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Nvidia RTX 30-Series Ranks First in Latest Steam Survey

Steam Hardware Survey stylized photo
(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

The monthly Steam Hardware Survey (opens in new tab) provides insight into the current gaming trends, showing which products are gaining steam, if you will, and which are losing it. The statistical methods may be somewhat opaque, but at present, it's the best we have. The month of August 2022 shows some significant milestones in the GPU realm, as well as some noteworthy trends in the CPU and OS areas. Sprinkle with salt as needed, but here's how things now stand.

Nvidia RTX 30-Series Takes the Pole Position

Steam HW Survey GPU Family Percentages, August 2022

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

Starting with the best graphics cards, or at least the most popular options, we've used the data from Steam's API page (opens in new tab) as it's more granular than the main GPU page. We've also normalized the column values based on the total sum, so all columns add up to 100%. (Without that adjustment, the columns sum to anywhere from 90.05% to 92.92%, possibly due to different OSes or other factors that aren't immediately clear.)

There are two big pieces of news. First, the Nvidia RTX 30-series cards have surpassed any other GPU family in total survey share for the first time. All RTX 30-series GPUs combined now account for 21.65% of the August total, up 1.90% compared to July's data. On the flip side, the GTX 10-series dropped 2.15% and now sits at 22.09% — still the second most popular GPU family, though. AMD's RX 6000-series also saw a slight gain of just 0.03%, taking it to 1.84% overall. Every other family of GPUs saw a decrease.

(And before you ask: Yes, you could technically group the RTX 20-series and GTX 16-series under the Turing banner. The problem is that the feature sets are completely different. RTX 20 supports DXR and DLSS, GTX 16 does not, so we consider them as separate families.)

The other big news is that Nvidia's GTX 1060 no longer ranks as the most popular single GPU. Well, technically it still ties for first place at 6.88% of surveyed PCs, but the GTX 1650 has now climbed into the top slot as well — that's not even a GPU we liked, though it's undoubtedly helped by its use in budget gaming laptops. More notably, GTX 1060 dropped by 0.53% compared to July, while GTX 1650 increased by 0.07%.

The single GPU that saw the most significant jump in share over the past month is the RTX 3060, which gained 0.77%. "AMD Radeon Graphics" saw the second largest increase, of 0.44%, and that name likely applies to various integrated graphics solutions — probably including Valve's own Steam Deck. RTX 3050 came in third with a 0.31% gain. However, there's plenty of room for fluctuations, as evidenced by Intel's UHD Graphics 620 ranking fourth with a 0.23% gain in share.

Big Changes in OS Share and CPU Manufacturer

The other two interesting pieces of news come from the OS and CPU pages. Our list of the best CPUs for gaming has been dominated by Intel's Alder Lake offerings since they arrived, though the Ryzen 7 5800X3D also makes an appearance as a pure gaming solution.

Steam's CPU vendor share (opens in new tab) has been holding somewhat steady at around the 67% Intel, 33% AMD mark for a while now, give or take a few percent. This past month, things took a swing in Intel's favor with gains of 1.65% and a commensurate loss of 1.67% for AMD (those are relative percentages rather than absolutes, which is why they're not the same).

How meaningful of a change is that? It's probably more margin of error on sampling, as we've seen AMD gains in May and July, with Intel gains in April, June, and now August. It would make more sense if these figures were skewed toward new PCs, which are more prone to fluctuations than the PC market as a whole, but we'll take it as an interesting piece of data and move on.

Wrapping things up from the OS and API page (opens in new tab), Windows 11 saw another decent bump in overall share, improving to 24.71%. Windows 10 still accounts for the majority of all PCs, however, with 71.76% of surveyed systems. It's also interesting that Windows 7 and Windows 8 saw slight gains over the past month. We doubt that many PCs are actually replacing Windows 10 with Windows 7, so these are likely just variations in sampling, but we can't say for certain.

Looking Forward

(Image credit: Shutterstock)

Over the past several months, there have been numerous reports of lower PC and component sales and inventory bloat. As a result, consumers and businesses aren't buying hardware as fast as it's being produced, and the near-term outlook isn't good. That comes from JPR reports (opens in new tab) and IDC reports (opens in new tab). The result has been falling hardware prices, and retail GPU prices continued to fall.

The situation isn't helped by all the next-generation hardware slated to launch in the coming months. On the GPU side of things, Nvidia RTX 40-series cards are expected to arrive by October, and AMD RX 7000-series RDNA 3 GPUs will likely land in November. Intel's Arc Alchemist GPUs for desktops are also expected in October, with improved drivers relative to the Arc A380.

Things are just as exciting over in CPU and motherboard land. AMD Ryzen 7000 CPUs using the Zen 4 architecture officially launch on September 27, accompanied by 600-series chipsets and motherboards. That will usher in the era of DDR5 memory for both AMD and Intel platforms, though Intel continues to offer DDR4 support as an alternative.

Intel Raptor Lake CPUs should also launch by October (rumor of October 17 launch), adding more efficiency cores across the stack and providing renewed competition for AMD's Zen 4 chips. The 13th Gen Intel CPUs will also have new 700-series chipsets, though they're also socket compatible with LGA1700, and existing 600-series boards should work with a BIOS update.

All of those changes likely won't show up on the Steam Hardware Survey for many months, but come next year, we should see the new hardware start to pop up.

Jarred Walton is a senior editor at Tom's Hardware focusing on everything GPU. He has been working as a tech journalist since 2004, writing for AnandTech, Maximum PC, and PC Gamer. From the first S3 Virge '3D decelerators' to today's GPUs, Jarred keeps up with all the latest graphics trends and is the one to ask about game performance.

  • AgentBirdnest
    Woah! I honestly didn't expect this to happen anytime soon. Not only because of the shortage for the first ~18 months of the 30-series' existence, but just the prices alone. I don't even mean inflated/scalper prices - I mean the MSRPs are ridiculous. There is no more low-end, and the prices of mid-range are what high-end used to be a few years ago.

    It does make sense, with all the price drops over the last couple of months. And I didn't really think about laptop 30-series, which probably makes up a good chunk of that 21.7% (I assume you counted those?)
    Still, I just didn't expect it. Maybe I'm biased with my 20-series. : P In any case, it's interesting to see.
    Reply
  • Gam3r01
    An interesting point to extrapolate from this:
    The vocal minority telling everyone to not buy yet, and keep waiting for lower prices, apparently arent stopping the vast majority from buying 30xx series cards now that they are available. Which likely means prices will bottom out higher than theyd like.
    Reply
  • wifiburger
    damn those new AMD GPU mumbers @ 1.8% :ROFLMAO:

    even with RTX30 crazy prices , Nvidia sells 10 cards for every single AMD 6000 card.
    Reply
  • DaDude1
    Admin said:
    The August Steam Hardware Survey indicates Nvidia's RTX 30-series GPUs are the most popular among gamers now, followed by the GTX 10-series.

    Nvidia RTX 30-Series Ranks First in Latest Steam Survey : Read more

    Jarred,

    I don't know how you got to these numbers, but they are absolutely wrong. When I go to the steam survey and only add AMD RX570 and 580 I get to 4.5 %, but In your table you show for all of AMD 3.9%.
    Reply
  • Tugrul_512bit
    I'm still running GT1030 and its K420 helpers.
    Reply
  • bigdragon
    I'm honestly surprised so many people are willing to accept the higher prices of Nvidia's 30-series. The value proposition just isn't there for me. Maybe my opinion would be different if we had Crysis-like PC exclusives frequently dropping, but we don't.
    Reply
  • JarredWaltonGPU
    DaDude1 said:
    Jarred,

    I don't know how you got to these numbers, but they are absolutely wrong. When I go to the steam survey and only add AMD RX570 and 580 I get to 4.5 %, but In your table you show for all of AMD 3.9%.
    Yeah, sorry. I just fixed them. I had an error in one formula row where it added up the wrong rows. It should have been 5.90% for August, not 0.7%. Still, AMD's RX 580 and RX 570 numbers are much lower than what you used.

    This is the main GPUs page. 1.28% + 1.04% would be 2.32%.134
    I used the API page, under the DirectX 12 API. There's a 0.01% difference on the RX 570 number. I also included the RX 590, 560, and 550 along with the Vega cards (not mobile Vega, though). But then I sum up the entire column and divide the figures by that total to get the final "percentage of the whole" that I reported.

    135
    You probably used the Vulkan API, which is fubar numbers. I don't know why, but the Vulkan numbers are all basically double what they should be, across all GPUs. If you sum up the Vulkan API columns, they equal 194% to 196%. Here's my "corrected" Vulkan API data, the last few rows. To the right is the adjusted result (divide the main percentage by the total for the column), which correctly sums to 100%. I don't know what Valve omits, but it's problematic that Vulkan sums to 194% or more while DirectX 12 sums to around 90%.

    140
    Here's the same section using the DirectX 12 data:

    139
    AgentBirdnest said:
    And I didn't really think about laptop 30-series, which probably makes up a good chunk of that 21.7% (I assume you counted those?)
    Yes, laptop data is generally included, for dedicated GPUs. I omit the AMD Vega Graphics integrated solutions, though, as those would skew the Vega + Polaris numbers. If you're wondering, total Nvidia mobile GPUs (at least those that are explicitly identified as mobile) for RTX 30-series accounts for 6.76% of the total, or about a third of all RTX 30-series. For the RTX 20-series, as well as GTX 16 and GTX 10, there's no clear way of seeing how many GPUs are mobile. AMD's integrated Vega Graphics solutions meanwhile account for 2.38% of all surveyed PCs, and most of those are probably laptops.
    Reply
  • TheJohnWick
    This data is very skewed. The reality is that after 2 years since the launch of the RTX 3XXX the percentage is 13.05 without counting the laptops. Very sad. They are not selling GPUs.
    Reply
  • JarredWaltonGPU
    TheJohnWick said:
    This data is very skewed. The reality is that after 2 years since the launch of the RTX 3XXX the percentage is 13.05 without counting the laptops. Very sad. They are not selling GPUs.
    This is where it would be super useful if Steam/Valve were more transparent. Assuming random sampling of all active Steam users in a month, Valve apparently has 120 million users as the population (source here). If 13.05% of those are RTX 30-series desktop card owners, that's 15.66 million GPUs — and another 8.11 million laptop users. I remember a couple of years ago when Nvidia made a big deal about the total number of RTX users (before Ampere launched) surpassing 15 million. Plus, I would wager at least a third of all RTX 30-series GPUs still remain in the mines and wouldn't show up on Steam, so Nvidia has potentially shipped closer to 35 million RTX 30-series cards. They have sold every Ampere GPU manufactured up until the past three months, basically — just not to gamers. And even among gamers, Ampere has sold very well.
    Reply
  • renz496
    TheJohnWick said:
    This data is very skewed. The reality is that after 2 years since the launch of the RTX 3XXX the percentage is 13.05 without counting the laptops. Very sad. They are not selling GPUs.

    just because you see tons of them on the shelves meaning no one is buying them.
    Reply