis for liquid cooling, and where the 909 has a huge tempered glass panel on one side and a traditional layout with motherboard placement on the right side, the 909EK features a total redesign. 

The 909EK places the motherboard in an upside-down layout on the case's left side, and a huge portion of the front of the case can facilitate a pair of EKWB's quad-fan 480mm XE radiators, which are 60mm thick. In order to enable this support, the 909EK is wider than the 909. 

(Image credit: EKWB)

Perhaps the most controversial change is the removal of the motherboard tray. Instead, running along the left of the chassis is a liquid cooling distribution plate, which brings the fluid to all the access points you need, shortens hard-tubing runs significantly and tidies up the overall look with fewer bends. The distribution plate also acts as the motherboard tray.

Finally, when you're done building your PC, there won't be any tempered glass panels or paneling of any kind to seal the sides -- this is a chassis that remains open for maximum showcasing.

(Image credit: EKWB)

To feed the liquid loop, the chassis can house two D5 pumps, which should offer ample cooling power for most setups when paired with the two radiators measuring 480mm tall and 60mm thick. 

The case also comes with some sticker shock. EKWB lists the case for $1,499.99. If that doesn't put you out of the running for this high-end case, you can pre-order it now for shipment on March 19.

  • bit_user
    Classy. If I ever bought a pre-built PC, I'd want something like that.

    Yeah, I know they're selling just the case, but I'm talking about the system in the first pic:

    Reply
  • bigdragon
    I like what InWin and EKWB have done here. The standard ATX layout is obsolete. Inverted or 90-degree rotated motherboards make far more sense. I've never liked having my graphics card hot-side down.

    I am one of those crazy people that crammed a 3900X into a Silverstone FT03, so I might be just a tiny bit biased!
    Reply
  • g-unit1111
    In Win's custom cases are like works of art, it's always interesting to see what they come up with next.
    Reply
  • g-unit1111
    bigdragon said:
    I like what InWin and EKWB have done here. The standard ATX layout is obsolete. Inverted or 90-degree rotated motherboards make far more sense. I've never liked having my graphics card hot-side down.

    I am one of those crazy people that crammed a 3900X into a Silverstone FT03, so I might be just a tiny bit biased!

    Hey I jammed an XFX Thicc into a RVZ01, that card just barely cleared the edge of the case when I was building it! A micro ATX case is roomy by comparison. :lol:
    Reply
  • bit_user
    bigdragon said:
    I've never liked having my graphics card hot-side down.
    Might that be due to using a bottom-mounted PSU? I'm going on limited data, but it seems to me that they tend to orient the mobo with its power connectors on whatever side is closest to the PSU.

    Anyway, if you use a GPU cooled by axial fans, then it doesn't matter. Unless, your graphics card has a backplate that's doing a useful amount of cooling, in which case you probably do want the back side up!
    Reply