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Ryzen 7 4700G Reportedly Pushes AMD APUs To Eight Cores

AMD Ryzen Processor

AMD Ryzen Processor (Image credit: AMD)

Two days ago, an unidentified octa-core AMD Ryzen APU, which is rumored to be desktop Renoir, emerged from the depths of the UserBenchmark database. According to the latest finding by tipster @_rogame, that APU might be the Ryzen 7 4700G.

Just like mobile Renoir, the desktop models should leverage the same combination that has worked wonders for AMD's other processors. That would be the Zen 2 microarchitecture packaged with TSMC's 7nm FinFET process node. The current Picasso line of APUs use the Zen+ architecture and 12nm manufacturing process, so Renoir will be a huge improvement from a technological standpoint.

As far as features are concerned, we can expect Renoir desktop APUs to natively support DDR4-3200 memory modules right out of the box. PCIe 4.0 support, however, is up in the air. If you recall, AMD's Renoir mobile processors remained on the PCIe 3.0 interface, so it remains to be seen if the desktop chips will take after either the mobile counterparts or AMD's Ryzen 3000-series (codename Matisse) desktop processors that already embrace PCIe 4.0.

ModelCores / ThreadBase / Boost Clock (GHz)L3 Cache (MB)GraphicsCompute UnitsGraphics Frequency (MHz)TDP (W)
Ryzen 7 4700G*8 / 163.0 / 3.958?81,750?
Ryzen 5 3400G4 / 83.7 / 4.24Radeon RX Vega 11111,40065
Ryzen 3 3200G4 / 43.6 / 4.04Radeon Vega 881,25065

*Specifications are unconfirmed.

The Ryzen 7 4700G from the Ashes of the Singularity benchmark certainly looks genuine. Nevertheless, fake submissions have gotten by UserBenchmark before. Since we can't verify the validity of the Ashes of the Singularity result, it's best to take it with a pinch of salt for now.

At any rate, the submission doesn't reveal much about the APU, except that it has eight cores and 16 threads. The Ryzen 7 4700G would be the first APU in AMD's history to sport Ryzen 7 branding, which would be fitting when you look at the number of cores and threads on the chip.

If the Ryzen 7 4700G and the previously leaked Renoir processor are the same chip, we're looking at a 3 GHz base clock and 3.95 GHz boost clock for the engineering sample. The clock speeds don't look too bad for an engineering sample, but we expect the final product to come with higher values.

Ryzen 7 4700G (Image credit: Oxide Games)

The lack of information in the submission leaves room for a bit of speculation. The Ryzen 7 4700G could take after the Ryzen 9 4900H in terms of the iGPU design. If that were the case, the Ryzen 7 4700G would sport eight Compute Units (CUs), totaling up to 512 Stream Processors (SPs). 

Admittedly, the Ryzen 7 4700G would be a downgrade graphics-wise since the current Ryzen 5 3400G boasts up to 11 CUs. However, the Ryzen 7 4700G could offset this difference in CUs with a higher graphics clock. For reference, the Ryzen 5 3400G's CUs run at 1,400 MHz. The iGPU inside the Ryzen 9 4900H operates at 1,750 MHz, so we have a 25% improvement on our hands. Traditionally, AMD's APUs come with a 65W TDP (thermal design power), so the Ryzen 7 4700G will have considerably more room to stretch its legs. We wouldn't be surprised if AMD clocks the iGPU a bit higher.

AMD's APUs hold great value for budget gamers, so pricing will be a crucial factor in the Ryzen 7 4700G's success. The Ryzen 5 3400G currently sells for $149. The Ryzen 7 4700G seemingly comes with twice the cores, so it'll be exciting to see how AMD prices the octa-core APU.

  • mdd1963
    The jump to 6 CPU cores in an APU would have been semi-expected, but, 8 instead? Great...!

    Now bump the graphics up to something 1050i -level.... and they will sell! The 2200G-3400G-sereis of integrated graphics rivaling a GTX1030 are certainly better than a sneaky crotch kick, but, they lack 'gpu muscle'.... (We'd all like to see GTX1650 SUper-level of APU capability, but, I'm hoping for a small realistic but noteworthy improvement)
    Reply
  • CBed19
    I have a feeling we are going to see core counts go up.

    Ryzen 3: 6 Core
    5; 8 core
    7: 12 core
    9: 16 core

    I bet this CPU is a 4400G or 4600G not a 4700G.
    Making the assumption that mobile and desktop SKUs need similar configurations is a stretch.
    Who knows though.
    Reply
  • gg83
    I really hate the # naming scheme. It is so confusing. Then add the next ryzen 4000 series.
    Reply
  • cryoburner
    CBed19 said:
    I have a feeling we are going to see core counts go up.
    It's possible, seeing as Intel will be cutting their pricing for a given core count to roughly match AMD's offerings with Comet Lake. However, if this particular benchmark leak is to be believed, this 8-core processor will be called the Ryzen 7 4700G. That doesn't necessarily mean that other core counts won't be available as Ryzen 7 parts though, as we have seen that with the Ryzen 5 APUs having fewer cores than the other Ryzen 5 parts without graphics.

    Another possibility though, is that AMD may keep core counts the same and simply reduce their prices a bit for each of those levels. It might be a bit of a stretch to expect an 8-core Ryzen to launch near $200, as the current models are still priced around $300 for that core-count, but a price under $300 could potentially happen. Of course, depending on how much performance gains the architectural changes of the Zen 3 architecture bring, AMD might not see much need to reduce pricing for a given core count substantially.
    Reply
  • Jim90
    If they were to 'step over' the more likely several iterations before, they could cause major disruption now, if they paired this up with a suitable RDNA-2 piece. They certainly have the tech to do this. In the end though - and absolutely understandably - it's all about maximising profit against current competition i.e. no company will jump this far into its available tech -if- it is capable of making profit iteratively. Still, the potential is clearly there, now. Interesting times, and well done AMD for 'waking up'.
    Reply
  • SebOno
    CBed19 said:
    I have a feeling we are going to see core counts go up.

    Ryzen 3: 6 Core
    5; 8 core
    7: 12 core
    9: 16 core

    I bet this CPU is a 4400G or 4600G not a 4700G.
    Making the assumption that mobile and desktop SKUs need similar configurations is a stretch.
    Who knows though.

    I agree! I think that the Threadripper 4990X or whatever it gets called will be the first ever 128-core CPU. As of now, the Threadripper 3990X is the most top-of-the-line highest-end desktop CPU, with the Epyc 7H12 being the fastest CPU in their server range. It will be good to see AMD beat its own record!

    I also want to see Intel bump up their core counts. As of right now, the Core i9-10980XE is its most top of the line highest endesktop CPU on their end, with the Xeon W-3175X being their highest end server CPU. I want to see 32-, 48- or even 64-core Intel CPUs in the future.
    Reply
  • domih
    If this is confirmed, this is good news. The AMD G APUs and Intel CPU with IG are great solutions for low or middle cost DIY home, SOHO NAS or any flavor of edge servers. Using the integrated graphics is plenty sufficient for admin. This leaves the PCIe slot (mini-itx) or slots (mATX) free for real RAID cards and/or beefed up network cards, 10Gbe or higher.
    Reply
  • PapaCrazy
    gg83 said:
    I really hate the # naming scheme. It is so confusing. Then add the next ryzen 4000 series.
    And when they start producing mobile chips and APUs on Zen 3, that will probably become 5000 series. Not keeping model #s matched to generation #s is snowballing on them. Pretty soon we'll see Zen 4 Ryzen 7000 series, Zen 5 Ryzen 9000 series, etc. Maybe that doesn't matter much to enthusiasts, but Ma and Pa shopping for a new computer are gonna have a hell of a time.
    Reply