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AMD X670E AM5 Motherboard Lands in Overclocker's Hands

AM5 Socket
(Image credit: AMD)

With the Ryzen 7000 series launch right on top of us, Gigabyte is now reportedly sending overclockers early samples of its flagship X670E motherboards to play with. Overclocking enthusiast @SkatterBencher tweeted just several hours ago showcasing a brand new Gigabyte X670E Aorus Master he got in the mail unexpectedly.

Sending samples directly to professional overclockers is a common practice by both AMD and Intel, so they're generally the first wave of users to get the latest and greatest equipment - ahead of reviewers. This serves a dual purpose: Overclockers can provide feedback to the chipmakers on areas that need improvement, and the CPUs can garner extra attention from the public as overclockers will break world records using Intel's or AMD's new chips.

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Despite this, Gigabyte did not send over their flagship motherboard, the Aorus Extreme. Instead, it sent over its runner-up, the Aorus Master, with a slightly weaker power delivery system.

Nonetheless, the board appears to be a very capable platform for overclocking AMD's new Ryzen 7000 chips. With a reported 16-phase power design that features 105-amp power stages. This is similar to the 16-phase VRM found on the X570 Aorus Extreme. For more details, check out our coverage here.

Overclocking AMD's new Zen 4-powered Ryzen 7000 CPUs will be very interesting. These chips are the first AMD processors to clock well past 5GHz on ambient cooling and reached as high as 5.5GHz in a previous AMD demo — without overclocking.

But that result might be conservative, according to a report we covered a few days ago. The Ryzen 7000 flagship is expected to hit a peak boost frequency of 5.7GHz, which is very close to the 5.8GHz results we've seen with Intel's competing Raptor Lake engineering samples.

As a result, we can expect overclocking these chips to run well past 5.7GHz and possibly into the 6GHz range if AMD's Zen 4 architecture has the headroom for it. But, we'll have to wait for real overclocking results to see if this becomes true.

Thankfully we won't have to wait long for results; Ryzen 7000 has a confirmed release date of September 15th, which is less than a month away.

Aaron Klotz
Freelance News Writer

Aaron Klotz is a freelance writer for Tom’s Hardware US, covering news topics related to computer hardware such as CPUs, and graphics cards.

  • -Fran-
    Somewhat related rant: I don't like this new fad of covering the motherboard with plastic/aluminium. I can understand covering sensitive elements or components, but things that need cooling like the chipsets, I'd rather see a proper cooler there instead and not something* that looks like a plastic cap for looks. That being said, in specific to this board, I think it's not the worst offender (looking at you NZXT*) and the only real thing I don't like is how unnecessarily tall they're making the back panel thingy.

    Also, the VRM cooling does look beefy, so that's a good sign for how this board can perform, I guess?

    Regards.
    Reply
  • TCA_ChinChin
    -Fran- said:
    I don't like this new fad of covering the motherboard with plastic/aluminium. I can understand covering sensitive elements or components, but things that need cooling like the chipsets, I'd rather see a proper cooler there instead and not something* that looks like a plastic cap for looks. That being said, in specific to this board, I think it's not the worst offender (looking at you NZXT*) and the only real thing I don't like is how unnecessarily tall they're making the back panel thingy.

    Can't agree with you enough. IMO a decently designed anodized aluminum fin array or heatsink would look better than 90% of the plasticky stuff they have already. It is understandable for some components or specific board sizes/types but I'm guessing they don't do it for cost reasons.
    Reply
  • 8086
    I agree and I'm also sad to see a reduction in the number of PCI-e slots. I would much rather use a riser board on an x8 or x16 slot for M.2 and free up mobo space for more pci-e slots so I can use upgraded components like a better NIC, Sound Card, Capture card, raid, etc. A high end board with quality caps, vrm, high quality PCB, etc and a minimalist approach to onboard stuff (NIC and the latest USB is appreciated) would be right up my ally.
    Reply
  • HideOut
    less than a month away? Its over 5 weeks, but hey. close enough
    Reply